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Full text of "Sponsor"

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY IkL 

GENERAL LIBRARY ' 

3B SegKEf^kklfi PLAZA, NEW YORK, N. Y» 




Onon impreisei hit milk sponsors (pages 4 incl 17) 



Listening: Fall 1947 • Humanizing a public utility 
Transcriptions: Question mark • Milk on the air 



ii 



WWVA 

announces the 
appointment of 

EDWARD PETRY k CO. 

as national representatives 
effective October 15, 1947 



WWVA 



wheeling, west Virginia 
50,000 watts, in the heart of the steel and 

coal belt of the nation 



1 




• • 



. .SPONSOR REPOl 
.SPONSOR REPORTS.. 



NOVEMBER 1947 



CEREAL FIRMS 
RETRENCHING 



GIVEAWAYS 
GET NBC 
FROWN 



NO FCC ACTION 

EXPECTED ON 
WEB STATION 
REPRESENTATION 



CINCINNATI 
PULSE 



FOOTBALL'S 
MULTIPLE 



SPONSORSHIP 



MORE NETWORK 
SIDELINES 



WEATHER 
SPOTS 
NOT 
PROHIBITED 



Tight grain market is forcing cereal firm retrenchment of advertis- 
ing budgets. Kellogg 's requested six-month hiatus on "Breakfast 
Club" was refused by ABC on ground that period could be sold to one 
of clients on waiting list. General Mills will start making cuts in 
November with at least two network programs affected. 

-SR- 
Programs depending on giveaways for appeal are being frowned on by 
NBC. Its own "Honeymoon in New York" is expected to exit on Jan- 
uary 1 and sponsors will be urged to stress entertainment rather than 
something for nothing. This will have no effect on productions like 
"Truth or Consequences," "Dr. I. Q." or similar shows. 

-SR- 
Petition by station representatives association to Federal Communi- 
cations Commission to stop networks representing affiliate stations 
is not expected to get anywhere unless reps prove coercion. Net- 
works are expected to establish separate corporations for their 
spots sales organizations after fuss and fury is over. 

-SR- 
The Pulse Incorporated has added Cincinnati to list of cities in 
which it is conducting surveys. With first report of Cincinnati 
Pulse, the organization will be covering six areas with 6,289,880 
radio families. This is 18.5 per cent of U. S. total. 

-SR- 
Football is proving even more commercial than expected when season 
opened. WIND, Chicago, sold games to five sponsors. Underwriters 
include Karoll's Men Shops, Standard Oil of Indiana, Armour Packing, 
Goebel Brewing and Atlas Prager Beer. Some key games, i.e., Notre 
Dame's, Michigan's, Penn's, will have as many as 18 broadcasting 
booths and as many sponsors. The games in some cases go to single 
stations, in others to regional chains. 

-SR- 
Realizing that losses from TV operations will be staggering during 
next few years, networks are more and more emphasizing profitable 
sidelines. CBS' purchase from Fletcher Wiley of Housewives' Protec- 
tive League (program producing organization) for rumored $1,000,000 
is one of these moves. CBS has in past paid HPL thousands for pro- 
grams on WBBM, KNX, KMOX and KQW. Move will switch New York program 
of HPL from WJZ to WCBS. 

-SR- 

Weather Bureau admitted recently, after an earlier ruling to the 
contrary, that it had no control over weather broadcasts on sta- 
tions. Reported ban on recorded weather spots never was an order 
since only thing Bureau can police is representation that jingle or 
song is an "official" pronouncement of USWB. Credit Harry S. Good- 
man for going right to Washington to get clarification. 



SPONSOR, Vol. 2, No. 1, November 1947. Published monthly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 N. Mervine St., Philadelphia 
41, Pa. Advertising, Editorial and Circulation offices, 40 W. 52 St., New York 19. N. Y. Subscription $5.00 a year in U. S.. $5.50 elsewhere. Appli- 
cation is pending acceptance under act of June 5, 1934. 




FASHION GETS 
HALF OF ABC 
FAN MAIL 



MBS RESEARCH 
TRAVELS 



ALONE 



RURAL STATION 
BUSINESS 
HITS ALL-TIME 
HIGH 



STATIONS 
RESENT 
RADIO MFGS 
NON-USE 



OF RADIO 



TRAVELING 
RESEARCH 



ised instead 


of Cross] 


Hooper** 




Crossleyt 


* 




43.9 


12.9 




42.4 


13.7 




44.1 


18.7 




48.8 


26.8 




59.4 


24.7 




60.2 



Over 50 per cent of ABC's mail in September was written about one 
thing and came to one broadcaster, Ted Malone. It was all on sub- 
ject of the feminine "new look." Mail count was 110,596 with 
Malone 's pro and con letters adding up to 56,788. 

-SR- 

Mutual is going it alone researchwise at this time. MBS thus far 
has not subscribed to Broadcast Measurement Bureau. It has dropped 
Hooper. Archibald Crossley made special MBS Crossley Rating report 
on World Series. Rating was on "recall basis" technique discarded 
with Cooperative Analysis of Broadcasting (CAB) some years ago. Its 
"listenability" report (which MBS is using to indicate coverage) 
is new variation of signal strength presentations. Basis of 
"listenability" is that since MBS hasn't top programs (with excep- 
tion of a few public service airings and whodunits) it must present 
sponsors with possibilities of what might happen if a Bob Hope aired 
on web. World Series listening figures are another indication of 
what can happen on MBS. Figures are amazing even if coincidental 



1st & 2nd game 

2nd & 3rd game 

3rd & 4th game 

4th & 5th game 

5th & 6th game 

6th & 7th game 
*first game not on a Hooperated day so no survey made. 
**per cent of total homes in Hooper surveyed area, 
tper cent of radio homes in Crossley surveyed area. 

-SR- 

Farm station business is at all-time high. This is based upon un- 
official figures reported to FCC which will be basis of report 
issued in 1948. Reason for surge of rural spot business is amazing 
farm income increase. Farm income in 1946 reached $25,322,896,000, 
and 1947 is expected to increase this 10 to 25 per cent. 

-SR- 

Resentment against radio manufacturers using so little broadcast 
time to sell receivers has manifested itself in a number of stations 
not cooperating with NAB-RMA (Radio Manufacturers Association) cam- 
paign to place multiple sets in every home. Station most voluble on 
subject was WGN, Chicago. Only set manufacturers on the air are 
Pilot (MBS), Philco (ABC), and RCA-Victor (NBC), with Stromberg- 
Carlson using small FM network (Continental) to help frequency 
modulation along. 

-SR- 

Qualitative research picked up its equipment during past months and 
tested audiences in Ft. Wayne and Boston. McCann-Erickson took 
Lazarsfeld-Stanton Program Analyser to Ft. Wayne and for two weeks 
tested clients' programs. CBS took its "Big Annie," mass audience 
reaction recorder, to Boston to test programs for network and sta- 
tion WEEI. 



SPONSOR 




SORRY, WE HAVEN'T ANY 
BRIGADIER-ADMIRALS... 

— but WVET has almost everything else to 
help you do a whizz-bang of a selling job! 



Who won the Battle of 
Rochester for this high 
profit market's 5000 watt 
station? 38 veterans stub- 
born enough to insist there's 
NO SUBSTITUTE for plain 
old-fashioned get-up-and-go. 
And now WVET is out to 
do some fancy battling for 
vou! 




No . . . we have no intention of 
dropping you like a hot potato 
once you've signed. We've been 
timebuyers and clients our- 
selves so we know what you're 
up against . . . firmly believe in 
servicing the sale. 



I. 



Thanks, old man, but we 
don't ivant an A for Effort. 
All we're after is A-f re- 
sults for YOU — whether 
you're out to break sales 
records for Flapdoodle's De- 
licious Gumdrops or Diesel- 
powered tractors. 









>■ 3. Frankly, we can't afford to 



miss any boats because we've 
invested our own hard- 
earned sheckels in WVET 
... all 38 of us. To put it 
candidly, we have to make 
money for YOU — so we can 
make money for us. 








5. You bet we'll test shows for you 
and give you complete advertis- 
ing and merchandising service. 
Anything to help you sell more of 
those delicious gumdrops — or any- 
thing else you want to promote. 
We can also give you expert, on- 
the-spot help with local distribu- 
tion problems. 



6. We're set up to give you the kind of personal, indi- 
vidualized service you want . . . the kind of service 
Q that will help you get bigger and better returns from 

every one of your WVET broadcasts. 

So hurry to your nearest three-cent stamp and write 
for full details about Rochester's new live-wire, up- 
and-at-'em station— WVET ! 

VETERANS BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 
204 GRANITE BLDG., ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



WVET 

5000 WATTS 1280 ON YOUR DIAL 

(YOUR MUTUAL STATION) 

NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY WEED AND COMPANY 



NOVEMBER 1947 



#. 



I Wi^ 



\^fl 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

NEW AND RENEW 

MR. SPONSOR: MORRIS SHAPIRO 

MILK ON THE AIR 

INDUSTRY CHART: DAIRY PRODUCTS 

THE OHIO STORY 

LISTENING: 1947 

TRANSCRIPTIONS: QUESTION MARK 

REPEAT BROADCASTS 

TV-FM-FAX 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

CHILDREN'S HOUR 

SPOT PROGRAM DIRECTORY 

SIGNED AND UNSIGNED 

BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 




1 
4 
9 
12 
17 
21 
23 
26 
30 
34 
36 
40 
42 
44 
58 
62 
67 
78 
78 



PublUhed monthly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Executive, 
Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 Street, New 
VorklO, N.Y. Telophone: Plaza 3-6216. Chica«o()ffico: 410 
.\. Michigan, relcphotie; Whitehall 3540. Publication Offices: 
.■iSOO North Mcrvinc Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. Subscrip- 
tions: United State.<!$5avear;Canada$5.50. Sinelc copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1947 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



President and Publisher: Norman R. Glenn. Secretary- 
Treasurer: Elaine C. Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. Eoehler. 
AsKociate Editors: Frank Bannister, Charles Sinclair. Art 
Director: Howard Wechslcr. Advertising Director: Lcrter 
J. Hlumenthal. Advertising Departimnt; Edwin D. Cooper, 
Chicago Manager: Kav Urnwn. (Loa Angeles) Duncan A.Scott 
A Co., 44S S.Hill St.: (San Francisco) Duncan A. .''cott A Co., 
Mills BIdg. Circulation Manager: Milton Kaye. 



(■0\'ER PICTIRE: Jack Carson fSealtestVillege Store) pays 
tribute to thesourceofhic:poasorabip-milk. (Story on pace 17) 




M i2Dil 



"SPONSOR TOPS LIST" 

We are in the process of organizing the 
radio department of a brand new agency. 
After looking over the magazines in the 
field, we decided that sponsor tops the 
list. In fact, we are so impressed with the 
issues we have seen that we hate to think 
of all those we missed while our firm was 
still in the blueprint stage. 

Please start our subscription immedi- 
ately and please let us know if there is 
any way we can acquire back issues (es- 
pecially July's Fall Facts). 

Mary Elizabeth Gaynor 

Radio Director 

Woodward & Fris Inc. 

Albany, N. Y. 



We think sponsor is doing a good job, 
providing advertising agencies like our- 
selves with many ideas that are useful in 
the planning and purchasing of radio 
spots. 

Congratulations on your September 

issue which is chuck full of ideas which 

will help us to make money for ourselves 

and our clients. Keep up the good work. 

Richard Jorcensen 

Richard Jorgensen Advertising 

San Francisco 



AGENCIES NEED SELLING AID 

Well, I gather from Phillip Frank's 
letter in your current issue (October) that, 
while there isn't any blazing bonfire on 
the subject of radio's lack of promotion 
there is, at least, a wisp of smoke around 
the edges. 

I don't think that we gain very much 
by getting into the pros and cons of 
BMB, although I can understand Mr. 
Frank's very natural tendency to rush to 
its defense. But — well, let's put it this 
way: Our clients who currentl)' use the 
New York Daily News know that their 
copy is going to a paid circulation of 
2,352,484 on weekda>s. The\' know that 
1,657,933 of that is city zone circulation, 
and that 464,517 is trading zone. Let's 
forget about readership, and the other 
imponderables, and stick to the circula- 
tion /acfs. Uany New York radio station 
can furnish anything as factual as the 
above figures, I'll be glad to recommend 
it recklessly from here on in. 

Now, let's not be silly aboift it; 
nobody's condemning radio as an adver- 




DAVENPORT, ROCK ISLAND 
MOLINE, EAST MOLINE 



Only woe delivers satisfactory 
year-round \BC service to the 
Ouad-Cities . . . the largest 
metropolitan area between Chi- 
cago and Omaha, and between 
Minneapolis and St. Louis. 
.\ppro.\iniatcly 218,000 jieople 
work and live here . . . make it 
the 40th retail market in the 
nation. 

5,000 Wstli, 14J0 Ke. 
Basic NBC Affiliate 

B. J. Palmer. President 
Buryl Lottridse, Manasci 




SPONSOR 



It's As Sim ple 

As Reading Off 

A Log — 



The network owned and ronlrolled 
division ol the Columbia Broadeast- 
ing System, Radio Sales, has made 
some extravagant claims about their 
achievements in Spot Radio to some 
CBS affiliated stations. 

Specifically, they've claimed prow- 
ess in selling locally produced pro- 
grams to national advertisers and 
chose their performance on WEEI, 
Boston, as the classic example. 

We compete with Radio Sales in 
Boston. We checked the logs for 
WEEI and for WNAC for a recent 
random week. The FACTS show: 

• We sold more Single Sponsored 
programs (21% more) to more 
National advertisers (11% more) 
using more time (40% more). 

• We sold more Multiple Sponsored 
programs (126% more) to more 
National advertisers (113% more) 
using more time (119% more). 



• We sold, altogether. 79% more 
programs to 75% more National 
advertisers for a total of 94% more 
total program time. 

We believe that the sale of local 
shows is important but it is only one 
of many important responsibilities 
we conceive ourselves to have. 
Representing radio stations means 
representing their best interests — 
all of them. 

In short, we will continue to 
follow the policies which have 
governed our successfid operation 
for some 15 vears. We will con- 
tinue to present the many advan- 
tages of Spot Broadcasting to 
National advertisers and to represent 
the best interests of our stations, 
even when they conflict with those 
of the networks. We will continue 
to sell advertisers whatever facihties 
the stations have available to move 
merchandise most effectively. 



t 



J 





■*?<? «T»» ►«» ^^ 



m 

Lll 



y 



1 



I 



•fix 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES 

ATLANTA • BOSTON 
DETROIT • ST. LOUIS • SAN FRANCISCO 



1 
J. 



NOVEMBER 1947 



YOU MIGHT STEAL 
892 BASES - 





YOU CAN'T SLIDE 

INTO WESTERN MICHIGAN 

WITHOUT WKZO-WJEF! 



If you are trying to reach Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo and 
Western Michigan from any "outside" city — >vcll, it's no 
runs, no hits, hut a very real errorl 

Western Michigan has a fading condition >»hich strikes out 
the reception of even the most powerful outside signal. 
All you have to do to prove this point is to study any listening 
report you choose. . . . 

To coier Western Michigan (an<l to get the highest Hoopers 
in the area, morning, noon or night) the majority of adver- 
tisers use \\ K/,()-VS JEF. Th<'s«' l>v<> ('US stations give you a 
cond>ination that i-an't he matched hy any other station or 
eomhination of stations either inside or outside the area. 
ish for the fads — from us, or from Avery-Knodel. In<'. 

* Diiriiiu, 21 Vi'ors of Ixisfhiill. I'y Cohh stole H')2 bases. 



>llfUEF 



^^^ IN KALAMAZOO I /^^ in GRAND RAPIDS 



•n4 GRIATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

(Ctt) 



AND KENT COUNTY 



^^^-^^ll^' "^"^ AND opEB^^no I'nlA^^'^'* 
^ ^WOADCASTINC ^^^ 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC., EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



f'lO Hest52nr] 



tisinj; medium because it happens to be 
one where its very nature makes an exact 
counting of noses an impossibih'ty. It 
seems to me, however, that it's that very 
impossibility that points up the necessity 
for marshaling whatever information is 
available, maintaining a running check for 
other/dcfiui/ d(Kumentation, and doing an 
over-all promotion job for radio as an 
advertising medium, and doing it com- 
petitively. 

Let's settle the individual station prop- 
osition by pointing out here and now that 
every broadcaster in, say, Detroit has a 
pitch all prepared that's designed to show 
the timebuyer why his station, station A, 
is better than station B. Station B has a 
nice offset brochure on the subject, and 
so on down the line. But, has anybody 
ever seen a presentation on the superiority 
of radio, as a whole, over Detroit news- 
papers? I think not. 

I haven't anything against Detroit, 
really, excepting for the fact that there's 
an automobile manufacturer there who's 
been holding up my new car for over two 
years. And I suppose that a one market 
radio promotion is too much to expect. 
It just seemed to me a simple way to 
illustrate the fact that while I've sat 
through presentations where magazines 
blasted away at radio, and newspapjers 
trained the big guns on radio, I've never 
been around when radio popped away at 
anybody with so much as a pea shooter. 
And while it would be manifestly ridicu- 
lous to accent destructive selling as the 
only form of good selling, it's just as silly 
for radio stations to expend all of their 
promotional ammunition firing at each 
other, completely ignoring the outside 
barrages aimed at all of them. 

I don't think that it's unfair to expect 
the radio broadcasting industry to invest 
some of its profits in something that will 
inevitably return to them in the form of 
additional profit. More than that, with 
the gravy train threatening to pull out of 
the station 'most any time now, this isn't 
a very good time to be laggard. 

And so far as my attitude as a radio 
director is concerned, it all boils down to 
this: It would be a lot more useful all 
around if the station men would spend less 
time, individually, trying to sell me, and 
use it collectively working on something 
for me to sell with. 

Next! Raymond E. Nelson 

President 

Raymond E. Nelson Inc. 
[Please turn to page 76) 



SPONSOR 




RAIX-a la carte 

The Salt River Valley of Arizona was in the death-grip of parching 
drought . . . but suddenly . . . THE RAINS CAME! 

A stroke of luck in this arid land? 

No! That life-giving rainfall was the result of man and his science. 

Since time began man was the slave of nature . . . expecting little and 
hoping much of the thunderheads, but today man has discovered that 
the pilot of an airplane can drop dry ice pellets into the moist clouds 
and rain will fall . . . when and where he wants it! 

Yesterday the rain clouds were raisers with their wealth . . . today they 
are the nation's sky -borne reservoir! 

And just as science probes the future, so WSPD looks ahead, finds new 
ways to better serve the people who live and w ork and buy in the North- 
west Ohio area. WSPD's search for 
"Things to Come" has resulted in 
"Action Today" . . . action in the 
form of sales resvdts — the kind of 
action that keeps WSPD in its 
position of the most effective adver- 
tising medium in Northwest Ohio. 



A QUARTER CENTURY • THE VOICE OF TOLEDO 



WSPD TOLEDO, OHIO 



5000 WATTS 



Just ask. Katz 



NOVEMBER 1947 



<^runTS 



fi4<^^ 



I 



6^0% 



le\Qw\sion^s greatest comedy show 




Wrestling Matches Pull Television's Biggest Audiences ,,, and 
they're all yours on Du Mont Station WABD, New York 

Here's a tailor-made program all get for you. 

Blend of good hard fighting and pure come<ly, WABD's Friday Evening 
Wrestling Matches have a large and devoted following. There are several spots 
for video commercials between bouts and Dennis James will work in 
plugs with his comment— either in his own inimitable manner or straight 
as you prefer. Phone or wire today— 



WA B D Time Sales Dcpt. 

515 Madison Avenue, New York 22 

Pliunc: PL 3-9800 




fO RSACe ^ 



Your fastest-growing audience 
—budget for it now! 



WABD 



NEW YORK 



Key Station of the 



Television Network 



SPONSOR 



new and renew 



yVe^6( Maiianai BfuU BnA^Ute^iA. 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, start, duration 



American Airlines 
W. K. Buckley Ltd 
Burlington Brewing Co 
Colgate-Pal molive-Peet 


Transportation 

Cougii syrup 

Beer 

Ajax Cleanser 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 

(irant 

Goodkind, Joice & Mor 

Sherman & Marquette 


20-.10 

40 

gan 8 

125 


Commercial Solvents Co. 
Emerson Drug Co 


Dry-Ex anti-freezc 
Bromo-Seltzer 


Fuller, Smith & Ross 
BBD&O 


12-15 
20-40 


Grove Laboratories Inc 

Radio Gospel Fellowship 
Schutter Candy Co 
United P'ruit Co 


Bromo-Ouinine 

Cold Tablets 
Institutional 
Candy 
Bananas 


Duane Jones 

Glasser-Gailey 
Schwimmer & Scott 
BBD&O 


75-100 

13 

10 
75-100 



Live spots, breaks; Oct 13; 13 wks 

E.t. annoiincemenls; Nov 3; 13 wks 

"Ted Lewis Show" e.t.'s; Oct-Nov; 13 wks 

Adding additional markets to existing e.t. announce- 
ment campaigns; Oct-.Nov; 13 wks 

Spots, breaks; Nov 15; 4 wks 

E.t. breaks, spots before and after baseball games; 
1948 season 

E.t. spots, breaks; Dec 1; seasonal 

"Challenge to Youth" e.t.'s; Oct 26; 52 wks 
E.t. announcements; Oct 6; 52 wks 
E.t. breaks, spots; Dec 1; 13 wks 



Aleia Oh, /\leiwjMJu 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Campana Sales Co 
H. C. Cole Milling Co 
First National Stores 
Illinois Watch Case Co (Elgin 

Amer Div) 
Manhattan Soap Co 
R. B. Semler 
Trimount Clothing Co 
U S Army Recruiting Service 
Washington Cooperative 

Farmers Assn 



Wallace- Ferry-Han ley 
Gardner 
John C. Dowd 
Weiss & Geller 

Duane Jones 
Erwin, Wasey 
William H. Weintraub 
N. W. Ayer 
Pacific National 



CBS 
MBS 
ABC 
ABC 

NBC 
MBS 
MBS 
MBS 
NBC 



57 

160 

10 



*153 

350 

350 

300 

20Pac 



First Nighter; Sat 8-8:30 pm; Oct 4; 52 wks 

Eddie Lee's Omega Show; Sun 3-3:30 pm; Oct 5; 52 wks 

Guy Lombardo; Th 9:30-10 pm; Oct 2; 52 wks 

You Bet Your Life; Mon 8-8:30 pm; Oct 27; .52 wks 

Katie's Daughter; MTWTF 11 :15-11 :30 am; .Sep 29; 52 wks 
Martin Block; MWF 2:30-2:45 pm; Oct 13; 52 wks 
Sherlock Holmes; Sun 7-7:30 pm; Sep 28; 52 wks 
Army Football Games; .Sat 1:45 pm; Sep 27 
Jack Gregson; Sat 9-9:30 am pst; Oct 18; 52 wks 



* 117 New stations added. 

iFifty-imo weeks generally meant a 13-week contract with options for 3 successive 13-iDeek renewals. It's suhjeel to cancellation at the end of any 13-week period) 



R,e*te4AMUl 0*1 Neiwo^JzA, 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Amer Home Prods Corp (White- 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 


NBC 


57 


hall Pharmacal Co div) 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample 


NBC 


56 


Amer Tobacco Co (American 


Foote, Cone & Belding 


NBC 


159 


Cigarette & Cigar Co div) 








Bristol-Myers Co 


Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield 


ABC 


183 


Campbell Soup Co 


Ward Wheelock 


CBS 


145 


Hall Bros Inc 


Foote, Cone & Belding 


CBS 


157 


Hudson Coal Co 


Clements 


NBC 


13 


R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co 


William Esty 


CBS 


153 


Southern Cotton Oil Co 


Fitzgerald 


NBC 


7 


Western Auto Supply Co 


Bruce B. Brewer 


NBC 


57 


Wildroot Co 


BBD&O 


NBC 


159 



Just Plain Bill; MTWTF 5:30-5:45 pm; .Sep 29; .52 wks 
Front Page Farrell; MTWTF 5:45-6 pm; Sep 29; 52 wks 
Big Story; Wed 10-10:.?0 pm; Oct 1 

Break the Bank; Fri 9-9:30 pm; Oct 3; 52 wks 

Meet Corliss Archer; Sun 9-9:30 pm; Oct 5; 52 wks ' 

Reader's Digest— Radio Edition; Th 10-10:30 pm; Sep 11; 

52 wks 
D & H Miners; Sun 9:45-10 am; Oct 12; 52 wks 
Bob Hawk; Mon 10:30-11 pm; Oct 6; 52 wks 
Noah Webster Says; Th 9:30-10 pm pst; Oct 16; 52 wks 
Circle Arrow Show; .Sun 10:30-11 am; Oct 5; 52 wks 
King Cole Trio Time; Sat 5:45-6 pm; Oct 18; 52 wks 



J\le44J- and R,e*tziaed a*t *^ele>aU404i> 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Packing Co 
American Tobacco Co 



Artophonc (Philco div) 
Atlantic Refining Co 
Atlas Brewing Co 
Barr's Jewelers 
Beneficial Saving Fund 



Anfenger KSD-TV, St. Louis 

Foote, Cone & Belding WCBS-TV, New York 
KSD-TV, St. Louis 
W.NBT, New York 
Marjorie Wilten KSD-TV. St. Louis 

N. W. Ayer WPTZ, Philadelphia 

Olian WBKB, Chicago 

Edward J. Prager WPTZ, Philadelphia 

Richard A. Foley WPTZ, Philadelphia 



Spots preceding all televised sports; Sep 26; indefinite (n) 

Film spots; 3 weekly; Oct 2; 52 wks (n) 

Film spots; 5 weeklj; Sep 28; 13 wks (n) 

0>llege football games; Sep 27; season (n) 

High school football; Oct 11; season (n) 

I'niv. of Pa. football games; Sat afternoons; Oct 4; season (n) 

Chi. Cardinal's football games; Sun aft; Oct 5; season (n) 

Time signals at station sign-off; Sep 29; 13 wks (n) 

Time signals; Sat afternoons; Oct 4 to Nov 29 (n) 



NOVEMBER 1947 







SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duiation 



llii ur ( ATS Im- 
Itoiiilfil AiiKi SiilcN 
Itoluny \V<>rHlrd MIIIk 

Biiliivn Walcli (:<> ' 
nVI) Corp 



Ciinii'i (jintlies Inc 
KllJin National Watih Co 

Mort Farr 

(.fiit'ral Koods (:<irp 

(form's Radio «c Telc- 

viNlon (^> 
llouNi- <if llawick 
Knox The Ilattor 

MarciiN & ()o 
IMiiladclphla Kkrirlc Co 
I'liilio Distributors Inc 
Siipi-rliiu' Apiillance Co 
IraiiMiiirra Products Co 
I S Kul.biT Co 

U ilf liriis. \|>pli;liuis 



I.i-Mir Wolff Wens- I \ , \.» \ti 

William Warrin WAHI). St w York 

Siltxrhicin-i.oldsniiih WMiT. Niw ^ ork 



Blow 
Grey 



Direct 

J. Walter Thompson 

Edward Shapiro 
Younfi & Kuhicani 
Kobt. J. Fnders 

Funt-(;oldwkk 
CJeyet . Newell & 

(iai)iier 
Ralph A. Mart 
Direct 

Julian (;. Pollock 
Soils S. Cantor 
Direct 
Campbell- Km aid 

rililip Kl.'iri 



WNHW. WashlniSton 
KTI.A. l.iiN Angeles 
WItKK. ChicaUo 
WNIir. New York 
WAHI). New Y.irk 
WNHT New 1 .irk 
WPIZ. Philadelphia 
WFII- rV. Philadelphia 
W NM r. New \ ork 
WNHW, Washinftton 



St»ots precedinC football ilanus: Si p 1 1 ; m aMin Oi) 
Know ^our New ><.rk; Wed H:4.S-9 pm: Oct I; I.? wks (n) 

Weather hpots precedinfi pro fiMitball: Sep 17; season (n) 

Weather spots precedinft collefie football: Sep 27; season (n) 

■finie sliinals; Fri nights; Oct .1; II wks (n) 

Weather signals; .< weekly; Oct 7; 52 wks (n) 

Weather signals: i weekly; Oct 14; S2 wks (n) 

Weatht r signals; preceding pro fool ball games; Sep 17; season (n) 

Look Ipon a Star; Tu 7:.*0-7 :4S pm; Oct 7: 39 wks (n) 

Time signals; Sun nightr; Oct S; II wks (r) 

Time signals before and after foi'iball games; Oct 4; U wks (r) 

Farr Heiler Sports; Sat K-K:I5 pm; Sep 20; 26 wks (n) 

Jillo Progr:im; Th H-H-.M) pm; Oct 2; S wks (r) 
Time signals; Sep 17; 13 wk« (n) 



WAHI). New York Small Fry: Mon 7-7:.»0 pm; Oct 6; I.l wks (n) 

WCHS-TV. New York Columbia I,', football games; .Sat 1:50 pm; Oct ll-Nov 



22 



WPIZ, Philadelphia 
WI»T7.. Philadelphia 
WPIZ. Philadelphia 
WPTZ. Philadelphia 
W ABD, New York 
W NH r. New York and 
WI'IV Phihi.Iclphia 
W 1' I / IMiihuUlpliia 



Time signals at station sign-ofT: Oct 5; 13 wks Oi) 

Studio Show : MW 2-3 pm ; Oct 13 to Apr 14 '4K (n) 

Home football games Philadelphia Kagles; Sep 2h; season (n) 

INS Television News; 5 weekly; Oct 6; 13 wks (n) 

Spots; Sep 29; 13 wks (n) 

Campus Hoopla; Fri «-S:15 pm; .Sep 26; 13 wks (n) 

INS 1 <li\isi(,ii News; ,S «iikl> : Sip 1^; 13 «ks (r) 



NeuA A<fe4iJC4f Afup<U*it4m4tti 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT or service^, 



AGENCY 



Anur Home Foods (Joseph Uurnett Co div) 

Angelus .Shoe Polish Co, L. A 

Anre. N. Y. 

Austin Motor Co. Birmingham, Enftl 

Hirk Bros Brewing Co. Chi 

Blistex. Chi 

Campbell Music Co. Wash.. D. C 

F. Cappellino & Sons. Rochester. N. Y 

Central (irocers Clooperttive, Chi. 



Food products . . 

Shoe polish 

Women's specialty shops. . 

Motor cars 

Beer 

Proprietary formula 

Music 

Franco salad, cooking oils. 
Cooperative 



Chelsea Milling Co, Chelsea. Mich Jiffy prepared flour mixes 

Cities .Service. N. Y'. Petroleum products 

Citi^cens (Jas & Coke I'tility. Indianapolis Public utility 

Colonial Wallpaper Co. Wash.. I). C Wallpaper 

Columbia .Sales Corp. Pittsburgh I'nion car batteries . 

Conrad. St. I-ouis Celebrity wines. Laurel Springs whiskey 

Conii Packing Co.. Rochester, N. Y Mel -O- Meat products 

(;oy Hair Curler. Oakland Hair curler 

Crazy Water Crystals Co. Mineral Wells, Tex Crazy Water Crystals 

Henry De Lugach. Oakland Realtor 

FR < :orp, N. ^^ Scoop soap 

(iardiner-Warring Co. Florence, Ala Character sweatshirts 



(;arrison's Restaurant, N. Y. 

(;rove Labs.. St. Louis 

Harris Eye Lotion Corp, N. Y. 



IntI Yoghurt C<i. L. A \Am\ Yoghurt 



Restaurant 

Bromo-Ouinine Cold Tablets. 

Dr. llaiTis Eye Lotion. Drops 



Manicure device. 
Teen-age fashions. 



La Femme, San Carlos, Calif. 
La Teena, N. Y. . 

John W. Leavitt Co, Boston Teddic Brand Peanut Butter. 

Lever Bros. Co, Cambridge Silver Dust soap 

(Harriet Hubbard .Vyer div), N. Y .Cosmetics 

Lower's Brewery. N. Y. . - Beer 

Beatrice Mable. St. Louis Face cream 

Metropolis Brewing (Jo Maltcrest lirew (near beer). . . 

Milwaukee Lace Paper Co Doilies, mats, etc 

Mirrolike Mf g Co, N". Y Floor wax. furniture poIisJl ... 

Nacto Cleanser Corp, N'. Y Fabric cleaner 

Omar. Omaha Food products 

Ostab Labs.. Buffalo Mouthwash 

Pat-A-Tan Corp. Chi Cosmetics 

Phoenix Leather CJoods. N. Y Ladies' belts 

Reo Motors. Lansing, Nfich Trucks, coaches, buses 

Reo-Washington, Wash.. D. C Car dealer 

Rudolph's Candies. Wash., D. C Candy 

Santa Cola Co, L. A Carbonated beverages. . 

Santa Fe Vintage Co Wine 

Science Illustrated, N. Y'. Magazine 

Seaboard Mills. .Santa Barbara Thoro-CJreen dried lima beans 

Sports In limited. Oakland Sporting goods 

.Sta-Neet Corp. H'wood Plastic hair trimmer . 

30th & San Pablo Furniture Warehouse, Oakland. . . Furniture warehouse 

I Isier Cravat Co. Kingstrn. N. Y. Cravats . 

M. Werk ('<). Cinii. Wir\. Tag soap 



W. Karle Bothwell. N. ^ . 

C:oIeman-J<]nes. L. \. 

Sevmour Kamenv, N. Y'. 

J. M. Maihes. N.Y. 

Fuller & Smith & Ross. Chi. 

Ivan Hill. Chi. 

M. Belmont \er Standif Wash. 

Hart-<'onway. Rochtstii 

Saitimieras. Chi. 

L. W. Roush t:o, Detroit 

Ellington. .N. \. 

Gallup. Indianapolis 

M. Belmont \'er Standig. Wash. 

Needham & (;rohmann. .N. M . 

Krupnick. St. L<iuis 

Hart -(.'on way. Rochestir 

\d Fried. Oakland 

W ilhelm-Laughlin-WilMifi. Dallas 

Ad Fried. Oakland 

Kastor. Farrell. Chcsley & Clifford. N. V. 

Robert B. (irady. N. Y. 

Walter Kaner. N. Y'. 

Puane Jines. N. Y'. 

Peck. N. Y. 

William Kester. H'wood 

Ward. Macdonald & Stagg. S. F. 

l\rwerda-Boone. N. Y'. 

Harry .M. Frost. Boston 

Sullivan, Stauffer. Colwell & Bayles, N. Y'. 

Federal, N. Y. 

M. Belmont Ver Standig, Wash.. D. C. 

Krupnick. St. Louis 

Deutsch & Shea. -N. Y. 

C. Willard Meyer. Milw. 

Bri.sacher. Van N'orden. N.Y. 

Tracv. Kent. N. Y'. 

AiUn & Reynolds, Omaha 

Slans & Maury. N. Y. 

M. Belmont \'er Standig, Wash., D. C. 

^ iking. N. Y. 

BriKike. Smith. French & Dorrance, Detroit 

M. Belmont \ er Standig. Wash. 

M. Belmi-.nt %er Standig, Wash. 

Pat Patrick, <;iendale. C:alif. 

Jt>hn Freiburg. L. .\. 

Waller Weir. N. Y. 

McCann-Erickson, L. .\. 

Ad Fried. Oakland 

Mavirs. L. A. 

Ad Fried, Oakland 

Fcrwcrda-Boone. N. 'W 

R;'lph II. Joiu s. Ciiu i. 



Sp>OH4xt^ PenAxutml QUa^u^ei. 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Ihirol.l .1. lUeb.s 
Da\id R. Compton 
Louis F. Czufin 

John A. Dnh.son 
W illiam R. Mason 

Walter Mayer 
L. It. Jack Nelson 
Ouentin D. Pierce 

Jerry (,)uimby 
(;. Reed .Schreiner 
I arle II. Selby 
Lewis W . .Selnieier 
\ inceni .S. Sliallow 
ILrlxri H luvl.ir 



Coitimonwealth Kdison Co. Chi., asst adv mgr 

Essex adv svc div. .Safeway .Stores, S. F. 

Pan .\merican World .Mrways, N. Y'.. asst to adv 

mgr 
Maltex Co, Burlington, Vt. 
William B. Remington, Springfield, Mas.s.. group 

dir 
.Squirt (;o, L. ,\.. adv mgr 

.Sweets Co of Amer, lloboken. N. J., exec vp 
(^>nsolidated Royal CMiemical Corp, Chi., adv. 

sis dir 
Roy S. Dursiine. N. Y. 
I' .S .Steel Corp of Delaware, avsi adv dir 
.\merican Home Foods, N. ^. 
Rol>ert .\comb. Cine, vp 

Nurlhwcslcrn Yeast Co. Chi., sis. adv exec 



Same, adv mgr 

Safewa.v .Stores. Dallas district, adv mgr 

Pan .\merican-C;race .Mrways, N. Y"., adv mgr 

-Same, adv. sis prom dir 

(ieyer, Cornell & Newell. N. Y'., acct exec 

Carnation Co. L. .\., a.sst adv mgr 
Bianchi Co, N. Y'.. adv. pub rel head 
Jatiues Mfg Co, Chi., sis. adv mgr 

Helena Rubinstein. N. Y., adv dir 

Same, adv dir 

C 

F 

Nutri-(^>la Iniernaiional Corp. N. ^ . 

Consolid:ll< >l Ko\;il ( bcntit :il ( <.rp 



iilllll.l r\u 111 ■■:m ^ 111 . ."v. «.. ,i%j * uii 

'Name, adv dir 

larr-Consolidatcd Biscuit Co. W ilkcs-Barre. gi 
Ksiaie lleairola Div. Noma Electric Corp. II 

k ...-I «'.l.. l.....r.. ..,:... ...I #'..PH V \ ...I. .Ilr 



'n nN. ait\ dir 
amilion. ().. 



adv dir 
bi . sK. adv dir 



{Please turn to page 58) 




I 



WIIL CI YE YOU' 



COMPLETE 



PICTURE OF RADIO IN IOWA! 



Now you can know the listening habits of Iowa people so well that you can instanti 
tell what stations are preferred in each county as well as in the State as a whole I 



Now you can know what percentage of Iowa people prefer each station heart! in th 
State — how many hours are spent with "listened-to-most" stations as compared will 
"heard-regularly'" stations — what stations are preferred for NcMScasts and Farm Pro 
grams. Now you can know what percentage of the total Iowa audience listens to th 
radio, at any quarter-hour period of the day — with figures broken down by station 
and counties. 



These and many other vital facts are covered in the 1947 Iowa Radio Audience Survej 
by Dr. F. L. Whan of the University of Wichita. This invaluable work is based on inter 
views representing one of every 73 radio homes in Iowa. It is a MUST for every executiv 
interested in Iowa advertising and merchandising. 

A copy is yours for the asking. Use the coupon TODAY! 



P 



THE 1947 IOWA RADIO AUDIENCE 
SURVEY COVERS: 

Station Preferences in Iowa 

News Preferences 

Farm Program Preferences 

Public Attitude Toward Transcriptions 

vs. Live Broadcasts 
Analysis of Audience by Time Periods 
Program Preferences 
Program Material Preferences 

• • • 

This authoritative Study contains many maps and 
charts — breakdowns by age, sex, place of residence, etc. 
It will be the most valuable book in your radio file. 
>X rite for your copy NOW ! 



fi WHO For Iowa PLUS! + 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

B. J. Palmer, President . . P. A. Loyet, Resident Mgr. 

Free & Peters, Inc., National Representatives 




I 




Mr. Sponso r: j 



& 

and cut out the 
Grand Canyon? 

That's practically the W-W-D-C 
story. Started small. It grew and 
grew. Today it has carved a 
listening audience out of this big 
Washington market that's the 
envy of a lot of people in radio. 
Alert programming, keeping an 
eye on the future, and all-around 
hustle have done the job. 
You can have W-W-D-C— AM 
or W-W-D-C— FM. Whatever 
you want in Washington, keep 4 
important call letters in your 
mind — W-W-D-C! It's the sales- 



Only one other station in 

Washington has more 

loyal listeners 

WWDC 

AMFM-The D. C. Independent 




>l€»rris ^iliapir«» 



President, Tiimount Clothing Company 

Wn the midst of runaway markups in the men's clothing business, Morris 
Shapiro and his Trimount Clothing have done much to salvage lower 
cost selling in men's suits. Shapiro is sincere in believing that the con- 
sumer should get a break. Volume manufacturing of a basic line is the 
answer (Trimount is the world's largest men's clothing manufacturer)- 
and to radio goes credit for sustaining the demand and building good-will 
for Trimount's Clipper Craft Clothes. Virtually all the Trimount ad 
budget of $450,000 a year goes for radio, selling the name of Clipper Craft 
on 275 Mutual stations each Sunday via the classic whodunit Sherlock 
Holmes. 

Toda>', in a market once again veering toward the buyer, more than 
1200 store outlets in his "voluntary chain" are doing well with the Clipper 
Craft line, and there is a growing waiting list. Imaginative, unassuming, 
promotion-conscious Shapiro has done an uphill job too in selling outlet 
stores on the use of radio. Nearly 200 of them place cut-ins on Sherlock 
and many now have programs of their own. 

The eight >ears that Trimount has been a network advertiser have 
taught Shapiro many lessons. He has discovered that style-conscious 
women are a big fartor in the selection of men's clothes, so commercials 
are pitched at them too. He knows that radio campaigns must be mer- 
chandized to dealers and public at point of sale (Shapiro supervises this 
himself) to be properly effective. Above all, he has found out that one of 
the basic factors of success in air advertising is "continuity of effort." 
Where eight years ago Trimount advertised via Dorothy Thomf>son on a 
spring-and-fall schedule only, Shapiro and Sherlock Holmes are today 
teamed to sell on a 52-week basis. 



18 



SPONSOR 






RADIO'S GREATEST f 
ZIV STAR SHOW • i 
RADIO'S CREATES^ 
AR SHOW • A vi 
RADIO'S GREAT^j 
ZIV STAR SHO' 
RADIO'S ^ 



^PER-DOLLAR BUY! •RADIO'S GREA 

RSHOW • A ZIV STAR SHOW • 

K^DOLLAR BUY! •RADIO'S GREA 

A ZIV STAR SHOW • A ZIV 

^'^R BUY! •RADIO'S GREA 




II I'" • 



ARS 

RADIO'S b; 
[AR SHOW ^ 

RADIO'S or 

[AR SHOW i 
RADIO'S GH 

AR SHOW i 

RADIO'S GR 




A ZIV 

'S GREA 
• A ZIV 



ADIO'S GREA 



EXC'T'lt.'^sioW 



«^^'?nVENTURE- 



'^^'^I/nETECTlVE 



^^:^ 




I'ER-DOLLAR BUY!^»^ 



rziv 



Tar SHOW • A ZIV STAR SHOW 
"^T POINT-PER-DOLLAR BUY!^RADI( S^IREA 



IHE PROOF IS IN THE RATINGS I 



Co/^s^r&^ny . m\% all com 

" STATIONS FROM' 




rt>' 



.ove 






tes^ 



CO 



^^^"cott^P^^' 



•\\s 






TORONTO 

THURSDAY, 9:30 p.m., CfUB 

14.6 

ii^ Dominoles the dominion 
...more than twice com- 
peting top comic'j rating. 
(Elliott. Hoynei-Ocl., 1946) 









^BH 



•ORTLAND 

SUNDAY, 1 2:30 p.m., WCAN 

14.0 

Maine attraction in Port- 
land... 57. 8% Share of 

Audience. 

(Hooper-Oct. -Feb. ,1946.7) 






MNGSTOWN 



THURSDAY, 7:30 



207 



P-ni., WKBN 



KjyORUAN? 



^4% Sha 



'MONDAY, 6.30 



'■e of Audi" 



nearesf 



^"^e . . . double 
--PeHfor.. o top-f)/ghf net- 



Seott 



14.1 



P f"., VVVVL 



o fon 



(HOOPER-FAU-W 



'NTER. 1946.47) 



n comperina „ ''""'"•"'°'or 
'""O't thr»» t» "o'lon 

'^----cj:.°r',,46-4. 



ETITION ^^ 




for o'^^over ^^'^\ 



On 




■"•fJ'sH 







- ^ 




I 



J^mf-muR " 

WSTON BlflcWf" 
''ROGRAMS 

AMRABLE 







'p. 



v., 



'^^^/^/SOAf 



ROAD . 



^'^CINNATI 



Ooo 



RANSCRIBED 
IR LOCAL AND 
REGIONAL 
SPONSORS! 



I 

T 




FRANK KATZENTINE 

I 
I 

I 

Announces the 'appointment of 

UIEED 

flriD compQn Y 

NEW YORK . BOSTON • CHICAGO • DETROIT • SAN FRANCISCO • ALTANTA • HOLLYWOOD 

I 
I 
I 
I 

AS NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



• I 



5000 UlRTTS-OnV DIRL 1360 1000 UinTTS-mCHT 




16 



SPONSOR 



Vol. 2 • No. 1 




November 1947 



MILK 



on the air 



Manyjprograms 

being broadeast, 
but there's no 

ansiver to ivhat 
makLes 'em buy 




over-all 



The dairy industry is a 
$7,000,000,000 business which 
hasn't found a general broadcast program 
formula that sells milk. A number of 
sponsors still cling to the illusion that 
kiddie shows are the milk answer. Most 
dairies, however, have by now discovered 
that tiny tots are fickle, just as the 
bakery field has uncovered the fact that 
business inspired by children goes to the 
firm currently offering the biggest gift or 
premium {Bread and Cake Story, April 
'47 sponsor). 

Milk basically is a locally-produced' 
and'merchandised product. The local 



angle is frequently insured by ordinances 
and state laws restricting the "milk 
shed," i.e., the area in which milk may be 
produced for sale in a certain locality. 
There are only two great national dairy 
organizations, National Dairy and Bor- 
den. Together they handle only 17 per 
cent of the milk produced, the former 
processing 1 1 and the latter 6 per cent. 
They operate as dairy organizations in 33 
states and do a combined gross business 
of $1,150,000,000 a year. This includes 
cheese, condensed milk, ice cream, and 
instant coffee, to mention a few Borden 
products, and cheese, mayonnaise, and a 



17 




|l^ ?;. r * BROADCASTING FROM HOUVWOL 



EVERY 
WEDNESDAY 

NIGHT AT 

Sponsored by Abbotts Dairies 



DON'T MISS 



FavoriteSto''y 



Sundays 5-5:30 p.m. 



560 fil4( ON TOUI DIAL 



Doll; Madison 

ICE CHAM 

»ojr (awonle 'ice cream' siory 



g^ PHILADELPHIAS flMEST RADIO JHOI¥/ ^ 




WFIL 




PRESENTED BY ABBOTTS DAIRIESimc 



e¥£RYSATURDAY%'9'^^kyii 



Three types o\ dairy shows on one station — (top) network cooperative program, (center) a 
transcribed dramatic program, (bottom) a locally produced teen-age opportunity "hour" 



host of other items that bear Kraft or Seal- 
test labels for National Dairy. 

Most retail dairies are independently 
owned, although both Borden and some 
of the National Dairy-owned regional 
companies operate a limited number of 
retail stores. In cities retail dairies special- 
ize in milk, eggs, and cheese but carry a 
full line of groceries to compete with the 
general grocer who handles a full line of 
dairy prtxlucts. It is almost the only 
field, aside from laundries, in which home 
delivery service continues as a basic mer- 
chandising ingredient. It costs more to 
have milk delivered but the milk bottle 
beside the door has survived all techno- 
logical advances. The ideal program 
should be one that reaches the whole 
family and concentrates on the woman in 
the home, since the housewife does 92 
per cent of all the buying of dairy items. 

Because a substantial part of the dairy 
industry realizes that it must reach the 
families of the area it serves, and sell the 
women, adult and nighttime dairy pro- 
grams predominate in the cross-section 
survey which is the basi« of the industry 
chart published with this report. This 
index indicates that 83.5 of the dairies re- 
porting used adult programs of varying 
appeals on the air while only 16.5 slanted 
their vehicles to youngsters. 

Many of the adult programs are slanted 
directly at the ladies, 18.7 per cent being 
in this category. Next in use by dairies 
are spot announcements, 16.5 per cent 
using them. Then come news broad- 
casts, with 15.3. Musicals representing 



In Chicago, Bowman Dairies presents "Musical In BuFfalo, for the past three years. Bossy has In New York, Sheffield Farms filled Madison 
Milkwagon" with Dinning Sisters and Tommy been jingliring over five stations with doggerel Square Garden for one WOR broadcast of 
Port on WGN and at hundreds of functions like that on this Rich's Ice Cream card "Guess Who " with Happy Felton and gimmicks 





/m Qossy, 

Me wonderfu/ cow- 

U^^"' ''n tel//nr| 
\\QKX how- 

Mq rich milk and 
cream mo/ce 

RICHS 

ICE CREAM 

. Better trql^/CH'S 
r'iQht now/ 




18 



SPONSOR 



National Dairies have three network programs that gather consistent listening and do a job for 
the KraFt and Sealtest trade-marks. (Right top) "Sealtest Village Store" cast, Dave Willock, Jack 
Carson, Frank De Vol and Eve Arden. (Middle) Bing (with Bob Burns) who made the "Kraft 
Music Hall" a listening must. (Bottom) "Gildersleeve" with a couple of his supporting cast 



just 7.7 per cent of the sponsor cross- 
section. The balance of the dairy pro- 
grams using adult appeal are divided 
among sports, novelty, disk jockey, talks, 
and adult drama, with no type of program 
particularly predominant. 

The use of musical programs has in- 
creased recently because transcription 
organizations have been making available 
better-produced shows. Frederic Ziv's 
Barry Wood, Wayne King, and Guy 
Lombardo recorded programs are of net- 
work calibre and are constantly spotted 
on network affiliates (even on owned-and- 
operated stations) without the listener's 
feeling that they are anything but top- 
drawer live programs, and this despite the 
necessary FCC announcement stating 
that the program is transcribed. The in- 
crease in the use of other adult programs 
is in good part traceable to the fact that 
the networks are making available as 
local commercial programs shows that 
were formerly sponsored coast-to-coast. 
Programs like Kate Smith, Abbott and 
Costello, Injormation Please, are now open 
to dairies — and they're buying them. 

Because dairies are constantly, almost 
daily, in touch with their customers, they 
are very sensitive to their listening likes. 
A route man can hardly make his daily 
round without getting some reaction to 
the broadcast advertising of his firm. It 
took Rich's of Buffalo only a few weeks to 
discover that their Bossy jingles were 
going over. Rich's have been using 80 
spots a week (20- and 1 5-second spots) on 
all five Buffalo stations for three years. 
The result has been a profitable ice cream 
business for Rich's and a brand name 
acceptance which is tops in their city. 
Like all jingles, the Rich's "Bossy" effort, 
with Bossy the cow singing the advertis- 
ing, has been both praised and damned. 
In the three years it's estimated that well 
over 2,500 letters about the jingle have 
been written either direct to Rich's or to 
the five stations. The complimentary 
letters have been more numerous than the 
condemnatory epistles and a fourth-grade 
class at Elmwood-Franklin School chose 
the jingle as its class song. The idea was 
created by a local producer, Robert 
Mendelson, and thus far hasn't spread 
beyond Buffalo. 

The biggest dairy state is Wisconsin, 
whose fanners collect some $508,593,000 
annually for dairy products. It produces ' 
nearly half the cheese, one-third the 
evaporated milk, and one-eleventh of the 
nation's butter. It's natural, therefore, 

NOVEMBER 1947 



that the broadcasting stations go all out 
covering the major dairy gathering, the 
Wisconsin State Fair. Station WISN 
(Milwaukee), for instance, scheduled 18 
remotes from the fair grounds and inter- 
viewed the State Fair Queen, who after- 
wards went to Atlantic City to compete 
for the "Miss America" title. (She 
didn't win.) Jack Carson, who has taken 
over the proprietorship of the Sealtest 
Village Store on NBC, made one of his 
first public appearances for his new spon- 
sor at the Wisconsin State Fair (see cover 
picture) and WISN had him on the air 
and made plenty of news for Sealtest in 
Milwaukee. Milk-producing cows are 
always a feature at state fairs and local 
stations find remotes from these fairs 
good public service. 

Pennsylvania ranked fifth among the 
states in dairy-produced farm income in 
1946, with a total of $216,881,000. It has 
a number of locally-produced dairy pro- 
grams that have achieved unusual suc- 
cess. In Philadelphia Teeri'Age Time is 
sponsored by Abbotts over WFIL. This 
is, as the name indicates, a typical teen- 
age gathering with opportunities for 
"new" talent, etc. The program won a 
CCNY Award for the "most effective 
direct-selling sponsored radio program" 
in the 1946-47 competition and one of the 
regulars on the program appeared on the 
first Adam Hat Big Break broadcast over 
NBC. Abbotts doesn't, however, depend 
solely on its teen-age selling but also 
sponsors the ABC cooperative program, 
Abbott & Costello. It plans {A&C is a new 
effort for Abbott's) to tie in with all 
motion pictures starring the pair of 
comics when they play Philadelphia 
theaters and already has used point-of- 
sale posters, local magazine advertising, 
car cards, as well as newspaper publicity 
and advertising. Abbotts doesn't expect 
100 per cent results even of these two 
major program efforts and uses an amazing 
spot broadcasting schedule with 30-word 
station breaks on 



KYW, Philadelphia 

WCAU, Philadelphia 

WFIL, Philadelphia 

WBAB. Atlantic City 

WSAN, .\llentown 

WRAW, Reading 

WDEL. Wilmington, Del. 

WSNJ, Bridgeton. N. J. 

WHP, Harrisburft 



Abbotts have real comp2tition in 
Philadelphia where one of National 
Dairy's most active local companies, 




DIDN'T SELL 



"45 Minutes in 
Hollywood" 




Siipplcc-Wills'Jones, does an active selling 
of their National Sealtest program and 
uses considerable local black-and-white 
copy. 

Chicago, where at one time the dairy 
business was the subject of gang wars, and 
where Borden, Bowman, and Meadow- 
moor drivers were once involved in 
blood> riots, now does its competing on 
the air. Bowman's does not depend upon 
a national tie-up. It goes out after the 
male milk drinker by sponsoring 100- 
word announcements preceding the Chi- 
cago Cubs and White Sox baseball games 
from April through September each year 
over WJJD and WIND. It has also 
sponsored the Musical MHku,'a)>(m con- 
tinuously since 1 942 and over WM AQ since 
1 945. The program, broadcast daily from 
11:30 to 12 noon, is basically musical. 
The cast, The Dinning Sisters, Tommy 



Port, and a four-piece musical ensemble 
headed b>' Jack Fascinato, each day 
serenade someone selected by a listener. 
Bowman makes the cast available to 
entertain local civic and fraternal groups 
free as a public service gesture. The 
Dinning Sisters, being nationally known, 
are featured in this part of Bowman's 
promotional activity. 

Chicago's Capitol Dairy was one of the 
first organizations to present a block- 
programed mystery series using WIND 
for a five-a-week broadcast of NBC-Radio 
Recording's The Hawitwg Hour and 
Weird Circle. The series was called 
Capitol Mysteries and had run for 13 
weeks when the dair>' changed its air 
spending to underwrite a children's pro- 
gram featuring contests and give-aways. 
Give-aways are a sure way to reach 
(Please turn to page 55) 



SELLING 



Leo Reisman 




Tommy Riggs 



Be« Lilli 




Borden has had many shows in lis years 
on the air but none of them have been 
winners except "County Fair" which is low 
cost and a great promotional program. 
Typical of its stunts was the cow-lifting 
episode of 1946. It has won awards 
and brought Borden's entire advertising 
account to Kenyon & Eckhardt agency 



20 




XOVEiMBER: 3IILK & IIAIKY l»RO»l ( TS 



SPONSOR 



ABBOTTS DAIRIES INC. 
PHILA. 



AERL'S MILK PLANT, 
WACO. TEX. 



ANSELMO DAIRY, 

PORTERVILLE. CALIF. 



ASHLAND DAIRIES, 
LEXINGTON. KY. 



BALIAN ICE CREAM CO, 
LOS ANGELES 



Richani A. Foley, 
Phila, 



BANNER CREAMERY. 
SWEETWATER, TEX. 

BEATRICE CREAMERY CO, 
TULSA 



BEATRICE FOODS CO, 
TOPEKA 



BLOSSOM DAIRY CO, 
CHARLESTON, W. VA. 



BLUE MOON FOODS. 
THORP. Wise. 



BORDEN CO, N. Y. 



BORDEN'S DAIRY, 
TROY. N. Y. 



BOWMAN DAIRY CO, CHI 



BRAINARD COTTONWOOD 
DAIRY. SALT LAKE CITY 



BREYER ICE CREAM CO, 
PHILA. 



BROUGHTON'S DAIRY. 
PARKERSBURG. W. VA. 



BROWN ICE CREAM & MILKCO 
BOWLING GREEN. KY. 



CAROLINE DAIRY. 
GREENVILLE. N. C. 



CASCADE MILK PRODUCTS 
CO. YAKIMA. WASH 



CLOVER CREAMERY CO, 
RADFORD. VA. 



CLOVER CREAMERY CO. 
ROANOKE. VA. 



CLOVERLEAF DAIRY, 
SALT LAKE CITY 



Reincke, Mever & Finn, 
Chi. 



PRODUCT 



Milk, ice cream 



Milk 



Milk, milk products 



Milk 



Ice cream 



Milk 



Milk, dairy products 



Dairy products 



PROGRAMS 



Teen Age Time, .Sat 9-9:30 am. WFIL fPhila.) 
Abbott & Costcllo. Wed 9-9:30 pm. WFIL (Phila.) 
Marjorie Mills ProKram, participations twice 
wkly, Now Engl. Network 



Dick Tracy, MTWTF 4:45-5 pm, WACO (Waco) 



Spots, breaks, B sla 



Ethel & Albert, MTWTF 2:15-2:30 pm, WLAP 

(Lexineton) 



Kenny Baker (e.t.), as scheduled, KHJ (Los 
.^neeles) 



Kate Smith Speaks, MTWTF 12-12:15 pm, 
KXOX (Sweetwater) 



Dick Tracy, MTWTF 4:45-5 pm, KOME (Tulsa) 



Cedric Foster, 



Milk, ice cream 



Cheese 



MTWTF 1-1:15 
(Topeka) 



pm, KTOP 



Young Stars of Tomorrow, 30-min wkly, WCHS 

(Charleston) 



Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
New York 



Youne 4 Rubicam 



All products 
Cheese, instant coffee, others 



Dairy delivery, products 



Milk, ice cream 



J. Walter Thompson, 
Chi. 



McKee & Albright, 
Phila. 



Gordon Smith, 
Yakima ■ 



COAST CURRIE CO, L. A. 



COBLE DAIRY PRODUCTS 
LEXINGTON. N. C. 



COMMUNITY ICE CREAM CO, 
OGDENS URG. N. Y. 



CORBIN MILK CO, 
CORBIN. KY 



COTTAGE CREAMERY CO, 
CANTON. 0. 



DAIRYBELL CREAMERY. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

DANVILLE DAIRY CD, 
DANVILLE. VA. 



EMBASSY DAIRY, 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



FAIRMOUNT FOODS CO. 
DEVILS LAKE. N. DAK 



GILFORD DAIRY CORP, 
GREENSBORO. N. C. 



GREENE'S CREAMERY. 
AUGUSTA. GA 



Milk, butter, milk products 



Milk, milk products 



Ice cream 



Milk 



Milk, butter, cheese, ice cream 



Milk 



Dairy products 



Milk 



Milk, dairy products 



Milk, m Ik products 



Ice cream 



Milk, ice cream 



Ice cream 



Milk 



Housewives Protective League, participations, 
WBBM (Chi.) 



Borden Program, Fri 9-9:30 pm, CBS, 157 sta 
County Fair, Sat 1:30-2 pm, CBS, 161 sta 



SpoU. KTIP (Porterville) 



Live, e.t. 10-1.5-min shows, 13 sta 



Dick Tracy, MTWTF 4:45-5 pm, WGLN (Glens 
Falls. N. Y.) 



Musical Milkwagon, MTWTF 11:30-12 n est, 
WMAO(Chi.) 



Top of the Mornine. MTWTFS 30-min as sched- 
uled, KUTA (Salt Lake City) 



CBS News, MTWTF 8-8:15 am, WPAR (Park- 
ersburg, W. Va.) 



Captain Midnight, MTWTF 5:30-5:45 pm, 
WLBJ (Bowling Green) 



Hop Hamgan, MTWTF 5-5:15 pm, WGTC 

(Greenville) 



Nine O'clock News, MTWTF 9-9:15 am, KIMA 

(Yakima) 



Cedric Foster, MTWTF 1-1:15 pm, 2 sta 



Dick Tracy, MTWTF 4:45-5 pm. WSLS 
" (Roanoke) 



Singin' Sam (e.t.), MTWTF 15-min as scheduled, 
KUTA (Salt Lake City) 



Norma Young Program, MTWTF 30-rain as 
scheduled, KHJ (Los Angeles) 



Kate Smith Speaks, MTWTF 12-12:15 pm, 
WTOB (Winston-Salem) 



Hop Harrigan, MTWTF 5-5:15 pm, WSLB 

(Ogdensburg) 



Butter 



Milk, dairy products 



GUSTAFSCN ICECREAM&OAIRY 
CO. RICE LAKE. WISC 

GUYON CREAMERY CO, 
HUNTINGTON, W VA 



Milk, cream, butter, ice cream 



Milk, dairy products 



Mil •, butter, ice cream 



Milk, milk products 



Milk, cream 



Milk, ice cream, ices 



Milk 



Kate Smith Speaks. MTWTF 12-12:15 pm, 
WCTT (Corbin) 



Winner Take All, MTWTF 4:30-5 pm, KQW 
(San Francisco) 



Sportscast, 15-min wkly, WBTM (Danville) 



Johnson Family, MTWTF 4:15-4:30 pro, WOL 
(Washington) 



Kate Smith Speaks, MTWTF 11-11:15 am est, 
KDLR (Devils Lake) 



Dairy Market News, MTWTF 12-12:03 pm est, 
KDLR 



Frank Parker Show (e.t.), 15-min as scheduled, 
WBIG (Greensboro) 



Cecil Brown, MTWTF 10-10:15 am, WJMC 
(Rice Lake) 



Cecil Brown, MTWTF 10:15 am, WPLH (Hunt- 
ington) 



Spots, breaks, eastern mkts 



Spots, breaks, KUTA 



Courtesy spots, WTOB 



Spots, WHBC (Canton) 



Spots, WBBQ (Augusta) 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



PRODUCT 



PROGRAMS 



H P HobD & SONS. 
BOSTUN 


ll:ir..MC»bot. 

lilMtOll 


Milk, cream 





SpoU. breaks. New Engl, mkts 


IRVINMEAObW COLO DAIRY. 
/ANESVIILE U. 




Milk 


Mil Majesty the Baby (e.t.), 5-min as scheduled, 
WHIZ(Zan«viUe) 




HOME OAIKY. 

PARKErilBURC. W VA 




Milk, cheeae 





Spots, WPAR (Parkersburg) 


JERSEY GOLD CREAMERY. 
SHittVEPURT LA 




Milk, dairy products 


Baukhage, MTWTF 1-1:15 pm, KRMD (Shreve- 
port) 




KrtAFT FOODS CO CHI 


J. Walter Tnompeon, Chi. 


Velveeta, other product! 
Cream cheeae, salad producta 


Kraft Music Hall, Th 9 9:30 pm. NBC, 139 sta 
Village i^lon; Th 6:30-7 pni pst, .NBC, 15 Pac sta 






Xprdbam, Louiii i. Brorby, 
Cm. 


Parkay Margarine, Kraft 
Dinner 


Great Gildcrsleevc, Wed S:30-« pm, NBC, 125 sta 




LEROY DAIRY CO, 

WILLIAMSON. W VA 




Milk 


Hop Harrigan, MTWTF 5-5:15 pm, WBTH 

(Williamson) 




LILY ICE CREAM CO. 
CADSOEN ALA 




Ice cream 


Dick Tracy, MTWTF 4:45-5 pm, WGNH 
(Gadsden) 




LINOALE DAIRIES. 

ROANCKE RAPIDS, N. C. 




Milk, ice cream 


Dick Haymes Show (records), WCBT 
(Roanoke Rapids) 




^ MEADOW GOLD DAIRIES, 
-9^ HUNTSVILLE. ALA. 





Milk 


Dick Tracy. MTWTF 4:45-5 pm, WHBS (Hunt«- 

viUe) 




MIDWEST DAIRY PRODUCTS CO. 
JACKSON. TENN 





Milk, ice cream 


Baukhage, MTWTF 1-1:15 pm, WTJS (Jackson) 


• 


MURRAY BROS FOOD PROD- 
UCTS CO AUGUSTA. GA 




Borden's products 


Inside of Sports, MTWTF 7:45-8 pm. WBBQ 
(Augusta) 





NATIONAL DAIRY PRODUCTS 
CORP. N Y 


McEee ft Albright, 
Pnila. 


Sealtest milk and ice cream 


ViUage Store, Tb 9:30-10 pm, NBC, 75 sta 


Periodic spot nmimigfrn 


NOBLES DAIRY. 

PORTERVILLE. CALIF 




Milk, milk products 




Spots. KTIP (Porterville) 


OAK FARMS DAIRY, 
FT WORTH 




Milk, milk products 


Tommy Dorsey (e.t.), MTWTF, 60-min, KFJZ 
(Ft. Worth) 




OTTO MILK CO. PITTSBURGH 




Milk and cream 




SpoU. KDKA (Pittsburgh) 


PACE DAIRY CO. TOLEDO 




Milk, dairy products 


Abbott ft Costello. 9-9:30 pm, WTOL (Toledo) 




PARKERSBURG CREAMERY CO, 
PAKKERSBURG. W. VA. 




Milk, cheese 


Kenny Baker (e.t.), MTWTF 6:30-6:45 pm, 
WPAR (Parkersburg) 




PENN DAIRIES, 
LANCASTER. PA 




Milk, dairy products 


Weather forecast jingles (e.t.), as scheduled, 
WGAL (Lancaster) 




PHILADELPHIA CERTIFIED MILK 
PRODUCERS. PHILA 


Clements, Pbila. 


Certified milk 


Emmanuelina Pizzuto, Sun 12:30-1 pm, WFIL 
(Phila.) 





PHILADELPHIA DAIRY PROD- 
UCTS CO. PHILA. 


.\drian Bauer, Phila. 


Dolly Madison Ice Cream 


Favorite Story (e.t.). Sun 5-5:30 pm. WFIL 

(Phila.) 




PLAINS CO-OP. 
PLAINVIEW. TEX. 




Milk 


Cedric Foster. MTWTF 1-1:15 pm, KVOP 

(Plainview) 




PLATTSBURGH DAIRY, 
PLATTSBURGH, N Y. 




Milk, cheese, cream 


Baukhage, MTWTF 1-1:15 pm, WMFF (PUtts- 
burgh) 




PRODUCERS' DAIRY, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 




Milk, dairy products 


Tennessee Jed, MTWTF 5-5:15 pm, WCVS 

(Springfield) 




RICH ICE CHEAM CU, 
BUFFALO 




Rich Ice C>eam 






ROCHESTER COOPERATIVE, 
ROCHESTER. MINN. 




Milk 


Weather forecast jingles (e.t.), as scheduled, 
KROC Rochester) 




Ru^tBUU CHEAMERY CO, 
PLATTSBURGH. N. Y 





Milk, cheese, cream 


To the Women, Time Uul, as scheduled, WMFF 

(Plattsburgh) 




SEALE-LILY ICE CREAM CO, 
JACKSON. MISS 




Ice cream 


Dick Tracy, MTWTF 4:45-5 pm, WSLI (Jackson) 





SHEFMELD fAHMJ, N. Y. 


iN. W. Ayer 


Milk, cream 


Guess Who. Sat 7-7:30 pm. WOR (N. Y.) 





SUU1HEKN OAlhlEV. INC, 
WA^HINGIbN. D. C 


i\icKee 4 Albright, 
PtuU. 


Ice cream, milk 


Frank Parker Show (e.t.i. 15-niin as scheduled, 
WRNL (Richmond. Va.) 


Spots, breaks, eastern mkta 

• 




Smiths of Hollywood (e.t.), 30-min wkly, WLEE 
(Richmond) 




SUNDARD BRANDS.JNC, 
NEW YORK 


J. Walter 'roompson, 
New York 


Sneliord Cbeese 


Fred Allen Show, Sun 8:30-9 pm, NBC, .143 

stations 
One Man's Family, Sun 3:30-4 pm, NBC, 144 

stations 




STURTEVANT DAIRY PROD- 
UCTS CO. MOLINE, ILL. 




Milk 


Kate Smith Speaks, MTWTF 12-12:15 pm, 
WQLA (MoUne) 




SWIFT AND CO., 
CHICAGO 


.Needbam, Louia & Broruy, 
Chicago 


Swift's Ice Cream 




E. t. spots, breaks. 
49 sUtions 


SYLVAN SEAL MILK CO. 
PHIU. 


Al Paul LeltoD, 
Pbila. 


Milk, cream, cream cheese 


Kate Smith Speaks. .MTWTF 12-12:15 pm. WIP 

(Phila.) 




TILLAMOOK COUNTY CREAM. 
EBY. TILLAMOOK. ORE. 


botalord, Constantine ft 
(iardner, Portland 


Cbeese 


Bennie Walker's Tillamook Kitchen, Sat 9:45-10 
am pst, -NBC. 7 Pac sta 




WALKER CREAMERY CO. 
WARREN. PA 




Ice cream 


Kale Smith Speaks, MTWTF 12-12:15 pm. 
WNAF (Warren) 




WALNUT GROVE DAIRY, 
CLARKSVILLE. TENN. 





Milk 


Kate Smith Speaks, .MTWTF 12-12:15 pm, 
WJZM (Clarksvillel 




WAHKEN COUNTY 0AI8Y 
ASSN. WARREN, PA. 




Milk, milk products 




Spol«, WNAE (Warren) 


WASHINGTON CREAMERY, 
SEATTLE 




Alilk, dair.\ products 


Kaltenbom, MTWTF 7:45-8 pm. KOMO 

(Seattle) 




WEST END DAIRY, 
CHARLESTON. S C. 




Milk, milk products 


Happy the Humbug (e.t.) as scheduled. WCSC 
(Charleston) 




WHITE ICE CREAM & MILK 
CO. WILMINGTON. N C 




Milk, ice cream 


Baukhage. MTWTF 1-1:15 pm. WMFD (Wil- 
mington) 




wiulmires dairy CO. 

< SYLACAUCA. ALA 





Milk, ICC cream 


Captain Midnight. MTWTF 5:30-5:45 pm, 
WFEB(Sylacauga) 




i ^Bi^M YAKIMA CIIY CREAMERY CO, 
^fflSSffli YAKIMA WASH 


\ aiict', ^ll<.lnamer, 
Yakima 


Milk, ice cream, butter, cheeae 


Houseparty. MTWTF 3:30-3:55 pm. KIMA 

(Yakima) 


Courtesy spots, KIMA (Yakim*) 


^^M YAKIMA CREAMERY. 
^^ YAKIMA WASH. 




Milk 


Winner Take All. MTWTF 4:30-5 pm. KTYW 

(Y'akimal 




^^> "TaKIMA DAIRYMEN'S ASSN. 
YAKIMA. WASH 




Milk, dairy products 


Dal« at Eigbt (records), as scheduled. twiMA 
(Y'akima) 


Courtesy spots. KIMA (Yakima) 



2SJL 

V 



IP 




...Dramatic Toles ol 
Ohio People end Places 

MOnOAYS • WEDnESDAVS ■ FBIDAYS 



(^ WTAM e/cT'elan^ 630 P. M. © 



(interesting 
each week 



9 WHIO^tfj/ituT6:30 P.M. © 



© WBNS eoiumius 6 30 P.M. © 



© WSTV5fewA5«wZ?630P.M. '^ 



O WSPD 'Toledo 7:30 P. M. © 



FMJ^«wyj!tow 8=00 P.M. ^ 



WHIZ 'ZoTtesville 

_UESTHUIL5:45,.. SAT.530p-r 



Ohio Bell-desisned institutional window displays are spotted not only in downtown Cleveland but throushout the entire Buckeye Stats 

Thej like Mr. Bell-in Ohio 



spot 



It's not easy to make a giant 
public utility human. Great 
corporations are, to the public, 
cold impersonal businesses without a local 
thought in their executives' heads. The 
Ohio Bell Telephone Company is both a 
virtual monopoly and, although incorpor- 
ated in Ohio, a wholly-owned subsidiary 
of the great Bell Telephone organization. 
When a radio program can take such a 
giant public utility and turn it into a part 
of the daily living and tradition of one 
state, Ohio, it underlines the capabilities 
of radio. It's the same use of commercial 
broadcasting that has turned the great 
du Pont empire from a munitions com- 
bine into a dispenser of "better things for 
better living through chemistry." 

The Ohio Story sponsored by Ohio Bell 
Telephone Company has been able in the 
short 1 1 months it has been on the air to 
relate the company to Ohio, to make the 
great utility part and parcel of daily Ohio 

NOVEMBER 1947 



living. The program fits the American 
Te'ephone and Telegraph subsidiary like 
a glove. It's not necessary for Ohio Bell 
to remind listeners that it serves Ohio and 
that although part of the great Bell 
family, its heart is still in the Buckeye 
State. Ohio Bell couldn't sponsor The 
Ohio Story if it wasn't. 

The program idea is very simple — to 
tell the story of the state, its past and 
present, to all who live in Ohio. It 
doesn't stop there. The tale of any state, 
city, or country includes the sordid and 
unpleasant as well as sweetness and light. 
Destructive as well as constructive 
thoughts are uncovered in the researching 
of a series such as this. To avoid, on the 
one hand, a vapid, PoUyanna approach, 
and, on the other, a depressing slant, is a 
creative challenge. It requires a writer 
whose approach is genuinely on the help- 
ful side. The advertising agency that 
sold Ohio Bell the idea of sponsoring the 



series, McCann-Erickson, didn't have to 
look for such a scripter because Frank 
Siedel, the writer, whose idea The Ohio 
Story is, honestly abhors muck. A nega- 
tive approach makes him sick to his 
stomach; it must have been his protot>pe 
who inspired the song Accentuate the 
Positive because he naturally does just 
that. Siedel likes people — thinks nothing 
of traveling 700 miles to check on a human 
interest story point that takes the nar- 
rator 20 seconds on the broadcast. His 
Ohio facts must be right — if they're not, 
thousands listening will set him right — 
but quick. 

Three times a week for 15 minutes The 
Ohio Story tells radio listeners of the 
Buckeye State about their state in a 
way that's inspirational, a way that 
makes them proud to be part of it. Ten 
stations forget their regular network 
affiliations for the 15 minutes to join a 
special Ohio web set up for this broadcast. 



S3 







Radio vet, Stuart Buchanan, returned to his home state to produce "The Ohio Story" 




r^tt, r>J. Untn «t :^_ 










Localized ads are r^n on individual shows Many stations place colorful lobby displays 




Ohio's State Legislature had a "command performance" of program in Allerton Hotel 



The 10-station network at present in- 
cludes: 

WHKK. Akron 
WHIJC. Canton 
\N lAM. Clcviland 
\N BNS. Columbus 
WHIO. Dayton 
WMOA. Marietta 
VVSTV. Steubenville 
WSPO. Toledo 
WKBN. Voufifiiitoun 
WHIZ, Zanesville 

and from time to time includes other sta- 
tions located in a town which is the locale 
of a particular Ohio Story. When Boom 
Town, Ohio, was broadcast, station WFIN 
was added to the chain because the boom 
town about which the broadcast was con- 
cerned is Findlay, Ohio, home of WFIN. 

Ohio Bell in the 1 1 months that it has 
sponsored The Ohio Story has gone a long 
way toward building a feeling within 
Ohio that it's a local phone company, al- 
though no attempt is made to confuse 
listeners into thinking it's an independent 
telephone corporation rather than the 
local arm of the great Bell system. 

The Ohio Story is a grass roots opera- 
tion but it makes no apologies to the 
finest coast-to-coast-produced epic. And 
that's no accident. After the idea was 
sold to the telephone company by Bob 
Dailey, McCann-Erickson's radio direc- 
tor, he set out to make certain that the 
program had the best talent available. 
Concerning the writer he had no question • 
— Frank Siedel was the program and his 
background gave ample evidence that he 
could turn out the three 1 5-minute scripts 
a week (he now has an assistant, William 
Ellis, who does a lot of the leg work for 
him). 

There was first the problem of a 
director. Top-flight producers aren't 
prone to leave New York, Chicago, or 
Hollywood for Cleveland where the pro- 
gram originates. Since the program is 
thrice weekly (MWFi it isn't feasible for 
anyone to commute from New York, 
Hollywood, or Chicago. And if an able 
producer, willing to take the show on. was 
found he'd have to be a man who wouldn't 
be yearning for the "big time " while 
doing the program. He'd also have to 
have the feel of the show — to like Ohio 
and not have his tongue in his cheek as he 
directed each broadcast. Stuart Bu- 
chanan is that man. For IS years he has 
produced radio programs and motion 
pictures, even acted on Broadway for a 
season. However, he is a graduate of 
Woostcr College and a native Ohioan. It 
didn't take Buchanan long to accept the 
offer to come home to Ohio to direct The 
Ohio Story. 

Once the director had been selected the 
{Please turn to page 57) 



84 



SPONSOR 




Music SELLS 
when Eddie Chase 

spins the platters! 



* 

EDDIE 

CHASE 

and his 

Make 

Believe 

Ballroom 

* 



In the Detroit Area, it's 



C K LW 

Adam J. ^ oung, Jr., Inc., Inc. Xatl. Pep. ^ Canadian Rep., H. X. Stovin & Co. 
J. E. Campeau, President Mutual System 



NOVEMBER 1947 



25 



Listeniiiir: Fall 1947 



!Vct\v«>rk ratiii^'K are loi%'er as sauson starts. 
I.uoal stations on uptrend. Al Jfilson is reiiuii«iin]u; 

Thursday ni|U(ht audience to a nei%^ hi^^h 



over-ail 



Perfect outdoor weather 
which lowered the available 
audience* and increased listening to local 
stations started off fall 1947 network pro- 
gram ratings lower than the>' were in the 
first week of October 1946. During the 
same period, listening in 82 cities in which 
new and /or block-programed stations 
were operating indicated an over-all in- 
crease of listening of 2 per cent. These 82 
cities include a majority (28) of the 36 
Hooperated areas. The local checking 



was done by an independent research 
organization (neither Hooper, Nielsen, 
nor Conlon) for one of the top 10 adver- 
tising agencies. The check-up was made 
on a coincidental basis (telephone calls 
while programs are on the air) so that the 
figures are comparable with Hooper's. 

Only one network program now on the 
air at the same time rs in 1946, on the 
same network, and having the same cast, 
writers, etc., increased its audience per- 
ceptibly during the first week of October. 



Amos 'n' Andy started off its 1947 season 
on Tuesday, October 7 with a 19.8, 
as against 17.7 in the first week in October 
1946, 2.1 points higher. Most of the 
other top programs in the Tuesday night 
NBC skein of block-programed comedy 
were a little off their 1946 ratings. The 
Fibber McGee and Molly debut (October 7) 
was down 1.9, from 24.9 to 23.0. Bob 
Hope on the same evening went from 
24.7 to 23.0. Moreover. Hope started 

"Peoplf til linnie mid Ihiis able to lune in a briHidriisi 













1946 








1947 




Program 


Web 


Time 


















Rating 


Rating 


Summei 


& Final 


Rating 


Rating 


Summer 


& Final 








Period 


Replacement 


Rating 


Period 


Replacement 


Rating 


Fred Allen 


NBC 


Sun 8:30-9 pm 


Oct 1-7 


85.6 


Tommy Dorsey 


11.6 


Oct 1-7 


16.9 







Amos & Andy 


NBC 


Tu 9-9:30 pm 


Oct 1-7 


17.7 




— 


Oct 1-7 


19.8 




— 


Gene Autry 


CBS 


Sun 7-7:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


4,7 




— 


Sep 1-7 


5.1 




— 


Jack Benny 


NBC 


Sun 7-7:30 pm 


Oct 1-7 


18.7 




— 


Oct 1-7 


18.6 


Jack Paar 


6.9 


Jack Berch 


NBC 


M-F 10-10:15 am 

(■47-11:30-11:45) 


Oct 1 -7 


8.6 




— 


Oct 1 -7 


3.4 




•~~ 


6er3en-McC«rthy 


NBC 


S.n 8-8:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


14.1 


Alec Templeton 


69 


Sep 1-7 


10.4 


Alec Templeton 


5.4 


Big Town 


CBS 


Tu 8-8:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


8.9 




— 


Sep 1-7 


7.6 




— 


Blondie 


CBS 


Sun 7:30-8 pm 


Sep 1-7 


7.6 




— 


Sep 1-7 


8.9 




— 


Fanny Bilct 


CBS 


F 8-8:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


9.3 




— 


Sep 1-7 


7.9 


Gordon MacRae 


16 


Burnt & Allen 


NBC 


Th 8:30-9 pm 


Sep 1-7 • 


11.9 


Meredith Willson 


4.3 


Sep 1-7 


7 1 


Langford-Dragon 


3 5 


Judy Canova 


NBC 


Sat 10-10:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


11.6 




— 


Sep 1-7 


9.5 




— 


Eddie Cantor 


NBC 


Th 10:30-11 pm 


Oct 1-7 


15.0 




— 


Oct 1-7 


18.0 


Blue Ribbon Music 


4.4 


Dr. Christian 


CBS 


W 8:30-8:55 pm 


Sep 1-7 


10.9 




— 


Sep 1-7 


6.4 




— 


Oime Photographer 


CBS 


Th 9:30-10 pm 


Sep 1-7 


7.9 




— 


Sep 1 -7 


7 3 




— 


Bins Crosby 


ABC 


W 10-10:30 pm 


Oct 15-81 


84.0 




— 


Oct 1-7 


15.5 




— 


Dennis Day 


NBC 


Th 7:30-8 pm 
(■47.W 8-8:30) 


Oct 1-7 


13.8 




— 


Oct 1-7 


18.6 




^~ 


Duffy's Tavern 


NBC 


W 9-9:30 pm 


Oct 1-7 


15.4 


McGarry & Mouse 


10.1 


Oct 1-7 


13.6 


Tex A Jinx 


8.8 


Jimmy Durante 


CBS 


F 9:30-10 pm 
(■47-W 10:30-11) 


Oct 1-7 


9.3 


Wayne King 


5.5 


Oct 1-7 


9.7 (NBC) 






Jimmy Fidler 


ABC 
MBS 


Sun 9:30.9:45 pm 
(•47-lO:30-10:45pm 
8:30-8:45) pm 


Sep 1-7 


7.8 






Sep 1-7 


5 8 (ABC) 
3.8 (MBS) 


Goodwin- Von Zell 


36 


Great Gildersleeve 


NBC 


W 8:30-9 pm 


Sep 15-81 


10.5 




— 


Sep 15-81 


98 




— 


Harvest of Stars 


NBC 


Sun 8:30-3 pm 


Sep 1-7 


46 




— 


Sep 1-7 


48 




— 


Bob Hawk 


CBS 
NBC 


M 7-7:30 pm 
(■47-M 10:30-11) 


Sep 1-7 


8.3 




— 


Sep 1-7 


6.7 




^" 


Dick Haymes 


CBS 


Th 9-9:30 pm 


Sep 15-81 


8 1 


A-L Summer Show 


6 1 


Sep 15-81 


7.7 


Lawyer Tucker 


5.8 


Bob Hope 


NBC 


Tu 10-10:30 pm 


Oct 1 -7 


84.7 


Man Called X 


113 


Oct 1 -7 


83.0 


Philip Marlowe 


a.4 


Dr 1. O. 


NBC 


M 10:30-11 pm 
('47-M 9:30-10) 


Sep 1-7 


9.8 




— 


Sep 1-7 


5 8 




^~ 


Burl Ives 


MBS 


F 8-8 15 pm 


Oct 15-81 


88 




— 


Oct 1-7 


88 




— 


Kraft Music Hall 


NBC 


Th 9-9:30 pm 


Oct 1-7 


18 7 




— 


Oct 1-7 


18 8 




— 


Kay Kyser 


NBC 


W 10 30-11 pm 
(■47.Sat 10-10 30) 


Oct 1-7 


10 7 




— 


Oct 1-7 


103 




~ 



26 



SPONSOR 



earlier this year, his first rated broadcast 
being September 16 with a 16 (his first 
1946 airing was on October 1). 

Kraft Music Hall is expected to do big 
things for Thursday night dialing now 
that this variety program has Al Jolson, 
this season's hottest personality on the 
air. Jolson started with an 18.8 on 
October 2. Last year during the same 
week the Music Hall had a 12.7. Jolson 
gives the Sealtest Village Store which 
follows Kraft a lift, the Jack Carson-Eve 
Arden program having received a 13.7 on 
October 2 against the 11.8 it had last 
year, when the keepers of the store were 
Jack Haley and Eve Arden. Bob Hawk 
who follows Carson-Arden did better in 
the time slot 10-10:30 p.m. than Abbott 
and Costello did last year (by only .4 of a 
point, however). Eddie Cantor started, 
October 2, with a 12 — three points lower 
than his first broadcast in 1946 during the 
same week. The Aldrich Family and 
Bums and Allen which precede Jolson 
were off from last year, the former by 1.7 
and the latter by 3.4. 

Another program which has reversed 
the downward rating trend is the RCA- 
Victor program. Although down on its 
October 5 rating due to the World Series, 
which hit every program in competition 
with it, its regular ratings are up 25 per 
cent. In spite of the warm weather it 



rated 4.6 the first week in September 
against a 3.7 in 1946. Producers gener- 
ally credit the Schwerin program psycho- 
analysis (sponsor, March 1947) as re- 
sponsible in this case. 

Other programs which ran counter to 
downward trend had new stars or made a 
network change during the year. Jack 
Berch shifted from ABC to NBC between 
1946 and 1947. His first September 
rating in 1947 was 3.3 against a 2.0 in the 
same period last year. Jimmy Durante 
shifted from CBS to NBC and started 
with a 9.7 during the first week in October 
against a 9.3 during the same period in 
1946. The '46 broadcast was the fourth 
of that season. 

Quiz Kids shifted from ABC at night, 
Sunday 7:30-8 p.m., to NBC in the after- 
noon, 4-4:30 p.m. Its rating during the 
first week in September '47 was 5.5, in '46 
5.3. Take It or Leave It shifted from CBS 
to NBC and traded in Phil Baker for 
Garry Moore. The result: 1947, 9.5, 
against a 1946 rating for the same period 
of 8.6, this despite the fact that the $64 
question quiz follows two musical pro- 
grams, Manhattan Merry'Go- Round and 
Album of Familiar Music, which are 
neither in the mood of the quiz nor high 
enough in rating to deliver an audience to 
the Eversharp program. The increased 
rating is being won also despite the fact 



that Theatre Guild which is in competition 
with it has increased its rating from a 
'46 6.2 (Oct. 6) to a 10.5 in '47 (Oct. 5). 
Sunday night listening, also because 
of the weather and other factors, is off 
generally. The sets-in-use picture indi- 
cates this without reference to the rating 
of individual programs. From 6 to 10 
p.m. the '46 '47 contrast looks like this: 



Time Period 

6:00-6:l.<> 
5:15-6:30 
6:.?0-6:45 
6:45-7:00 
7:00-7:15 
7:1.5-7:30 
7:30-7:45 
7:45-8:00 
8:00-8:15 
8:1.5-8:30 
8:30-8:45 
8:4.5-9:00 
9:00-9:15 
9:1.5-9:30 
9:,?0-9:45 
9:45-10:00 
10:00-10:15 
10:15-10:30 
** Week of October 1-7 is 



Sets in 
•46 
24.4 
23.0 
26.1 
27.6 
31.0 
30.9 
35.6 
33.8 
36.2 
39.0 
39.6 
42.1 
37.2 
32.9 
.32.8 
.33.7 
32.1 
31.2 
used for this 



Use" 

'47 

24.0 

25.2 

27.0 

26.0 

29.3 

32.8 

33.1 

33.0 

32.3 

35.9 

.34.3 

33.5 

.35.4 

31.3 

.33.2 

31.6 

28.2 

29.7 
run-df*wn. 



There are time periods, it may be 
noted, when 1946 and 1947 run neck and 
neck and a few quarter hours in which 
1947 betters 1946, but over-all listening 
is off. 

Sunday evening's less than sensational 
ratings might be traced to the fact that, 
{Please turn to page 64) 













1946 








1947 




Program 


Web 


Time 


















Ratin3 


Ratins 


Summer 


& Final 


Rating 


Rating 


Summer 


& Final 








Peiiod 


Replacement 


Rating 


Period 


Replacement 


Rating 


Life of Riley 


NBC 


Sat 8-8:?0 pm 


Sep 1-7 


9.2 







Sep 1-7 


7.9 






Lum * Abner 


ABC 
CBS 


M 8-8:15 pm 
(■47-M-F 5:45-6) 


Oct 1-7 


3.5 




— 


Oct 1-7 


2.6 (CBS) 




— 


Ted Malone 


ABC 


MWF 11:45-12 am 


Sep 1-7 


2.9 




— 


Sep 1-7 


2.8 







Tony Martin 


CBS 


Sal 7:30-8 pm 
(•47-Sun 9:30-10) 


Sep 1-7 


4.9 




— 


Sep 1-7 


6.2 




— 


Fibber McGee 


NBC 


Tu 9:30-10 pm 


Oct 1-7 


24.9 




— 


Oct 1-7 


23.0 


Fred Waring 


8.4 


Tom Mix 


MBS 


M-F 5:45-6 pm 


Sep 1-7 


2.4 




— 


Sep 1-7 


2.0 




— 


Henry Morgan 


ABC 


W 10:30-11 


Oct 1 5-21 


11.1 






Oct 1-7 


8.7 


Xavier Cugat 
(10-10:30 pm) 


2.9 


One Man's Family 


NBC 


Sun 3:30-4 pm 


Sep 1-7 


6.6 




— 


Sep 1-7 


6.3 




— 


Oizie & l-larriet 


CBS 


Sun 6-6:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


4.8 


Silver Theatre 


4.1 


Sep 1-7 


4.2 


Silver Theatre 


2.9 


Drew Pearson 


ABC 


Sun 7-7:15 pm 
(•47.Sun 6-6:15) 


Sep 1-7 


8.7 


Bill Mauldin 


3.6 


Sep 1-7 


4.5 


Leon Pearson 


4.5 


Quiz Kids 


ABC 
NBC 


Sun 7:30-8 pm 
(■47-Sun 4-4:30) 


Sep 1-7 


5.3 




^ 


Sep 1-7 


5.5 (NBC) 




— 


Prof. Quiz 


ABC 


Th 7:30-8 pm 
{■47-Sat 10-10:30) 


Sep 1-7 


3.8 






Sep 1-7 


4.3 




— 


RCA-Viclor 


NBC 


Sun 2-2:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


3.7 




— 


Sep 1-7 


4.6 




— 


Scaliest Village 


NBC 


Th 9:30-10 pm 


Sep 15-21 


10.4 




— 


Sep 15-21 


9.4 




— 


Red Skelton 


NBC 


Tu 10:30-11 pm 


Sep 15-21 


15.3 


Evening with Romberg 


7.0 


Sep 1 5-21 


17.1 


Evening with Romberg 


5.3 


Take It or Leave It 


CBS 


Sun 10-10:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


8.6 




— 


Sep 1-7 


9.5 (NBC) 




— 


Telephone Hour 


NBC 


M 9-9:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


8.0 




— 


Sep 1-7 


5.6 




— 


Truth-Consequences 


NBC 


Sat 8:30-9 pm 


Sep 1-7 


8.5 




— 


Sep 1-7 


7.8 




— 


Theatre Guild 


ABC 


Sun 10-11 pm 
(■47-Sun 9:30-10:30) 


Sep 15-21 


6.2 
6.5 


Hour of Mystery 


5.7 
6.1 


Sep 15-21 


8.7 




^~ 


Fred Waring 


NBC 


MWF 11.11:30 am 


Oct 1-7 


3.8 




— 


Oct 1-7 


3.7 nh 




— 






nh 11-11:30 am 


Oct 1-7 


3.2 




— 




3.3 F 




— 






(■47-10-10:30) 


















Those Websters 


MBS 


Sun 6-6:30 pm 


Sep 1-7 


3.4 




— 


Sep 1-7 


3.9 




— 


Waller Winchell 


ABC 


Sun 9-9:15 pm 


Sep 1-7 


12.2 


Jergens Summer Ed. 


7.0 


Sep 1-7 


10.2 


Three Views — News 


4.5 


Voice of Firestone 


NBC 


M 8:30-9 pm 


Sep 1-7 


6.8 




— 


Sep 1-7 


3.7 




— 


Vox Pop 


CBS 


Tu 9-9:30 pm 
(•47-W 8-8:30) 


Oct 1-7 


10.4 






Oct 1-7 


5.9 (ABC) 







NOVEMBER 1947 



27 




• •• one year in 



This rr|)orl deals l)ri('flv willi llu' ainaz]ii4<^ 

acceplaiice accorded one trade magazine dnring 
its first year. It presents facts. 
Frankly, it is designed to liel|) yon 
eyalnate SPONSOR'S place in yonr 

1948 trade-paper promotion. 



Colil fads: SPONSOR, in its first year, publislu'd 165 
editorial pages geared 1<M)% to sponsors, prospective 
sponsors, and llieir advertising agencies. \d\ertising 
pages totaled llT'). Knll-tiine persoruiel increased 100% 
(from 6 to 12). A Chicago branch ollice was added. 
Sales representatives >vere appointed for Los Angeles 
and San Francisco. Paid circulation (at $5 a vear) was 
achie\ed in hundreds of nationalh -important firms. 



E<ni«»riaIIv : SI*()\SOK sta\ed glued to its policy of 
designing and writing every word of editorial content 
for liiivers of broadcast advertising. U ith a single ex- 
ception, every article was staff-researched and staff- 
written. \o puff-stuff was permitted. I'he average 
issue contained more than 20 subjects, ranging from 
"'IVen-age. Sales" to the "After-midnight \udicnce." 
from "Are Timebuyers \pf»reciated" to "How Esso 
I ses News Spots." from "TV J)iar)" to "Station 
Mcprex iilati\e Study." Contests on the air. radio bv 
indu>-tr\ categories, business and persomiel changes re- 
lating to radio, Network COMPAK AGKAPII were re- 
searched and charted month after month. The em- 



phasis was on solid usable facts, on giving advertisers 
an«l agencies an appn-ciation and working knowledge 
of spot, network. TV. KM. FAX. 

i he pa \ off came in the form of reader response too 
good to believe. Hut before long station representatives 
noted the same phencjmena. Lnexpectedh. reports of 
agency -advertiser enthusiasm came to us from Lew 
Avery of Avery-knodel. Gene Katz of the Katz 
Agency. Hill Handa of )\ eed &. Comf)anv. Kd Shurick 
of Free <!( Peters. Wells Harnett of John lilair «.K Com- 
panv. Don Cooke of Donald (]ookc inc.. n()war<l 
StanlcN of Radio Sales. Said (me. "The\"re calling 
SPONSOR 'the trade pap«'r click of 1947.'" 



Unique format: Hitting the bullseye editorially was 

the big reason, we felt, for this oNcrwhelming accept- 
ance. Hut wt' w<-ren't forgetting the importance of 
our unicpie. attractive format. \\ c"d designed SPON- 
SOR to be the pictorial standout of the advertising 
trade paper field. All through our first \ear we stressed 
pictures, pictures, and more pictures. \^ e kept text- 
matter brief and meaningftd. SPONSOR. «'dited for 
busy radio buyers, was pleasant, itnportant reading. 



"Wi- lia\f found it (.SPONSOR) to con- 
lain so many down-to-earth articles 
thill I slioiild like lo secure a full set 
of l»;i«-k i^ucs (rum I lo ".*' — I.ouis K. 
WollT. kciuial! Miiiiuracturiii^ <;<>.. 
Lawrcn<c, Ma->.. * ♦ * "Hj- (J. W . 
Frazcr) would apprcrialc il il mmi 
\wiiiM <'lian^c Ills iiiailini.' addi'c>>. ><> 
llial In- >«ill r««ii\c SI'ONsOU at his 
N«->»p<irl. I{. I., siiiiiiiicr rcsi<l<>iice.'' — 
Kruiii K. Ily. S«Ti«>lary loj. W . Frazcr. 
Kaiscr-Fra/.cr (orp., W illou Kuii. 
Mich. • • • •• This ..liui I nolr is |u cy- 



press my enthusiasm for your maga- 
zine SI'ONSOU. Kudosed is .SIO for 
two fiifl sultscriplions." Joseph >A . 
Ful<:luim. The ('.oea-('ola (!o., Ne« 
> ork City • * • "It js ^nU pleasure 
ihiti we renew our suhseriplion. 
SPONSOK has heen a soinee of inler- 
eslin;: readin;: and il (ills a nuieh 
iM-eileil ^.'ap in llu- reporlinir of liroad- 
casl aelivilies." Win. II. ilainillon. 
Itadio Manay<'r. F. I. ihi I'onl d«- 
NenHiurs. W ilinin<zlon ' • ' ••|.ookiny 
<>\er llie magazines in | lio field. >» e 



decided that SPONSOK lops the li;.!. 
Plcasi- start our sul>scriplion ininie<li- 
atcly and please let us know if there 
is any way we can actiiiire back 
issues." — Mary Elizaheth <iaynor. 
Ra<lio nire«-lor. W oo<lard iV Fris Inc.. 
\lhany. N. ^ . * * * "SPONsOK is 
d<iin<: a •:oo<l joh proxidini: ad>erlisin(; 
a:;cncies like oiirsel\es wilh ideas thai 
are usefnl in the planning and pur- 
chasing; of radio spots." Richard 
Jor;;cnscn. I<ichar<l ,Jorj:«-ns«-n \«l\er- 
lisin;;. San Francis<-o ' * * ••This teller 



the life of SPOI\$OR 



W as SPONSOR merchandised? YES! Each month 
we mailed 10.000 "headline" rards nierchanchsinn; (he 
contents of the forthcoming issue. Other direct mail 
efforts amplified this effort. We refused to sell the 
front cover at a fancy figure. News and trend items 
(fast-reafhng material) were allocated to pages one and 
two just inside the front cover. This induced reader- 
ship when SPONSOR landed on a husy desk. All this 
was based on a major concept. Everv advertising 
office had its pile of trade magazines, but of these the 
average man only read two or three. Periodicallv. the 
pile was discarded. T^ e wanted to be sure that 
SPONSOR was one of the favored few. So, in addition 
to attracting readers by bright format and bullseve 
appeal, we merchandised our pages. 



Vt'hat about circulation? SPONSOR'S monthlv 
guaranteed circulation was 8.000. During the \ear 
three out of every four copies went to national sponsors 
and to national and regional advertising agencies. 
Some sponsor and agency firms purchased as manv as 
five to ten separate subscriptions ($5 a year). Much of 
sponsor's circulation is still on a controlled basis, but 
the conversion to paid subscribers proceeds faster than 
expected. The latest breakdown showed: 



Paid-Subscriber Position Analvs 



national sponsors and prospective 


3362 


41.0% 


sponsors 






timebuvers, account executives, radio 


2487 


30.5 


directors 






radio station executives 


1621 


20.0 


miscellaneous 


654 


8.5 



9.0% 
8.0 



Siponsor /Inns 
{)rcsi(lenls 
vice presidents 
advertising man- 72.0 
agers, radio 
(Urectors 
others 11.0 

100.0% 



Advertising agencies 



{)resi(lenls 

\ict' presidents and 

account mi'u 

(imcbuycrs. media 

men, radio directors 

others 



17.5% 
27.0 




100.0% 



8124 100.0% 



Surveys: Onl\ three stuilies made l)\ impartial organi- 
zations came to our attention during the \ear. In each 
SPONSOR showed progressively better. KMIJC made 
the first in December 1946 when SPONSOR was one 
issue old. SPONSOR was fourth out of eight radio 
publications. In January 1947, when SPONSOR was 
two issues old. Free tK Peters completed a study. 
SPONSOR polled 1198 points, the top radio puhlication 
3531. WJ^ made a king-size .surve\ in March 19 f 7 
when SPONSOR was five issues old. Of nine advertis- 
ing trade magazines SPONSOR was second. Nearly 
2000 agencv and sponsor executives participated. We're 
13 issues old now and anxious to see the fourth survey. 



A WORD ABOUT RATES: Rale Card No. 2, which incrzaszs rales r)ow in force 
about 16%, becomes effeclive January 1948. But Ralz Card No. 1, currently in 
effect, will continue lo be valid (or the full one-year duration of all contracts placed 
prior to 1 January 1 948. If you don't have Rate Cards Nos. 1 and ! please as!< for them. 



is to ask that you transfer my sub- 
scription to my home, where I find 
more time for reading." — Milton 
Goodman, Executive Vice President, 
Lawrence Gumbinner -Vdvertising 
Agency Inc., New York (aty * * * "Your 
magazine is read in this agency by 
our management, our account men, 
writers, and of course, by our Radio 
Department. Our only objection to 
your fine magazine is that it's such a 
long time between issues." — James B. 
Hill, Director of Radio, Brooke, 



Smith, French & Dorrance Inc., 
Detroit * * * "Your magazine ad- 
dressed to our Mr. G. M. Walker, 
-Advertising Manager, is routed to 
many different members of our com- 
pany. This magazine is widely read 
and appreciated." — M. .4nn Huston. 
Caterpillar Tractor Co., Peoria, III. 
* * * "I can't resist any longer. En- 
closed is my check for one year's 
subscription. Please send copies to 
my home." — Fred M. Stoutland, 
BBD&O, New York. 




For Buyers of Broadcast Advertising 




®This was due to be a transcrip- 
tion year* (sponsor, June 
1947). Through programs well 
recorded, with star names of network 
calibre, spot radio was scheduled to climb 
heights not even the most sanguine sta- 
tion owner had dared hope. Then on 
Saturday, October 18, James C. Pctrillo 
announced, on behalf of the American 
Federation of Musicians, that members 
of the Federation would cease making re- 
cordings on December 31, 1947. 

The first reaction to the statement 
among transcription organizations was 
consternation. This was especially true 
of producers of open-end musical tran- 
scriptions. When the first heat had 




It's 9oin3 to be tough on Tommy Dorsey 

cooled off, even the biggest producers of 
open-end broadcast recordings knew that 
in the case of some producers it meant the 
greatest intensive recording schedule ever 



attempted. It meant doing two years of 
recordings in two months. 

However, in the offices of most syndi- 
cated transcription organizations there 
was little worry. For the most part tran- 
scriptions, like network cooperative pro- 
grams, are recorded without music. Mys- 
tery series do not require musical 
interludes nor do the average dramatic or 
comedy transcriptions. Programs like 
Ronald Colman's Favorite Story, however, 
depend a great deal on the mood scoring 
of their music but Favorite Story, for one, 
wont be minus that feature at least for a 
long time to come. Ziv is many months 
ahead of release schedule and will no 
doubt make further plans for music for 
many months of future releases. This 
wouldn't be possible without Ziv's re- 
sources. 

There are others who are doing what 
Ziv will do; at least all of the producers 
who are in active production will record 
masters to protect themselves for a mini- 
mum of 12 months ahead. Guy Lom- 
bardo, according to report, is recording 
eight hours a day six days a week to 
complete his 156 program contract with 
Ziv. The ban does place a halter 
around the neck of Lou Cowan's organi- 
zation in so far as his Tommy Dorsey disk 
jockey series is concerned, for the popu- 
larity of a name disk jockey is tied up 
with his ability to anticipate musical hits. 
When there are no disks being currently 
recorded it's very difficult to anticipate 
what will be popular because popularity 
will depend upon what the music pub- 
lishers and the recording organizations 
get behind. Popularity is always syn- 
thetic during any music ban. It becomes 
a big business drive, not a spontaneous 
yen on the part of the public. Not even 



Tommy Dorsey can read the minds of 
music publishers and the artist and reper- 
toire heads of recording companies. If 
anyone could, T. D. would be the man. 

The fact is that except for the tran- 
scribed musical libraries like NBC Thes- 
aurus, World, and Standard, to mention 
three, the use of e.t.'s will continue to 
expand with or without the AFM ban. 
It is being proved every day by the net- 
works, through their cooperative pro- 
gram departments, that programs with- 
out music can do a top local selling 
job, and gather top audiences. It would 
therefore seem that the programs of the 
top transcription producers (except for 
purely musical programs) do not require 
music either. Co-ops have no dramatic 
star on the air to equal transcription's 
Ronald Colman or the stars of The Smiths 
oj Hollywood. Dick Kollmar (Boston 
Blackie), George Raft {Mr. Ace), and 
Eddie Bracken can be helF)ed by music 
but not made by it. 

The big development in the syndicated 
transcription field, apart from the hurdle 
erected by James C. Petrillo, has been the 
entry of customizing of recordings by 
many of the releasing organizations. 
National spot advertisers have always 
questioned just how well their commer- 
cials were being handled locally with 
their sponsorship of a fine transcribed 
presentation. When they could afford 
built-to-order transcriptions they got just 
the right kind of commercial punch they 
were seeking. This is no reflection on the 
abilities of local announcers. Advertisers 
recognize that many of the networks' best 
air salesmen came up through the ranks 
at smaller stations. On the other hand 

*Hadio yrar rum from Srplrmber //ir, pi<i« lujii.*/ 



30 



SPONSOR 



They'll iaush with a tuneless Eddie Bracken 



no dead duck 

despite latest AFM edict 



they also know that even Ben Grauer can 
miss the point if someone isn't around to 




George Raft's "Mr. Ace" requires no^music 

tip him off about just what the advertiser 
is trying to accomplish — and that can't 
readily be accomplished by remote 
control. 

Syndicated transcriptions have there- 
fore remained question marks in the 
minds of many key advertisers. That 
attitude should shortly be a thing of the 
past. Sponsors all over the U. S. and 
Canada are becoming aware of the fact 
that it's possible to have their commer- 
cials recorded, often by members of the 
casts doing the syndicated programs they 
buy. Most of the same organizations 
from advertisers purchase syndi- 
cated shows will record the advertiser's 
commercials for him, timed to the split 
second to fit into the timing and mood of 
the transcribed programs. Transcription 



Sales, Inc., were pioneers in opening 
sponsors' and agencies' doors to the use of 
customizing. When they sell Singin' Sam, 
they often sell commercials by the 
Mullen Sisters (they're in the Singin' Sam 
series) with the order. Sixteen of these 
one-minute recorded announcements cost 
the local sponsor $300, for which he gets 
the disking and two processed copies of 
the transcriptions. For the same type of 
special deal on TSI's other programs, 
Wings of Song, Captain Stubby and the 
Buccayxeers, Westward Ho!, Your Hymn for 
the Day, or Immortal Love Songs, the cost 
is just $200. These costs jump consider- 
ably if the advertiser wants Colman or a 
star of like calibre to do his selling. But 
that top names aren't really needed is 
pointed out by one agency man who 
bought a number of markets for a syndi- 
cated e.t. series and had an unnamed 
commercial announcer in Hollywood re- 
cord the commercials in the exact mood 
of the programs. 

Some agencies shy at doing special re- 
corded commercials for one-city buys of a 
syndicated transcription, but as an adver- 
tising agency executive down in Atlanta 
pointed out, it's cheap insurance if the 
disk is being placed in any market where 
the time costs exceed $50 for the program. 
The radio director of the agency pointed 
out that by rotating 16 one-minute com- 
mercials it is possible to cover at least a 
13-week series. If time were to cost $50 
and the e.t. rights for the area half of that, 
$25, 13 weeks would cost the advertiser 
$975. Two hundred dollars for the com- 
mercials would be 20 per cent, which is 
not much for such insurance. He also 
pointed out that the same 16 commercial 
announcements could be used much 
longer than 13 'weeks since on''the basis 



Guy Lombardo is recordingfday and night 



of two commercials per program only 10 
of the 16 would be heard twice during a 
13-week span. Even networks use com- 
mercial appeals more often than that. 

Custom-built transcribed commercials 
combined with syndicated recorded pro- 
grams give national spot advertisers the 
combination that they're seeking. There 
area few transcription organizations which 
aren't too happy to undertake customized 
commercializing but even they will do the 
job if the agency or advertiser requests it. 

Hit hardest by the transcription ban 
will be the stars like Bing Crosby and 
singers like Burl Ives and Morton 
Downey. They were supposed to repre- 
sent the vanguard of big names who were 
going to insist on putting their shows on 
platters in order to get away from having 
to go to the studios for every broadcast. 
Bing can still record his part of his pro- 
gram as long as the musicians on the 
program are live when the program goes 

{Please turn to page 61) 




f 



t.. 



Do children develop adult 
habits of iisrening? 

What is the relative impact of across- 
the-board juvenile programing? 

What is the value of a juvenile half- 
hour program as against the same vehicle 
in quarter-hour form? 

Master-minding of answers to these and 
like questions has been an advertising 
agency pastime. Until General Mills and 
Derby Foods decided to sp»onsor Jack 
Armstrong and Sky King in half-hour 
form after both programs had been on the 
air for an extended period as 15-minute 
daytime strips, there never had been a 
conclusive test. 

The half-hour test started this fall with 
initial ratings in the Hcwpcr report cover- 



32 



ing the week of October 1-7. Jack Ann' 
strong, broadcasting Tuesday, Wednes- 
day, and Friday during the week covered, 
received a rating of 2.3. As a 15-minute 
across-the-board program during the same 
week last year it rated 2.6 with the sets in 
use virtually the same. They compared 
this way 

1946 1947 

Sits in Ise 15.9 15.8 

so this year's and last year's ratings are 
comparable. 

Sky King was not yet on the air during 
the first week in October last year so no 
comparison can be made for it at this 
time. However, its first rating as a 
children's hour strip was 2.5 and its first 
half-hour rating, this year, was also 2.5 



(for a Monday and Thursday schedule). 
It remains for time to tell the story in 
this case. 

The children's hour is one of radio's 
oldest broadcasting traditions. From 5 
to 6 p.m. broadcasting sfations the nation 
over have for years had their Uncle 
WIPs (WIP, Philadelphia). Uncle Dons 
(WOR, New York\ Uncle Mickeys 
(WIS, Columbia, S. C), Uncle Walts 
(WAYS, Charlotte), and a host of other 
wee-kiddie airings from the Singing Lady 
to Auntie Alice. The programs in this 
category that remain on the air have in 
most cases ceased to pull the wa>' the\' 
did years ago. Many of them talked 
down to the four-to-seven-year-olds so 
(PlecLse turn to page 60'^ 

SPONSOR 



:;:^ ^R t : ; ^3 uS 




The show: 

WRVA's "Quiz of Two Cities." 

This exciting brain battle matches 

teams from Virginia's two biggest 

cities — Richmond and Norfolk. Sometimes Richmond wins. Other times, 

Norfolk. But every Saturday night from 7:00 to 7:30, the sponsor wins 

the biggest prize of all ... a Hooperating of 11.5* ... a billion-dollar 

market with 395,780 radio families!** 

For more information on how to win this big prize, get in touch with 
us or Radio Sales. And ask about WRVA's "Quiz of Two Cities." 



WRVA 

RICHMOND and NORFOLK, VA. 
Represented by Radio Sales. 



*Hooper Report (Winter 1946~Spring 1947) 
** WRVA's 50-100% BMB Nighttime Audience Area 



NOVEMBER 1947 



33 



Repeat 
Uroadcasts 
in 1947 



IVB€ aiiiil IVlrillo 

€li»n*f like tlic^ni reeorded, 

liiii Klar!< flo 



^^BRj 



''. Numerically, repeat shows* 
are almost the same as they 
were at the start of last sea- 
son (81 programs at the start of the 1946 
season, 83 in 1947). This is as far as the 
repeat story repeats itself. In practically 
all other respects duplicate broadcasts for 
different sections of the nation are 
planned in 1947 on a basis quite different 
from that which governed previous opera- 
tions. And after the first of the year the 
repeat picture will suffer another up- 
heaval due to the latest edict of James C. 
Petrillo, President of the American Feder- 
ation of Musicians. This edict bans all 
recording by musicians "now and for- 
ever." 

Recordings are the backbone of repeat 
broadcasting on both the Mutual Broad- 
casting System and the American Broad- 
casting Company networks. This year 
for the first time the Columbia Broadcast- 
ing System also is permitting West Coast 
repeats on transcriptions, due to talent 
pressure. Talent in many cases feels that 



a live repeat program lacks the spon- 
taneity of the original broadcast. Es- 
pecially does this feeling hold in the case 
of comedy productions. Quiz and other 
audience participation programs also 
suffer, in the minds of the performers, 
from repeat presentations. Everybody 
involved admits of course that most adult 
nighttime airings must be broadcast later 
on the Coast than they are in the East if 
they are to reach the listeners for whom 
they are designed — and to whom the 
sponsor is addressing his sales message. 
Nevertheless, Ralph Edwards of Truth or 
Consequences refused this year to produce 
the rough-house shindig twice in one 
night. NBC on its part refused to permit 
a recorded repeat. The senior network 
holds fast to the belief that to permit 
transcriptions on the network would be 
to open the door to "canned" web enter- 
tainment, losing the feeling of immediacy, 
the feeling that the listener is hearing his 
entertainment just as it is originated. 
Truth or Consequences is not being 



broadcast twice each Saturday night 
despite the NBC ukase against recorded 
repeats. It's handled as a "d.b.," a de- 
layed broadcast. D.b.'s are broadcasts 
which are recorded off the network line 
and repeated later in the afternoon or 
evening from each station's own transcrip- 
tion of the program. Thus NBC's rule of 
no recorded network programs still stands 
and Ralph Edwards still does not have to 
knock himself out doing his nerve-racking 
routine twice in one night. 

Delayed broadcasts are part and parcel 
of all network broadcasting in station 
option time.** In this time period, which 
by FCC regulation belongs exclusively to 
the station, network sponsors often have 
to accept a delayed broadcast of their 
programs if they want airings in key 
markets. On key-market stations local 
advertisers frequently build programs 
with big followings and both the station 
and the local spxansor are loath to give 
way for a network airing. When the de- 
layed broadcast is to be made is not, 
however, left to the station's whim. 
Availabilities are submitted to the adver- 
tising agencies and the best availability 
for the particular program is selected by 
the timebuyer. It is estimated that dur- 
ing the daylight saving time period there 
were some 2000 d.b.'s per week on NBC 
and CBS alone due to the fact that many 
areas retained standard time while the 
networks had to operate for the greatest 
number of listeners and were on daylight 
time. 

All through the summer both MBS and 
ABC operated on the basis of recorded 
repeats for each time zone. Thus they 
were able to air their programs at the 
same time in every zone. ABC pushed 
most strongly for this device of handling 
the tremendous problem which dual time 
placed upon the networks. As a matter 
of record, ABC executives endeavored to 
have all networks function on this basis of 
recorded repeats, which would, thought 
the ABC execs, end the problem of a 
sponsor's buying a key time in New York 
only to find his program being heard in the 
Mountain and Pacific time zones by audi- 
ences he's not interested in reaching, due 
to the hour of broadcast. 

Regional live and recorded repeats both 
cost the sponsor the same percentage of 
the scale which the performers are paid 
for the original broadcast (this for actors 
and singers is 45 per cent of the fee of the 
first broadcast). The stars of course are 
covered by their over-all contract and 
generally do not receive additional pay- 
ment because of dual broadcasts. 

Sponsor's survey of the rating effec- 
tiveness of repeat programs (January 



34 



SPONSOR 



1947) iiuiiaited tliat llic top and botloin 
rated programs do not profit much from 
repeats but that the shows which crowded 
neither the top nor the bottom found 
repeats resulttlil. 

On Don Lee-Mutual network programs 
are frequently recorded and aired at a 
time when because of special block pro- 
graming the program has a bigger audi' 
ence than it could have had in its original 
broadcast period. Mutual 's Pacific Coast 
ratings are usually better than they are 
for the rest of the nation because of this 
Don Lee plan which reschedules MBS 
shows in block-program sequences. 

Delayed broadcasts such as Don Lee's 
and all the other networks' during station 



repeats as of January 1 take on an en- 
tirely new aspect. On that date tran- 
scribed repeats as well as all transcrip- 
tions which include music (and most 
shows, dramatic, variety, or comedy, in- 
clude music) are forbidden. The prob- 
lem once again returns to a clearing of all 
repeat or delayed programs on a live basis 
(see transcription report on page 30). 
This, as noted previously, will not affect 
NBC to any great degree except in the 
delayed broadcast category. The effect 
on CBS will not be great since the relaxa- 
tion of the no-records-on-the-air rule is 
very recent at Columbia and not too 
many CBS programs do a West Coast 
transcribed repeat. 



8:30 in the mountain areas and 7:M) on 
the Pacific Coast. Since it's well known 
that West Coast folks are home earlier 
than their opposite numbers in the Ea.st, 
a lot of programs have been happy with 
this schedule. 

Worriers like Jack Benny, however, 
have sweated it out for years, airing pro- 
grams at four in the afternoon in Holly- 
wood to reach New York at 7 p.m. 
Benny worried so much that he per- 
suaded Foote, Cone and Belding, Ameri- 
can Tobacco advertising agency, to repeat 
his program at night on the Don Lee net- 
work. It helps his rating. It's a recorded 
repeat and will have to go with the rest of 
the transcriptions under the Petrillo edict. 




Audiences for live repeat programs turn out en masse. Directors and casts, however, aver that they're a different breed from the regular fans 



option time load a tremendous burden on 
agency executives who have to clear and 
okay the delayed time schedules. This is 
because while it's a comparatively simple 
matter to check competition for a net- 
work program coast-to-coast, it's entirely 
different to check it in 20 to 50 marketsf 
at different times. Actually this means 
checking competition for every station 
doing a d.b. of a program. It means that 
the timebuyer of an agency instead of 
having to clear just one time period for a 
network program finds himself faced with 
a problem which is equivalent to clearing 
both network and spots. It also means 
constant supervision of each of the areas 
in which there is a delayed broadcast 
because naturally the competition is 
changing in every one of these spots 
frequently. 
However, all these problems of recorded 



For ABC the no-transcription rule of 
Petrillo will hit a number of programs on 
which there is music. In the case of the 
ABC skein of kid shows, music is not an 
important factor and its current use if 
any may be eliminated. The same will 
be true of the Mutual group of moppet 
programs. As a matter of record the 
formula that the networks have followed 
with their cooperative programs (shows 
originated by the networks but sponsored 
over one or more stations by local adver- 
tisers) can be used on all productions that 
require recorded repeats ... no music. 

The reason why many sponsors risk 
having part of their potential audiences 
go to sleep on them by broadcasting at 
10 p.m. or 10:30 p.m. is that at that hour 
they reach a good part of the country with 
a single coast-to-coast airing. Ten-thirty 
in New York is 9:30 in the middlewest, 



Sponsors and agencies feel that an ideal 
broadcast arrangement would be one 
through which their programs would be 
heard at the same time in every time 
zone. This is not feasible on a live pro- 
gram basis but is, through recorded 
regional repeats. There has been a great 
deal of agitation in this direction but 
that's a matter of the past. Big time 
productions require music and tran- 
scribed repeats with music can only con- 
tinue if Petrillo changes his mind. 

His "now and forever" dictum doesn't 
indicate a chameleon frame of mind — 
forever is a long, long time. 

*\etwork prtHjrnnis which are rebrondctisi so thai they 

lire heard at approrimately the same hmtr in every 

time Kme. 

**Time on the air for network stations is divided into 

network option and station option perittds. Dnrittt] the 

firmer tfw netu^nrk tuts first call on the station's time. 

I)ttrin*t the latter the station airs a network pro^/ram at 

its OH7I option. 

^Delayed liroadcasts frequently run between ?W and 51) 

per indiridual pnnjrani network airing. 



NOVEMBER 1947 



35 




Eastman Kodak has developed a new 
camera for photographing a program off 
the face of a video receiving tube. NBC 
and CBS are said to have orders for the 
first eight cameras. The cameras will all 
be in the hands of purchasers within the 
next month. Some have been delivered 
already. (It's one of those top secrets 
that isn't talked about in photographic 
and TV circles.) 

Photographing sound and film pro- 
grams for rescanning on other stations 
throughout the U. S. and Canada is going 
a long way toward solving the problem of 
program material for small TV stations. 
The cost of photographing a program in 
the studio is conservatively figured as 
being lOO-fold* that of filming it off the 
face of a receiving tube. 

Just as radio is the world's greatest 
consumer of oral entertainment material 
so will TV eat up more visual entertain- 
ment in one month than was ever con- 
ceived in the past, even at the height of 

vaudeville. 

* * * 

The expected shift towards placing the 
burden of producing commercial TV pro- 



grams on advertising agencies is under 
way. Despite considerable feeling at the 
networks that production would be better 
if program creation and execution re- 
mained with the chains, radio thinking is 
forcing the hands of the nets' television 
heads and more and more the prrxducer's 
chair will be occupied by agency men. 

There is another factor that is bringing 
this about manpower. It would be 
manifestly impossible for any network to 
staff an operation which would keep it on 
the air with live programs from 6 to 1 1 
p.m. seven days a week. Dramatic pro- 
ducers at networks feel that no one person 
can produce a new drama or other creative 
type of visual program weekly. Never- 
theless Kraft, for instance, expected its 
agency to have a man do just that. The 
only result of a schedule of a program per 
week per prcxiucer, according to a number 
of trained television directors, will be 
formula productions without real creative 
spirit. It takes months to produce a 
motion picture and four weeks to produce 
a Broadway play. TV has to compete 
with both Broadway and Hollywood and 
that can't be done successfully with 
shows that can have only days instead of 

weeks or months for production. 

* * * 

The Allied Stores Television Caravan 
finished its 22-department-store trek in 
the black, the first video venture to do 
this according to bossman Sam Cuff. 
Lou Sposa acted as traveling ring master 
for the six-jeep TV department store 



circus. The presentation proved among 
other things how reliable present-day 
equipment is. The cameras and control 
board employed were the same used at the 
New York World's Fair and there wasn't 
a single failure at any place along the line. 
The Allied tour indicated, according to 
Walt Dennis, who heads up radio and TV 
for the Allied chain, that television is one 
thing that dtK'sn't have to be sold to the 
public. Says Dennis, "Our tour proved 
that the great majority of the public only 
wants to know 'When can I buy a set?' 
and 'When will my local television station 
be working?' " 

Walt Dennis didn't mention it, but it is 
true also that the manufacturers whose 
products were displayed as part of the 
intra-store TV presentation were "more 
than satisfied by the direct results" ob- 
tained from their sponsorship. 
* * * 

CBS is developing plans which will put 
it in the TV network business as soon as 
possible. It expects to have in its pre- 
liminary chain stations like WMAL-TV 
and other affiliated stations of the Ameri- 
can Broadcasting Company and may even 
service MBS outlets. The reason for this 
is simple — with many of the pioneer tele- 
casters linked to NBC and the total 
number of stations applied for at this 
time limited, no network can wait until 
enough of its affiliates put TV stations on 
the air to start building a chain. 
(Please turn to page 75) 




Ten per cent of the nation's FM sta- 
tions on the air employ live musicians, the 
number employed being 121. There is no 
prohibition against live musical programs 
on FM stations, the only non-musical 



rule is the serving of FM stations with 
music by AM stations or networks, either 
AM (Standard) or FM. As indicated in 
previous reports in this section James C. 
Petrillo's reasoning is simple. He wants 
all stations to have live orchestras, even 
if the orchestra, at the start, is just a 
pianist. If any network should agree to 
restrict its piping of music to FM stations 
having contracts with locals of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Musicians there is little 
doubt but that this would be agreeable to 
the musicians' president. * * * Only 8 per 
cent of the nation's FM stations are oper- 



ating at a profit. Six per cent are break- 
ing even. The balance, 86 per cent, are 
losing money every day. This despite the 
fact that 25 per cent of the FM'ers have 
increased their gross billing in the past 
six months. * * * Just as with TV, sports 
on FM are reaching the greatest audience 
in the areas where the sportcasts feature 
exclusive games not heard over AM sta- 
tions. Sports lead all program types in 
obtaining quick sponsorship. Listeners- 
per-set for these airings are more than 
twice what the same games collected on 
standard broadcasting stations. 




Publicity on ultrafax, RCA's facsimile, 
has forced all other factors in the field to 
speed up research on electronic reproduc- 



tion of FAX reception. Most devices 
thus far presented have used manual 
rather than photographic means of re- 
producing the received material. Big 
problem is not the actual reproduction 
but the creating of equipment which can 
go into the home and be serviced by the 
local radio repair man. The present 
Finch, Hogan and other F.AX reproducers 
are well within the ken of the neighbor- 



hood fixer. It's said, however, that the 
ultrafax, which receives pages of type or 
pictures, operates at such a tremendous 
speed that it requires an expert to take 
care of it. * * * Eastman Kodak demon- 
strated a camera during the week of 
October 19 that took pictures at the rate 
of 11,000,000 a second. While ultrafax 
isn't that fast it indicates the direction 
that photography is going. 



36 



SPONSOR 



ST. LOUIS NUMBER OXE 
TEST MARKET FOR 

TELEVISION 

St. Louis^ geographical location in 
the center of the rich middle -west^ 
and St. Louis^ aclcnowledged repu- 
tation for economic stability^ high 
purchasing po^ver and product -loy- 
alty make the area served by KSD-T V 
the nation's DUMBER ONE TEST 
MARKET FOR SELLING BY 
TELEVISION. 

The combination of St. Louis' enthu- 
siasm for television^ KSD-TVs accu- 
mulated iaiow-how9 and KSD-TVs 
exceptionally low rates offer an out- 
standing opportunity for advertis- 
ers to start using television effec- 
tively RIGHT NOW. 

For details regarding schedules and 
availabilities^ write or call Free & 
Peters^ Inc. or KSD-TV^ the St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch Television Station^ 
1111 Olive Streets St. Louis I9 jIIo. 

NOVEMBER 1947 37 




EMILE COTE'S THRILLING CHORAL SERIES 

The best from Tin Pan Alley, Hollywood 
and the Classics by the Superb 
Sixteen- Voiced SERENADERS 



Now \(Mi <-aii >|>oii><>r lli«- sin<;in<: •rroiip uilli 
ihi' lon<:«-st ronliiiiMUis r<M-c»r(i (tii iIk' air of 
ntiy \ocal or^aiiizalioii . . . almost 600 broad- 
casts ox'r ('HS. Kv<"r\ iiu'iiiImt is a star in his 
own rijilil willi a l>ark^roiiii«i of lop-show 
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S«'\«'nl\-«'ifrlil s«'|>aral«' fii lc«-ii-iniiiiil(' rpisculrs 
are availal>l<-. 4'a«-h a program ;z<'iii (lircrU**! h} 



Kmili- C.oli' aii<l >silli \\ arr<'ii SweeiU'v of New 
> ork I'liilhariiioiiic faiiu- actiii;: as i-oninien- 
lalor an<l iiiiisi<-al host. Opening, inside, and 
closinji ronmiercials. 

No finer musical lalcnl of il- i\\n- exists today. 
WI\(;S OK SO\(; i> a pro^'rani scries with 
IrcinciKJous p4»piilar a|>p«-al. made possihl«> h\ 
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TRANSCRIPTION SALES, ISI 



New York— 47 West 56th St.. New York 22. N. Y.. Col. 5-1-544 



r.Y.. Col. 5-1-544 Chicag aj 

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An outstanding High-Hooper Show with 
the famous MULLEN SISTERS and 
CHARLIE MAGN ANTE'S Orchestra 



There is only one Singin' Sam and what a selling job 
he has clone for scores of sponsors . . . and can do for 
you. Singin' Sam sells because he gets the ratings and 
gets the response. 

WOW Omaha l».l al 6:30 P.M. 

WTAM Cleveland I2.i al 6:00 P.M. 

CKEY Toronto 12.9 at 7:30 P.M. 

CJAD Montreal 11.8 at 7:30 P.M. 

Ami according to ihc (Ionian survey, the percentage of 
tune-in at WISH in Indianapolis was doubled in first 
three months on the air . . • 14.6 to 30.4. 

Yes, Sam is doing a spectacular job. His fifteen minute 
shows have been heard on over 200 stations for scores of 
sponsors. 

Write for audition disc and full details on special com- 
mercials bv Sam, availabilities, etc. 



AMERICA'S 

GREATEST RADIO 

SALESMAN 




117 W. High St., Springfield, Ohio 
Telephone 2-4974 

2 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111.. Superior 3053 
.5600 



i 



I 



Transcription Sales, Inc. 
117 West High Street 
Springfield, Ohio 

Please send me complete data on 
D Singin' Sani 
D Wings of Song 

Name 

Compaiix 

Street 

City State 



I 



I 





Mr. iSpflflsor Asks... 



"Ilou iiiiK-li |)r<>l<'<'ti<>ii sIkmiUI stations and ii<'t\vorks 
:j[iv<' a(l\<'rtis('r8 in li4»l(liii<r onto a tiiiir slot for >^ lii<'li 
that aWxTlisor lias hnilt a liijili listrninji f"a<'lor?" 



>eymour 



Ellis 



National Advertising Manager 
Philip Morris & Co., Ltd, New York 




nil*. i:iliM 



In my opinion, 
the answer to the 
above question 
would depend 
somewhat on the 
station's program- 
ing policy. 

The broadcaster 
endeavors to 
build a balanced 
program structure 
that will meet the needs and desires of 
listeners. Maintaining such a structure 
throughout the day and week is of first 
importance and it could conflict with the 
plans and wishes of less than year-round 
advertisers. In such an event, an adver- 
tiser who cooperates in maintaining or 
contributing to such a program pattern 
should, and I believe does, receive pro- 
tection far beyond the written terms of 
any advertising contract. 

In our own case, for example, we have 
one dail\ program supplied by an adver- 
tiser which exactly fits our program plan- 
ning for the particular time of day. The 
advertiser is not a year-round user of 
time, but because the program does fit 
into our planning, we carry it sustaining 
during the period it is not sponsored and 
hold the time each year for that adver- 
tiser. In other cases, we have programs 
of our own creation, which will remain as 
they are, regardless of any commercial 
sponsorship. 

Most of these programs are now spon- 
sored. Some o( them have been spon- 
sored by the same advertiser for many 
year>;. If one of these long-time adver- 



tisers, for some good cause, desired a 
hiatus, we would in all probability hold 
the time and the program for him by 
prior arrangement until he was ready to 
resume. In another case, where the 
sponsor had been with us a shorter time 
and we would not feel the same obliga- 
tion, it is possible we would give him a 
lesser protection. 

Summarized, 1 feel that each case is 
decided on its individual characteristics. 
A mutual interest on the part of the 
advertiser and consideration of your pro- 
gram problems will usually result in a 
solution satisfactory to both broadcaster 
and client. 

Glenn Snyder 
General Manager 
WLS 



There is no 
question in my 
mind that an ad- 
vertiser should 
have absolute pro- 
tection on any 
time segment he 
holds, network or 
station, subject, of 
course, to the 
terms of the orig- 
inal sale. It should be his, to have and to 
hold henceforth, so long as he supplies a 
program for that time which meets the 
accepted standards of decency and good 
taste. There is, of course, the remote 
possibility that an advertiser might use 
such a time franchise to put on a program 
to suit his own personal whim, and by so 
doing might damage the continuity of 
listening which every station and net- 
work hopes to achieve and maintain, but 
since the question specifically mentions a 
big listening audience, that eventuality 
appears to be ruled out. Radio advertis- 
ing has become such an integral part of 
the business of those advertisers using it 





that a concept that franchises might be 
arbitrarily transferred to someone else 
would shake the whole structure of the 
industry. Absolute protection is es- 
sential. 

Storrs Haynes 

Manager, Radio Department 

Coynpton Advertising, Inc. 

Actually, there 
are two full prob- 
lems there. In the 
case of stations 
which are network 
affiliates, a local 
sponsor's time 
slot should be his, 
unless he is adver- 
tising in network 
option time. In 

the latter case, advertisers are fully aware 
of the 28-day recapture clause ... or 
should be. It would hardly be fair to a 
national advertiser or the network if such 
time could not be cleared for a network 
show. 

As far as network radio is concerned, I 
think it should be up to the individual 
advertiser to decide when he will vacate a 
time slot. A sponsor who has built a big 
listening audience for a time period has 
an investment in that time period when 
it comes to promotion, publicity, mer- 
chandising, etc. This investment should, 
by all means, be protected. 

Such protection depends to some extent 
on the length of the program. Contracts 
for five- or fifteen-minute shows are gener- 
ally written with recapture clauses, but a 
network sponsor who buys upwards of 
fifteen minutes should certainly have his 
time slot as long as his program remains 
fully acceptable. 

And incidentally, I don't believe pro- 
grams should be moved arbitraril\' be- 
cause of the general type of entertainment 
they provide, if a network or station 
has decided on a i-H)lic>' whereby they 



40 



SPONSOR 




won't take certain types of shows during 
certain hours, the sponsor should still be 
permitted to hold on to his time slot until 
he decides to relinquish it. 

Just to sum up, I feel that in the matter 
of holding a time slot, unless there are 
contract clauses or obvious violations, the 
advertiser should have the final say. 
Ed Wilhelm 
Radio Director 
Maxon, New York 



It is important 
to recognize that 
radio is an adver- 
tising medium and 
also a public serv- 
ice. It is my be- 
, » - M ''^^ ^^^^ adver- 

^B " Jm risers who have 

H| ' built high listen' 

PBI ^ ing audiences or 

unusual public 
service programs in specific time slots 
have created valuable properties, and 
should be afforded more than usual pro- 
tection by stations and networks. 

In the case of an outstanding public 
service program, 1 would go so far as to 
suggest that networks and stations eX' 
tend more than usual cooperation in 
granting options and clearing time for 
such a program (even though they may 
not already be carrying that program) 
whenever a change is called for to afford 
greater audience potential through better 
program sequencing. 

While I do not feel that networks or 
stations should ride roughshod over an 
advertiser's right to a time period through 
consecutive use of such period, I do feel 
that networks and stations have an obli- 
gation to the public in the interest in 
maintaining of both spot and network 
radio to its highest degree of efficiency in 
getting audiences and also in rendering 
service in the public interest. It is 
equally important to all advertisers that 
our system of broadcasting be maintained 
on its present basis cf free enterprise and 
that it not degenerate to a point where 
those who would rather see a Govern- 
ment-controlled noncommercial opeia- 
tion of radio succeed in supplanting our 
present system. 

Much improvement can be made in 
station and network programing by care- 
ful selection of programs in relation to 
surrounding programs. Any advertiser 
who has already created a valuable prop- 
erty with high listening audience in a 
specific slot most certainly should be 

{Please turn to page 55) 



WFBM is 

C<^K^^<UMilcf HOOPERATED TOPS 

Count on consistency with WFBM. 
'Round-the-clock — the year around 
— WFBM delivers the lion's share of 
the listening audience. WFBM is 
consistently Hooperated tops! 

WFBM is 

(^OKdC^tCHtCcf FIRST in Indianapolis 

Ten in a row! Yes — the Hooper 
Station Listening Index for each of 
ten consecutive months rates WFBM 
first in Indianapolis in over-all lis- 
tening audience. And — the last five 
consecutive reports show WFBM 
leading the next-highest-rated In- 
dianapolis station by 20% or more! 
WFBM is consistently Hooperated 
tops! 

WFBM is 

(^M^Utc^tticf. TOP TEN (CBS) Nationally 

WFBM's record nationally is not 
to be sneezed at either. WFBM's 
Hooper index — morning, afternoon, 
and evening— is consistently rating 
among the top ten CBS stations 
throughout the country! WFBM is 
consistently Hooperated tops! 



WFBM 

INDIANAPOLIS 



BASIC AFFILIATE: Columbia Broadcasting System 
Represented Nationally by The Katz Agency 



NOVEMBER 1947 



41 



SPONSOR presents (he third, next to Rnal, report of a series of indices of locally- 
produced programs available for sponsorship throughout the U. S. This issue lists 
representative drama, juvenile, music, man-on-the-$treet, news, quiz, sports, variety, 
and women s participating. These indices make available for the first time a yard- 
stick on costs of local programs since stations of all sizes are indexed. Pacific 
and Canadian reports will appear in December. 



I^m*sil l*iMi|[£i*aiii M Avaiilahli^ Vuv .S|ii»iisiii*>»lii|i 



lew Enifland 



t 



Families: 2,353,000 Radio Families: 2,280,000 
Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 

Connecticut 



Jiivi^iiilc 



TITLE 


APPEAL 


RATING 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST- 


DESCRIPTION 


CITY 


STATION 


CHILDREN'S CONCERT HOUR 


Family 


N. A. 


30-inin 


1 


O.R. 


Recorded classical music introducefl by 
four children ages 8-12 


Chicopee, 
Mas). 


WACC 


SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE PARTY 


I'lvn-age 


N. A. 


90-min 


I 


175 


AM-mail-rcquest program with Lou 
Weinman as mc 


Bridgeport, 
Conn. 


WIUI 


WATERVILLE BOY J CLUB 
CAMARADERIE 


Adult 


N. A. 


30-iiiin 


I 


0. R 


Program for advancement of local youth 

orKaiiizatioiis 


Wat«rviUe. 

Mailif 


WTVL 



^liiMi4* 



BOX AT THE OPERA 


I'uiiiily 


7.5- 
10 2H 


30-min 1 


$11.'. |ilu~ R.-i orded operatic arias; notes by WTIC 
timr music expert R. E. Smith 


Hartford, WTIC 
Conn. 


YOUNG STARS ON PARADE 


I'uinily N. A. 


30-min 1 


$50 { Features voung local musicians ages ' Waterburv, WBRY 
1 4-18 i Conn. 



Xi'ws 



l|iiix 



LOCAL AND WORLD NEWS 


Falllll> 


.\. A. 


15-iuin 


li 


$32 plus 
$3tal 


Show prepared b.^ ix-iicwsnian Charlie 
Thompson (7:15 pm) 


New Londuh, 
Conn. 


WNLC 


LOCAL NEWt 


Women 


N. A. 


13-min 


6 


$16 plus 
$3tal 


Midday news show beats (only local) 
afternoon paper 


New London, 
Coon. 


WNU 


NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$97 (5) 
tll6(6) 


Local, regional, national, international, 
staff-edited (7:30 am) 


Worcester, 
Maas. 


WNES 


NEWSCASTS 


F:imilv 


N A 


15-min 


f. 


1402 


Local, regional, national news 


l-iwrenrr. 

M:u- 


WlAW 



CINDERELLA WEEK END 


WOMH'II 


\ \ :tii-iiiiu 

1 


.1 


$55 i»r 
spot 


l)aii.\' prizes and wefkl.\- grand prize of 
week end in New York 


Hartford. 
Conn. 


WTIC 


tUESS THE TUNE 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$100 


Tunes aiid theater tickets to those who 
identify five old tunes 


Bridgeport, 
Conn. 


WHAt 


JIM-JAMBOREE 


Family 


5.5 


90-min 


5 


$80 per 
15-min 


Music, fun, and five poasible quii winners 
each day 


Waterbur>-. 
Conn. 


WMV 


MUSICAL QUIZ 


Family 


N. A. 


60-inin 


6 


0. R. 


First to answer musical question wins 

choice of next tune 


Gardner, 
M>uK 


WHO! 



S|M»I*IS 



BUMP HADLEY 


.Men 


5.4 H 


15-min 


li 


$247 


Sports news :ind coniinentary, including 
sohoollMiy games 


Boston 
Man. 


WBZ 


HUNTING AND FISHING 


Men 


N. A. 


IS-min 


1 


$62 


Cliff Davis with hint; on where, how, to 
get 'em ; anecdotes 


Bostoo, 
Man. 


wu 


SPEAKING OF SPORTS 


Men 


8.2 C 


15-inin 


6 


$185 


John A. Cluney does sports news, inter- 
views with sports figures 


Waterbury, 
Conn. 


WUY 


SPORTS TIME 


Men 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$192 


Veteran sportscasler Al \'e.'itro gives 
inside slant on sports news 


Waterburv, WWCO 
Conn. 



Woiik'ii'n l*arlii*i|iaiiii;^ 



IT'S A WOMAN S WORLD 



«..■■:.„ N \ 



$'.' 2.S p<T Women's iriiiTi>l ii.»-, s :ii u n.' 

-|~'I ■ ..1. liilar of ( Itil. i\. iil~ 



M ;-. 



• Time and talent unless otherwise indicated. N.A.-Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conlan, P-Pulse, E-H - Elliott-Hayes; O.R. -On Request 
42 SPONSOR 




cisEi^ 



Cann" 



in9 



crop 



\t\9 



COS 



fOi^ 



A conn 
and ^ . -■ 



for P 



icki'^S- 



The peak of the berry crop arrives in Michigan 
...and all good housewives start canning. It's as simple as that. 
Those gals don't care that the Indiana berries 
came in last week . . . or that Minnesota berries won't be ready 
for ten more days. Not at all. But you can be sure the Kerr Glass 
Manufacturing Corp. cares. They want sales in Indiana, Minne- 
sota, Michigan . . . and in 45 other states, too. 

Obviously, they need fast-moving, hard-hitting 
advertising, an(/ they get it with Spot Radio. For 10 years this 
flexible medium has been used from coast to coast . . . exactly 
when and where crop and selling conditions w^ere ripest. 
Today, requests for the Kerr Canning Booklet are greater 
than ever, and cost-per-inquiry has hit a new low. 

Ask your John Blair man how Spot Radio 
can solve your toughest selling problems. Chances are 
he'll come up with the answer. 












^CS-G 



^^Ht. 



I«7 


















P 



''^^T BUY / 






I 



& COMPANY 



LEADING RADI 



I 



Offices in ChicaEO • New York • Detroit • St. Louis • los Angeles • Sin Frincisci 



NOVEMBER 1947 



43 



spot 


1 




















APPEAL 


RATINfi 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


con» 


DEKRIPTION 


CITY 






TITU 


nATION 


KENNEIEC CAUNDAI 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


O.K. 


Diary of social functions, radio fashion 
catalogue, kitchen bints 


WaterviUe. 
Maine 


WTVL 


MODCRN KITCHEN 


Women 


N. A. 


18-min 


S 


0. R. 


Interviews with chefs, cooking hinta, 
recipes, party ideas 


Worcester. 
Mass. 


WTAG 


MODERN WOMAN 


Women 


N. A. 


IS-min 


6 


0. R. 


Women's news, fashions, etc. Ua« par- 
ticipHting public service spots 


Worcester, 
Mass. 


WTAG 


OPEN HOUIE 


Women 


N. A. 


30-mio 


S 


U per 

spot 


Program, with emcee Lee Spencer, ii io 
its fourth year. News 


Portsmouth, 
N.H. 


WHEB 


SHOPPING lY MDIO 


Women 


N. A. 


30-miB 


3-5 


149.89 for 
3 tpota 


Shoppers interviewed by mobile unit, 
taken to studio for prites 


Hartford. 
Conn. 


WDRC 


SHOPPER'S SPECIAL 


Women 


5.5 


105-min 


3-6 


S49.89for 
3 spots 


Mobile unit calls on homes, and house- 
wives receive products 


Hartford, 
Conn. 


WOK 


SWAPPER'S CLUB 


Women 


10.4 C 


15-min 


5 


$138.50 


Ruth ReJdini^ton emcees listeoere who 
want to swap items 


Keene. 
N.H. 


WKNE 


WE, THE WOMEN 


Women 


N. A. 


30-inin 


5 


$7 per 
spot 


Music and women's news with Eunice 
Oreenwood 


Hartford, 
Coon. 


WTHT 


WOMEN'S MATINEE 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


»3fl 75 


Jo .\nn Walkover read^ womeo'c news, 
handles interviews, music 


Burlingtoi). 
Vt. 


wjor 



Uiddle iltlantic 

Families: 9,653,000 Radio Families: 9,166,000 

New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Washing- 
ton, D. C, West Virginia, Virginia 




llrsiiiia 



TITLE 


APPEAL 


RATING 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST" 


DESCRIPTION 


CITY 


STATION 


CHILDREN'S THEATER 


Juvenile 


.\. A. 


15-inin 


1 


$45 
talent 


Kiddie casts enact adaptations of 
classics, original stories 


Baltimore, 
Md. 


WFBR 


SUGAR -N SPICE 


Juvenile 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


$75 B time 
$85 A time 


Drama plus audience participation. 
Priics in question session 


Jamestown, 
N. Y. 


WJTN 


TILLIE LOU 


Juvenile 


N.A. 


15-min 


6 


$35 per 

spot 


Juvenile senal with slant to good man- 
ners and Ijchavlnr 


Schenectadv, 


WGY 



•liivoiiilo 



FIVE O'CLOCK SPECIAL 


12-lSyrs 


N. A. 


30-iiiin 


5 


11 li. 


Jive record show slanted at the teen- 
age trade. Requests 


(irt-ensburg, 
Pa. 


WHJB 


IT'S TEEN TIME 


12-17 yrs 


N.A. 


30-min 




$22.40 


Two teen-agers act as junior disk 
jocke.vs, do commercials 


Indiana, 
Pa. 


WDAD 


KIDDIES KARNIVAL 


6-12 yrs 


N. A. 


30-min 




0. R. 


Child talent show with adult emcee. 
Local slant 


Johnstown, 
Pa. 


WABO 


GUDYS LYLE JUNIOR CLUB 


6-12 yrs 


N.A. 


30-min 




0. R. 


Kid show originating in a local theater. 
Lyie is at the organ 


Norfolk, 
Va. 


WSH 


MOTHER GOOSE 


4-S yrs 


N.A. 


15-min 




$110 


Saturday morning kiddies-and-motheis, 
song-and-story show 


Buffalo, 
N. Y. 


WCR 


TRIPLE B RANCH 


8-12 yrs 


N.A. 


30-miD 




0. R. 


"Foreman" Bob Smith with contests, 
prizes, fun for bo>-s 


New York 

aty 


WNBC 


UNCLE TED 


4-10 yrs 


N.A. 


15-min 




$62. 13 


"Uncle Ted" Eiland reads the Sunday 
comics to the moppets 


Huntington, 
W. Va. 


WSAZ 


WORD STORIES 


4-6 yrs 


2.8 


15-min 




$215 


Educational stories slanted at the 
younger listeners 


New York 
City 


WOR 


YOUNG BOOK REVIEWERS 


12-15 yrs 


N. A. 


30-min 




$250 


Junior book-reww panel, ages 12-15 
iliscuss, meet author- 


New York 


WMCA 



>l«iii-<»ii-lli«^->iiriM^I 



KURBSTONE KWI2 


l:i.inly 


N A. 


l.5-[iiiri 


■'' 


*lii7 .'.i 


I'assors-hy are intervneweJ, giwn basket 
of fruits 


Wilkes-Banc. 
Pa. 


WILK 


LET'S VISIT 


Family 


N.A. 


30-min 


1 


0. R. 


Dorothy Day and Jack Lacy do remote 
ad lib visits 


New York 
City 


WINS 


ON THE SCENE 


Family 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


$210 


Bill Barrett wire-records at scene of 
local stories 


Beekley, 
W. Va. 


WAS 


OUIZ-A-TUNE 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


r, 


$<10 


Passers-by identify luiie pla>i-d from 

-tllillo to .■itre. 1 


Norfolk, 


WLOW 



* Time and talent unless otherwise indicated. N.A. -Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conlan, P-Pulse, E-H - Elliott-Hayes; O.R.-On Request 
44 SPONSOR 



f\0' 



WSAI IS frankly commercial 



Three of Cincinnati's downtown department stores use daily 
programs for straight selling purposes. Combined, they 
sponsor two hours a day on WSAI. 

The men who buy time for these stores are alert and promotion- 
minded. To them, commercial impact is more fundamental 
than audience index. Vet not one single listener may be 
offended — too many brands are at stake in a department 
store. 

Doing this job for dependable retailers day after day and 
year after year has characterized WSAI in our community. 
It is the result of studied technique. 

You have known of an acceptance plus for your printed message 
when you placed it in certain magazines and newspapers. 
This applies to radio stations and particularly to WSAI. 



UU Q A I Avery -Knodel, Inc. 

■■ w ^m I American Broadcasting Co. 

Cincinnati, Ohio a Marshall field station 



NOVEMBER 1947 45^ 



spot 



IlILt 


TIMES 
APPEAL RAIINO LtNtlH PER KKEEK COSf DEJCRIPIION CIII STATION 


ROVING MICROPHONE 


Family N. A. 1 IS-mio 1 | 129 1 Interview show with a wire recorder 1 Warren, WNAE 

1 '1 1 Pa. 



>lll^ii4* 



JOHNNY ANDREWS SHOW 


\\ ^ \ \ -'.'i I. ; J" SiiiKs dt-ilii-ali-d to annivi-niariefi; liv.- N.-w V.-l. WNEW 

orrhcstra accompaniiiient <"it> 


SLIM BRYANT ft HIS WILDCATS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


2 


1608.50 


6:15 pm brings folk, popular sooga, 
western ballads 


Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 


KOKA 


CURTAIN CALLS 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


6 


tiso 


Albums from current, past B'way, 
H'wood hits: automobile tips 


New York 
City 


W«VN 


DREAM AWHILE 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


3 


S15 

talent 


Features Marge Warren at piano, and 
mc with informal touch 


Ft. Wa>Tie, 
Ind. 


W6L 


RUTH ETTING SHOW 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


12000 


Sentimental songe, today and yesterday; 
Ruth and husband chat 


Sew York 
City 


WHN 


HOUR OF NOCTURNE 


Women 


N. A. 


90-min 


6 


0. R. 


Greatest in opera, symphonic, chamber 
music; 10-11:30 pm 


Philadelphia. 
P». 


WDAS 


IMPRESSIONS IN MUSIC 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


0. R. 


PopuUr music alternates weekly with 
background music from films 


Troy, 
NY. 


WTBY 


FRANK LUTHER SHOW 


Juvenile 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


$424 


Live, recorded music; philosophical com- 
ments 


New York 

aty 


WNBC 


MAGIC MELODIES 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


$308.25 


Two pianos, guitar, organ, vocalist in 
smooth arrangements 


PitUburgh, 
Pa. 


KOKA 


MUSICAL RAINBOW 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


3-fl 


$76(3 
per week) 


Special music to show off quality of FM 
broadcasting ■> 


New York 

aty 


W6YN- 
FM 


MUSICANA 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


3 


0. R. 


Classical, light ballad recordings intro- 
duced by A. Roger Kelly 


PitUburgh. 
Pa. 


WJAt 


MUSIC FROM HOLLYWOOD 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


7 


$54 


Records of De Vol, King Sisters, Hal 
Derwin, Peggj- Lee, Four of a Kind 


Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa. 


WIZZ 


MUSIC OF MANHATTAN 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$315.60 


NBC Thesaurus; 6:45 pm 


Savannah, 
Ga. 


WUV 


NICHOLSON ft CUY 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$75 
talent 


Arranger Bobby Nicholson, singer 
Jeffrey Clay, 15-piece orch 


Buffalo, 
X. Y. 


WKBW 


POLKA PARADE 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


2 


$150 per 
broadcast 


All-request live show with violin and 
accordion 


Trenton. 
N.J. 


WTTM 


SHOW TIME 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$108 


Musical fancies of yesterjear, notes on 
the great personalities 


Annapolis. 
MdT 


WANN 


STUMP US 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$30 talent 
per broadcast 


Listeners try to stump pianist, singer 
with tune requests 


Baltimore, 
Md. 


WCAO 


KATHRYN WOOD SHOW 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


$15 

talent 1 


Classical, semi-classical songs; violin, 

piano aocompaniment 


Norfolk, 

Va 


WGH 






N^'ws 



MARK AUSTAO. NEWS 


A. lull 


N. A. 


15-iMin 


5 


J4M 
talent 


Same spot for three years. News com- 
mentary and reporting 


Washington, 
D. C. 


WWDC 
WWDC-FM 


BILL AUSTIN, NEWS 


Family 


8.5 


10-min 


6 


$150 


Evening newscast with heavy play of 
feature news 


Huntington, 
W. Va. 


WPLH 


JANE ELLEN BALL 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


3 


0. R. 


News to women, interviews, and cine 
gossip by woman reporter 


Pittsburgh. 
Pk. 


WJAS 


BROADWAY LULUBY 


Adult 


N. A. 


5-min 


3 


$60 


Digest of goings-on about town in 
theater, clubs, etc. 


Woodside. 
N. Y. 


wwn. 


COHENING THE TOWN 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


0. R. 


Harold Cohen, local drama critic, gives 
screen chatter 


Pittsburgh. 
Pa. 


WJAS 


COMMUNITY NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


0. R. 


Only source for local news via radio in 
in this city 


Frederick. 
Md. 


WFMO 


MEADE DAVIDSON 


Adult 


N. A. 


10-min 


5 


$200 


Commentary, featuring interviews with 
UN delegates 


Woodside. 
N. Y. 


WWRL 


EVENING EDITION 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$210 


Evening roundup of news, sports, local 
items by WJL^ news editor 


Beckley. 
W. Va. 


WJU 


IT HAPPENED DURING THE WEEK 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


$25 


A recap of the week's top news events in 
world and local 


McT 


WANM 


JAMESTOWN IN REVIEW 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


$37.50 


Tape or e.t. interviews, review of week's 
local news 


Jamestown. 
NY. 


WJTN 


FRANK KINGDON 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


$225 


Kingdon comments incisively on the 
week's events 


New York 
City 


WOB 


LOCAL AND COUNTY NEWS 


Adult 


N. A. 


10-min 


5 


$S5.50 


Slanted to women. Show uses 15 differ- 
ent county news sources 


Cniontown. 
Pa. 


WMBS 


MARYLAND NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


IV-min 


5-6 


$35 

talent 


Follows local sportscast, uses late local 
and state news 


Baltimore. 
Md. 


WFBB 


NEWS AT FIVE 


Family 


N. A. 


5-min 


5 


$75 


Only Norfolk station with a newscast 
near this hour 


Norfolk. 
Va. 


WLOW 


NEWS AT NOON 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$S71 for 


Newscast prepared by NBC Newsroom, 
aireil b> Radcliffc Hall 


New York 


WNBC 



Time and talent unless otherwise indicated. N.A.-Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conl«n, P-Pul$^ E-H - Elliott-Hayes, O.R.-On Requert 



46 



SPONSOR 






WHN does it agairi! 



6ILLB0ARD1 

PIRST AWARD I 
I94fc 
WHN 
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fOAV Ted HUS»r^f,D 



•^ 



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/^ 



N 



TED HUSING'S BANDSTAND PROMOTION 
WINS SINGLE CAMPAIGN DIVISION 
INDEPENDENT STATIONS OVER 5,000 WATTS 
BILLBOARD 1947 RADIO PROMOTION EXHIBIT 

Last year it was WHN's Sports. This year, again, another 
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advertisers get intensive promotional support for their cam- 
paigns, plus showmanship, plus fifty -thousand-watt clear channel 
coverage, in America's greatest market. 

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50,000 Watts -1050 Clear Channel 



spot 



IIUI 


IIMES 
APPEAL RATING LENGTH PER WEEK COST DEJCRIPTION ciTr STATION 


NEWS. tVERY HOUR 


Fuuily 


N. A. 


3-miu 


72 


0. R. 


A.I'. uewB on ihe hour from b am to 7 pm 


Pfailadelpfaia. 


WOAt 


NEWS or THE WORLD 


Family 


10. 8 C 


15-mio 


6 


tl34.40 


First complete newgcait of the day, with 
weather reporta 


Warren, 
Pa. 


WNAE 


PERIPECTIVE ON THE WEEK'S 

NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


IS-miD 


1 


»40 


Author Roy Morgan airs an aoaiysis of 
the week's news 


Wilkes-Bam, 
Pa. 


WILK 


T:00 A.M. NEWS 


Adult 


N. A. 


S-min 


6 


$30 
talent 


Wake-up newscast of world, national 
and local events 


Baltimore, 
Md. 


WCAO 


BECKLEY SMITH, NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-mio 


12 


0. R. 


Just completed 11 years with same 
sponsor 


Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 


WMS 


STAPLETON REVIEWS THE NEWS 


Adult 


N.A. 


30-mio 


6 


0. R. 


Three parts: Local; comment on week's 
news; interviews 


Syncuse, 
N. Y. 


WNOI 


Tfll-STATE NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


lO-min 


6 


$193.20 


News of West Va., Ohio and Kentucky 
plus local news 


Huntington, 
W.V^. 


WSAZ 


JOHN VON BERGEN, NEWS 


Adult 


8.4 


IS-min 


6 


$250 


Local, national, and world news from 
U.P. and local sources 


Scran ton. 
Pa. 


WARM 


WKAL NEWS 


Family 


N.A. 


I5-min 


6 


$158 


Straight newscast by Michael Carlo 


Rome, 
N. Y. 


WKAL 


A WOMAN'S NOTEBOOK 


Women 


N. A. I5-mio 


5 $107.20 


News notes to women, with f<>atupe8 and 

inff-rvic-A-^ 


Wilkes-Barre. 


WILK 



>«vi»llv 



CALtNDAH UF CHARACTER 


1 ..li.ll.. 


.\. .V. 


1^-iiiii. 


J-o 


$35 lalciit 
per show 


lielerie (.iriiliaui aiialyiei! tUoiinUf Ifuiu 
month of birth 


b^ulllnuri', 

Md. 


WFBR 


CONVERSATION AT EIGHT 


Family 


N.A. 


30-miD 


1 


$200 
talent 


Author Tom Sugrue interriews well- 
known personalities 


New York 

aty 


WINS 


DAPPER DAN TIME 


Women 


N.A. 


30-min 


5 


0. R. 


Dapper Dan Martin ad libs, and spins 
disks 


Frederick, 
Md. 


WFHD 


DREAM WEAVER 


Family 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


$715.50 


Paul Shannon reads inspirational poetry 
against organ background 


Pittsburgh, 
Pi. 


KOKA 


GREEN AND GOLD ROOM 


Family 


N.A. 


45-niin 


1 


$50 


Simulated night-club variety show using 
records; background noise 


Baltimore, 
Md. 


WCBM 


LABOR ARRITRATION 


Adult 


2.3 


60-min 


1 


$250 
talent 


Labor expert Samuel R. Zack heads 
panel of guest experts 


New York 
City 


WMCA 


LUNCHEON AT SARDI'S 


Family 


1.3 H 


30-min 


5 


$600 


Interviews with celebrities at restaurant 


New York 

aty 


WNEW 


MYSTERY AT EIGHT 


Family 


N.A. 


30-min 


5 


$75 15-min 
$125 30-min 


Transcribed mysteries across the board 
every night at 8 


New York 
City 


WNEW 


PINEY HOLLOW HOE-DOWN 


Family 


N.A. 


30-min 


2 


$200 per 
30-min 


Quadrilles, hoe-downs, reels, etc., with 
square dance calls 


Trenton, 
N.J. 


WTTM 


VAUGHN-S AUDITION TIME 


Family 


N. .\. 


30-min 


1 


$42.40 


Listeners vote for best amateur. Every 
seventh week winners compete 


Nanticoke, ' WHWL 
Pa. 



l|iii% 



ANSWER MAN 


Familly 


1.2 H 


5-min 


6 


$925 


Erudite "Answer .Man" replies to 
listener's mailed-in questions 


New York WOR 
City 


RECORD RIDDLES 


Family 


2.6H 


15-min 


6 


$95 per 
spot 


Guess identity of mystery records 
pla.ved by emcee 


New York WOI 

aty 



S|MII*i>i 



CHOSJ VIEWS OF SPORIS NEWS 


.\Uult 


.s .\ 


15-1)1111 


$l'..s 
1 


Production sportscast show with various 
running features 


HuiltlDgtOll. 

W. \a. 


WPLH 


BILL DIEHL SPORTS 
PARADE 


Adult 


N.A. 


15-min 


6 


$30 
talent 


Commentary on national and local 
sports events 


NoKolk. 
Va. 


W6H 


FOOTBALL GAMES 


Family 


N.A. 


120-min 


2 


$100 per 
show 


I/ocal high school and college football 
games, play-by-play 


Wilkcs-Bane. 
Pk. 


WIZZ 


JACK GUINAN'S SPORTS 
SUMMARY 


Men 


N.A. 


15-miD 


6 


$135 


Follows newscast in evening. Complete 
sports roundup 


Jamestown, 
N. Y. 


WiTN 


STAN LOMAX 


Men 


6.2 H 


15-min 


3 


$90 talent 
per show 


Veteran sportscaster Stan Lo nax gives 
late sports news 


New York 

aty 


MOB 


RAY MARTIN, SPORTS 


Men 


6.4 C 


15-min 


6 


$90 


Emphasis on local sports, by Ray 
Martin 


Middletown, 
NY. 


WAU 


BOB PRINCE. SPORTS 


Men 


N.A. 


IS-min 


6 


0. R. 


"Has the highest sportscaster Hooper in 
Pittsburgh": WJAb 


Pittsburgh, 
P*. 


wut 


SPORTS CLINIC 


Juvenile 


N.A. 


30-min 


1 


$300 


Sol's clubs receive advice on sports from 
guests. Prises 


Philadelphia, 
Pa. 


rnni 


SPORTSMEN'S CLUB 


Men 


N.A. 


15-min 


2 


$110 


Like FimhinM mnj Hunting Club, with 


Wilkes-Barre. 

Pa 


WILK 



48 



Tiir.e and lalcnt unlcis clhtrwis* indicated. N.A. -Net Available, H-Hoop«r, C-Conl«n, P-Pul$e, E-H - Elliott-Hayes, O.R.-On Request 

SPONSOR 






TITLE 


APPEAL 


RATING 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST* 


DESCRIPTION 


CITY 


STATION 


SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTt 


Men 


N. A. 


15-niin 


5 


$122.50 


Coverage of local and national sports 
news, interviews 


Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa. 


WILK 


SUNDAY SCOREBOARD 


Men 


N. A. 


lO-min 


1 


$25 


Recap of sports news for the week end 


Annapolis, 
McT 


WANN 


WBLK SPORTS NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


10-min 


6 


$128.12 


Local and wire-service news of sports 


Clarksburg, 
W. Va. 


WBLK 


WHIRL AROUND WORLD OF 
SPORTS 


Men 


N. A. 


I5-min 


6 


$675 


Late news, background stories, forecasts, 
guest interviews 


PitUburgh, 
Pa. 


KDKA 


WINTER SPORTS 


Family 


N. A. 


45-min 

(approx) 


2-4 


$10,000 season 
of 00 games 


Professional ice hockey, and basketball 
from nine Arena 


Washington, 
D. C. 


WWOC 

WWDC FM 



spot 



Women's Psirti^'ipsitiiii;^ 



MARGARET ARLEN SHOW 


Women 


iN. A. 


30-min 


6 


$702, 6 
spots a wk 


.•\. M. hou.sewife show. Wide range of 
subjects with feminine appeal; guests 


New York WCBJ 
City 


AROUND THE TOWN 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


0. R. 


Cooking recipes, household hints, beauty 
news all given by A. Christy 


Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 


WJAS 


BLESSED EVENTER 


Women 


N. A. 


30-min 


6 


$45 for 
6 spots 


Ray Schneider congratulates homes of 
new-born babies 


Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 


WWSW 


DOROTHY DAY 


Women 


N. A. 


30-min 


5 


0. R. 


Household hints, menus, fashions, bud- 
get ideas; interviews 


New York 
City 


WINS 


HERE'S LOOKING AT YOU 


Women 


N. A. 


30-min 


5 


$100 
per spot 


Richard Willis aids participants in im- 
proving personal appearance 


New York 
City 


WNEW 


ANICE IVES 


Women 


N. A. 


25-min 


5 


$50 per 
spot 


Women's Commentary-Participations 


Philadelphia, 
Pa. 


WFIL 


KATHY COMES CALLING 


Women 


14. 8C 


15-min 


5 


$45,6 
spots a wk 


Program of delightful music and inter- 
esting chatter 


Jamestown, 
N. Y. 


WJTN 


LADIES' DAY AT WCBM 


Women 


N. A. 


60-min 


5 


$75 per 5 
spots a wk 


Prizes, music, eight contests 


Baltimore, 
Md. 


WCBM 


LADIES MAN WITH TOBEY & TINY 


Women 


N. A. 


30-min 


5 


$400—5 
spots per wk 


Women's food quiz 


New York 

aty 


WOR 


LADIES, THIS IS FOR YOU 


Women 


N. A. 


30-min 


6 


$180 


Participation show held in local restau- 
rant. Prizes 


Beckley, 
W.Va. 


WWNR 


OTHER PEOPLE'S BUSINESS 


Women 


N. A. 


25-min 


5 


$125 per 
5 spots 


Guest per day interviewed by Alma 
Dettinger 


New York 
City 


WQXR 


RUN OF THE HOUSE 


Women 


N. A. 


30-min 


5 


$125, 5 
spots a wk 


Charlotte Adams discusses world and 
community problems; household hints 


New York 
City 


WQXR 


SECOND CUP 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$100 
talent 


Fifteen minutes of casual comment 


^S^. 


WTRY 


THIS AND THAT WItIi MONA AND 
PAT 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$187.50 


Two sisters poke fun at each other as 
they discuss current topics 


Woodside. 
N. Y. 


WWRL 


ANN VOUGH VISITS 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


0. R. 


Material on Home — Gardens 


Greensburg, 
Pa. 


WHJB 


BARBARA WELLES 


Women 


1.5H 


30-min 


5 


$500, 5 
spots per wk 


Women's chatter and gossip 


New York 

aty 


WOR 


VIRGINIA WELLS 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$51.25.5 
spots a wk 


News of Women's Organizations around 
town 


Binghamton, 
N.Y. 


WINR 


YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBOR 


Women 


3.5 


15-min 


5 


$22.50 
per spot 


Twelve-year-old participation-program 


Baltimore, 
Md. 


WCAO 



SoDthern 



Families: 8,380,000 Radio Families: 6,399,000 

Arkansas, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carohna, Tennessee, 
Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas 




Dr SI Ilia 



TITLE 


APPEAL 


RATING 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST* 


DESCRIPTION 


CITY 


STATION 


GOLDEN WEDDING 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


$37.50 


Skits featuring highlights in lives of 
couple 


Huntsville, 
Ala. 


WFUN 


TELLER OF CURIOUS TALES 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


0. R. 


Spine-tickling mysteries handed down 
from one generation to next 


Huntsvill'. 
.\la. 


WFUN 



Time and talent unless otherwise indicated. N.A.-Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conian, P-Pulse, E-H - Elliott-Hayes; O.R.-On Request 
NOVEMBER 1947 49 



spot 



•liivoiiili^ 



mil 


APPEAL 


RATINS 


LENGIH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST' 


OEICRIPTWN 


CITY 


STATION 


HEALTHY. WEALTHY AND WISE 


'• 12yr8 


N. A. 


30-iuin 


1 


$35 talrnt 
$IS pnm 


Quiiies, Btunte, games; studio audience 


Lxiuisville, 
Ky. 


WAVE 


TOTI PLAYHOUtE 


i-5 \rs 


S. .\. 


25-iiiin 


1 


0. R. 


.StorieB arid n-fords for lots and iiiOthiTb 


Ni-w OrU-k/iK. 


wotu 



>lsiii-oii-lli4'-SiriM'l 



MAN ON THE STftEET 



I'ri'-bH-X. alarm rlixk k'""- '*^ 'I'jriiit: -Uuv^, 






>liisi€* 



BOB AND HIS GIRL FRIENDS 


W... 


S A 


15-min 


■' 


11 l{. 


llob .MesK:ll fpitis di£ik.v ul lour ttnutli- 
singing starn daily 


Auguii.t 
(la. 


ABBQ 


CECIL BROWER-S WESTERN BAND 


Family 


N. A. 


25-min 


8 


0. R. 


Pop tunes as well as western music by 
this live talent group 


Odeasa. 

Tex. 


KECK 


CASCADES OF MELODY 


Family 


N. A. 


25-roin 


5 


$84.30 
5 15-min 


Popular hit tunes or today and yesterday 


Durhftm, 
N. C. 


WTIK 


FOUR HAWAIIANS 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


$16.92 
per spot 


Live Hawaiian music group, aUo plays 
current pop tunes 


Florence, 

AU. 


WHTT 


JIVE FIVE 


Family 


N. A. 


30-miD 


5 


0. R. 


On air six years with this live Dixieland- 
style group. (Juests 


New Orleans, 
La. 


WWL 


MELODY DEPARTMENT 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$72 


BMI script used with recorded music. 
Srogram notes on bands 


Ft. Pierce. 
Fla. 


WIU 


MUSICAL CARAVAN 


Women 


N. A. 


30-min 


6 


$150 
6 15-min 


Musical tour around foreign lands, with 
appropriate songs 


West Memphis, 
Ark. 


KWEM 


MUSIC BY REQUEST 


Women 


6.2C 


IS-min 


S 


$199.40 
5 15-min 


Phone requests played immediately by 
live novelty music group 


Savannah, 
Ua. 


WTM 


NEW SPANISH TRAIL 


Adult 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


$50 
talent 


Six-piece Mexican orchestra, girl vocalist. 
Rumbas, tangos, etc. 


Sao Antonio, 
Tex. 


WOAI 


AGGIE PICKIN-S 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


$150 


Live college-talent show with studio 
audience of 2,000 


College Sta- 
tion, Tex. 


WTAW 


REHEARSAL FOR A NERVOUS 
BREAKDOWN 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


3 


$4. 70 spot 
$2 talent 


Two-man act at piano and vocal. Much 
ad lib kidding around 


Andalusia, 
Ala. 


waA 


KENNY RENNER SHOW 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


3-5 


$66 
talent 


Renner sings smooth ballads for house- 
wife audience 


Louis>-iUe, 
Ky. 


WAVE 


BOB SMITH AND HIS RADIO PALS 


Family 


N. A. 


IS-nijn 


6 


$283.20 
6xl5-min 


Live talent group, seven years on this 
station 


Colombia, 
S.C. 


WIS 


SONG SHOP 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$304.25 


Cliff Cameron at the organ. Was spon- 
sored 2 years by drug chain 


Atlanta, 
Ga. 


WAIL 


SPOTLIGHT ON A STAR 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$125 


Thumbnail portraits of singing stars 
plus their records 


Port Arthur, 
Tex. 


KPAC 


SPOTLIGHT ON RHYTHM 


Family 


8.0 


30-min 


5 


0. R. 


Recorded and transcribed music 


Meridian, 
Miss. 


WTPK 


WAX MUSEUM 


.\dult 


N. A. 


25-min 


1 


0. R. 


B.'trbershop harmonies by a male quartet 


New Orleans, 


WDSU 



>«»\v« 



COMMUNITY PRESS 


i'aiiiily 


7.9 


15-Uiiii 


1 


J3U 


Local newscast with emphasis on com- 
munity betterment 


LaGrangi, 
Ga. 


WUG 


EARLY EDITION 


Family 


N. A. 


5-min 


6 


$43.20 


First news on daily schedule. Roundup- 
style 


Ft. Pierce, 
FU. 


WIU 


BOB FEAGIN AND THE NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$5 news 
charge 


Roundup newscast of local, state, and 
international news 


Ra. 


wroQ 


HOUSEWIFE CHATTER 


Women 


N. A. 


15-inin 


5 


$32.95 


Woman's news program, with book re- 
views, screen news, etc. 


Florence, 
Ala. 


WMFT 


IT HAPPENED UST NIGHT 


Family 


N. A. 


15-mia 


6 


0. R. 


Morning newscast that reaches a big 
farm audience 


Ixmgview, 
Tex. 


Knn 


JOURNAL OF THE AIR 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


S 


$72.90 


Roundup done in production format with 
three voices, sound effects 


DiUon, 
S.C. 


wosc 


UTE NEWS AND SPORTS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$41.54 


Review of day's news with late sports 
news, ball scores 


Florence, 
Fla. 


WMTT 


LISTEN UDIES 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


0. R. 


Women's interest news, fashions, movie 
news, musical numbers 


North Little 
Rock, Ark. 


KXLR 


LISTEN UDY 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$52.50 


Typical women's interest news show 


Macon, 
Ga. 


WBHl 


LOCAL NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


5-min 


6 


$25 


Summary of city and county news 


Palestine, 
Tex. 


KNET 


MATINEE AT MIDNIGHT 


Family 


N. A. 


60-min 


6 


0. R. 


"Disk -contorting" balance of news, 

k'ut.sls, jiv( ;iiid c!a.tsical niusic 


Chicago, 

i:: 


WBBM 



* Time and talent unless otherwise indicated. N.A.-Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conlan, P-Puisc, E-H-EllioH-Haycs,- O.R.-On Request 
50 SPONSOR 



FOR BALTIMORE ... A MARKET 
OF 192,146 MONEY SPENDING 



SCHOOL 



STUDENTS 



THEIR 




« ■!■■ ^.^H^. _ . .. mw^ ^ #' 

ANOTHER LrVE WFBR PROGRAM — ONE THAT CAN REALLY SELL THE BIG CASH MARKET 



Here is how you can wrap up 192,146 High and Prep 
School students of Baltimore into one package — and 
win their undying loyalty to your soft drink, gum, 
candy or other teen-age product. 

It's simple to do in Baltimore. WFBR's 4-year old 
"Scholastic Scrapbook" is now offered for sale, 
M.C.'dby one of Maryland's great athletes, featuring 
stars like Frankie Sinkwich as guest expert. "Scho- 
lastic ScrapfcooA" brings pre-game predictions — im- 
portant game results in Baltimore High and Prep 
school circles to the air each Friday, 7:00-7:15 P.M. 
Football, Basketball, Hockey, Baseball — every school 
sport is covered to keep intensive interest through- 
out the 39-week school year. 



But "Scholastic Scrapbook" is not just another 
Sport Show. It has a terrific "gimmick." Each week 
a corps of experts see all important games, select the 
"Unsung Hero" to be honored that week over "Scho- 
lastic Scrapbook. ' ' Not the fellows who v.'in headlines, 
but the many who contribute to their success. Rivalry 
between schools for the C. P. McCormick award as the 
best "Unsung Hero" of the season is intense — builds a 
high listening audience. 

Naturally, it is WFBR that airs such an interest 
arousing, live, local program. In Baltimore, WFBR 
is the live show station. That's why WFBR delivers 
for net and spot advertisers alike, more listeners per 
dollar than any other Baltimore station. 



WFBR-BALTIMORE 

ABC-5000 WATTS-AND 1.200,000 LISTENER FRIENDS 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE -JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



NOVEMBER 1947 



51 



spot 


1 




















TITLE 


APPEAL 


RATING 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST* 


DEURIPTION 


CITY 


STATION 


NEWS AND FARM REViEW 
NEWUAST 


Family 


N. A. 


30-inia 


S 


$110 


Divided into two periode. First ii news 
roundup, laat is farm news 


Orlando, 
Fla. 


WORZ 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


S 


173.83 


Straifiht summary of the local, state, 
and international news 


Asheville. 
N.C. 


WKIX 


NEtWS ROUNDUP 


Family 


N. A. 


IS-Diin 


11 


t32.9S6x wk 
t54 84 6i wk 


Two newscasta daily from AP sources 


Florence, 
Ala. 


wm 


NORVIN DUNCAN. NEWS 


Adult 


N. A. 


lO-mio 


S 


$3 talent 


Straight news supplemented by local 
coverage 


Greenville, 
S. C. 


WFBC 


THREE STAR EDITION 


Adult 


7.3 H 


IS-min 


5 


tlU.SOplua 
$12.5Utalc-nt 


Complete roundup, plus strong local 
coverage by Jim Cook 


Amarillo, 
Tei. 


KFOA 


TODAY'S NEWS 


Family 


N. A. 


IS-min 


S 


$198.50 
5xl5-min wk 


Tailored news summary for a state-wide 
audience 


Columbia, 
S.C. 


WIS 


VIEWS OF THE NEWS 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


*53.13 


Noontime commentary on the day's 
news 


Florence, 
Ala. 


WMfT 


W. C. TEAGUE AND THE NEWS 


Adult 


6.4 H 


IS-min 


6 


0. R. 


Commentary on the day's news by this 
veteran newspaperman 


Memphis. 
Tenn. 


WMC 


WORLDWIDE NEWS 


Adult 


N. A. 


IS-min 


6 


$76.50 


Summary of late world-wide news 


Pavagould, 


KOIS 


WOMAN OF THE DAY 


WoTIMli 


N. A 


15-niin 


.•i 5 


$51 3x wk 


Women in the news, society news, gossip, 
shopping hints 


Montgoni#*rv, 

Ala. 


WMCY 



>»|i4»rlM 



BILL MAPES. SPORTS 


\1 


\ \ 


'■'-' 




$54 n4 


StraJRht sporLs roundup, with occasional 
inter\-iews 


Florence-. 
Ala. 


WMFT 


DICK SMITH'S SPORTSWURL 


Men 


9.5 


10-min 


5 


0. R. 


Local and world sports 


Meridian, 
Miss. 


WTOK 


HIGHLIGHTS IN SPORTS 


Men 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


$100 


Sporta news and stories 


Montgomery, 
AU. 


WMGY 


JACK CUMMINS, SPORTS 


Men 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


0. R. 


Sports news and interviews by WPDQ's 
Sports Director 


Jacksonville, 
FU. 


WPDQ 


PIGSKIN PREVIEW 


Men 


N.A. 


15-min 


1 


$10 


Local slant. Art Mentor talks with local 
high school coaches 


Palestine, 
Tex. 


KNET 


SPORTS EXTRA 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$114.50 


Roundup coverage, exclusive in the 
Amarillo area. Interviews 


Amarillo, 
Tex. 


KFDA 


SPORTSMAN 


Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$96 


Roundup coverage of national and local 
sports news 


HarUviUe, 
S.C. 


WHSC 


SPORTS REVIEW 


Men 


N.A. 


10-min 


5 


0. R. 


Summary of late sports news and scores 


Florence, 
S.C. 


WOU 


SPORTS ROUNDUP 


Men 


N.A. 


5-min 


5 


$68 


Dave Banks, ace sports .and news man, 
docs fast summary 


Jackson, 
Tenn. 


WTJS 


SPORTS. SCORES. AND 
PERSONALITIES 


Adult 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


$155 


Sports comment and news 


N. Little Rock, 
Ark. 


KXLI 



\Voiii4^ii*K I*sirlii*i|i2iliii;;; 



AT HOME WITH ANNE OALY 


\\.,ii„h 


■t '.1 


25-riiiii 


.3 


n. K. 


Only woman's angle show in Jackson- 
ville. Hints, news, etc. 


Jacksonville, 
FU. 


WPDQ 


DATE WITH DOT 


Women 


N.A. 


25-min 


5 


0. R. 


Record show with news of interest to 
women 


Bi nnioffhain. 
Ala. 


WKAX 


HOMEMAKER 


Women 


N.A. 


30-min 


5 


$1.50 per 
spot 


Typical woman's show, with news and 
chatter 


Andalusia, 
Ala. 


WCTA 


HOUSEKEEPING A HOBDY 


Women 


N.A. 


15-min 


1-3 


$4 talent 
per b'cast 


Program on the air for 13 years. News, 
hints, recipes 


Greenville, 
S.C. 


WFBC 


JANE RECOMMENDS 


Women 


N.A. 


30-min 


5 


$20 per 
partic 


Civic affairs, woman's news, hobbies, 
etc. 


Miami, 

na. 


WGBS 


MARKET BASKET 


Women 


N. A. 


45-min 


5 


$17.50 per 

partic 


Movie news, cooking and homo hints, 
and music 


Tarboro. 

\ r 


WCPS 



Middle Western 

Families: 12,140,000 Radio Families: 11,387,000 

Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, Iowa, 
Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska 




•liivi^iiili' 



TITLE 


APPUL 


RATING 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
.PER WEEK. 


COST* 




DESCRIPTION 


1 CITY 


1 STATION 


CHILDREN'S PROGRAM 


Juvenile 


N A 


I.S-ii.in 


It 


(> K 


T*rocrani 


in ninth v, »r u.th rhil,l talent. 


! \orfnlk. 


' WES 



* Time and talent unless otherwise indicated. N.A. -Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conlan, P-Pulse, E-H - Elliott-Hayes,- O.R.-On Request 
52 SPONSOR 



TITLE 


APPEAL 


RATING 


LENGTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST* 


DESCRIPTION 


CITY 


STATION 


KIO KLUB 


Juvenile 


N. A. 


30-niin 


1 


130.46 


OrlKinatcs local theater, with live kid 
audience, quiz show 


Chickasha, 
Okla. 


KWCO 


TEEN-AGER'S SHOW 


12-19 yrs 


N. A. 


30-min 


5 


$100 


Local live kid talent on show, movie 
news, Kuest^i, Kags 


Applelon, 


WHBY 


U-SELECT-AND-WIN 


8-14 yrs 


N. A. 


30-niin 


1 


0. R. 


Contestants 8-14 identify live music se- 
lections for prizes 


Wichil;,, 
Kans. 


KANS 



spot 



Maii-oii-tlie-Str<^el; 



INQUIRING MIKE 


Kaiiiily 


5.0 H 


I5-[iiin 


5 


(). H. 


Movie tickets given to guests on this 
typic.^l interview show 


Dos .Vloines, 
Iowa 


K$0 


INTERVIEW ON MAIN STREET 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


0. R. 


Conducted from local theater lobby. 
Gift certificates 


Fostoria, 
Ohio 


WFOB- 
FM 


KLIZ GOES CALLING 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


2 


t40 


Tape-recorded interviews at county 
fairs, games, etc. 


Brainerd, 
Minn. 


KLIZ 


MAN ON THE STREET 


Family 


13. 5C 


15-min 


3 


$71.40 
plus prizes 


Informal interview show with gifts, 
special questions 


Crest on, 
Iowa 


KSIB 


PENNY FOR YOUR THOUGHTS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$117 


Gives away pennies; if guest's penny has 

right date, prizes 


Vincennes, 
Ind. 


WAOV 



Music 



AFFECTIONATELY YOURS 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$55 

talent 


Tenor Ken Ward sings pop tunes with 
organ accompaniment 


Cleveland, WTAM 
Ohio 


ANNIE'S ALMANAC 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


3 


$75 
talent 


Like old-time almanac, with hints, live 
music, chatter 


Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


WIBC • 


CONCERT HALL 


Family 


N. A. 


60-min 


7 


$108 


Full hour of classical and light classical 
music 


Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 


WFRS 


DIXIE FOUR 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


6 


$90 
talent 


Available Sat. morning. A live quar- 
tette, piano 


Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


WIBC 


EVENING MELODIES 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$106.25 


Smooth blend of clas.sical and popular 

transcriptions 


Shenandoah, 
Iowa 


KFNF 


HAWAIIAN INN 


Family 


4.8H 


30-min 


5 


$36.25 for 
5 spots 


Mythical-hotel-in-Hawaii format, with 
South Seas music 


TuLfa 
Okla. 


KFMJ 


LIFE, LOVE, AND LOUISE 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


0. R. 


Louise King's vocals, with news and 
comment 


Chicago, 
III. 


WBBM 


DOROTHY MARSHALL SINGS 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


1-6 


0. R. 


Girl singer with piano. Pop tunes, old 
favorites 


Alliance, 
Ohio 


WFAH 


MEMORY TIME WITH NANCY LEE 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


$106.25 


Memory tunes sung by Nancy Lee with 
piano background 


Shenandoah, 
Iowa 


KFNF 


STARDUST SERENADE 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


5 


0. R. 


Songs by Billy Leach, singer on the 
"Wayne King Show" 


Chicago, 

ni. 


WBBM 


THIS IS FOR YOU 


Family 


N. A. 


15-min 


I 


$150 


Live talent with 12-piece band, vocalists. 
Variety musical 


Youngstown, 
Ohio 


WFMJ 


TONES OF HARMONY 


Family 


N. A. 


30-min 


1 


0. R. 


Negro quintet with high local popularity. 
Spirituals 


Fostoria, 
Ohio 


WFOB- 
FM 


WFRS CONCERT HALL 


Adult 


N. A. 


55-min 


6 


$108 


Only regular concert hour show avail- 
able in western Michigan 


Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 


WFRS 



^ews 



BERNIE ANDERLEY, NEWS 


Family 


N.A. 


15-miu 


6 


$120 


News, with local guests who are in local 
news picture 


Bramerd, 
Minn. 


KLIZ 


COUNTRY EDITOR 


Family 


12.0 


15-min 


5 


$60 


Local items done in homey, informal 
style 


Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa 


WMT 


DUNBAR'S EVENING COMMENTARY 


Men 


10.7 H 


5-min 


5 


$185 


Commentary on national and inter- 
national news, local 


Kalamazoo, 
Mich. 


WKZO 


HERE'S TO THE LADIES 


Women 


N.A. 


15-min 


6 


$39 


Women's news show, with hints, fashions, 
music 


Alliance, 
Ohio 


WFAH- 
FM 


CHARLES HERMAN, NEWS 


Women 


4.7H 


15-min 


5 


$137 


National, state and local coverage in 
roundup form 


Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 


WUV 


LEE KRAMER 


Women 


23.2 C 


15-min 


3 


$65 


News for women, with some fashion 
hints, poetry 


Galesburg, 
111. 


WGIL 


LET'S TALK ABOUT THE WEATHER 


Family 


5.4 H 


5-min 


5 


$140 


Complete 3-day weather forecasts for 
farm and city 


Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


WFBM 


LISTEN UDIES 


Women 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


$76 


Homemaker news show, with local items, 
fashions, prices, etc. 


McAlestcr, 
Okla. 


KTMC 


LOCAL NEWS ROUNDUP 


Family 


12.5 


15-min 


7 


$48.80 per 
15-miii 


.All available local news, plus state news 


Canton, 
Ohio 


WHBC 



* Time and talent unless otherwise Indicated. N.A. -Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conlan, P-Puisc, E-H - Eliiott-Hayes; O.R.-On Request 
NOVEMBER 1947 53 



TITLE 


APPEAL 


RATIN8 


LENSTH 


TIMES 
PER WEEK 


COST* 


DESCRIPTION CITY STATION 


LUNCHEON NEWS 


Men 


N. A. 


IS-min 


5 


1240 


Newi, carried remote from civic club 
luncheons as inxtitutional 


Flini, 
Mich. 


WRRC 


NEWS OF THE DAY 


Family 


N.A. 


IS-min 


5 


tl06.25 


Follows Fulton Lewis; spota open at 
lieginninf! and end of show 


'To: 


WMRH 


NEWS TO WOMEN 


Women 


N. A. 


15-min 


S 


162.50 


Newscaat slanted to women with home- 
nuking items, price news 


Galesburg, 
III. 


W«iL 


NOON NEWS 


Family 


N.A. 


IS-mio 


6 


1175 


Midday newscast of general interest. 
Complete roundup 


Shenandoah, 
Iowa 


KFNF 


AIT ROBINSON, NEWS 


Family 


N.A. 


IS-mio 


S 


tl53.75 


Art Robinson, 15-year news veteran in 
radio in roundup 


Columbus, 
Ohio 


WHKC 


COURTNEY SMITH. NEWS 


Family 


N.A. 


IS-miD 


18 


0. R. 


Wire service and local news items in 
roundup form 


Evansville, 
Ind. 


WEOA 


TEN P.M. SATURDAY NEWS 


Adult 


N.A. 


15-min 


1 


0. R. 


Late evening roundup of the world, 
national, loc^ news 


Chicago, 
III. 


WHAQ 


VOICE OF THE NEWS 


Adult 


N.A. 


30-min 


6 


0. R. 


Roundtable discussion of the day's news 
by WJAC. news staff 


Norfolk. 
Nebr. 


WMt 


TONY WEITZEl 


V,|,,l. 


\ V 


V.,.n 


■■ 


$'i 1 r, 


News coiiimcntaPi' on events of a local 
nature 


Detroit, 
.Mieh. 


WWJ 



S|l<»l*tS 



rOM MANNING. SPORTS REPORTER 


Men 


5.3 H 


10-min 




talent 


.Manning. 20-.vear radio sports veteran, 
with general coverage 


Cleveland, 
Ohio 


WTAM 


AL NAGLER, SPORTS 


Men 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


0. R. 


Summar>' of world and local sports 
happenings 


Detroit, 
Mich. 


WJBK 


, SPORTRAITS 


Men 


2.5 H 


15-min 


2 


0. R. 


John Harrington reviews the sports news 
in drama style 


Chicago, 
lU. 


WBBM 


SPORTS DESK 


Men 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


0. R. 


Comment on sports news with guest 
interviews 


Des .Moines, 
Iowa 


KSO 


SPORTSMAN'S CORNER 


Men 


N.A. 


IS-min 


1 


$20 
talent 


Preview of week-end sports, hunting and 
fishing events 


Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


WIBC 


SPORTSMAN'S ROUND TABLE 


Men 


N.A. 


15-min 


1-3-5 


0. R. 


Board of four experts answers questions 
mailed by fans 


Chicago, 
lU. 


WBBM 


SPORTS REVIEW 


Men 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


S8.50per 
15-min 


Rapid-fire comment on the sports news; 
local slant 


Sweetwater, 
OkU. 


KXOX 


SPORTS ROUNDUP 


Men 


N.A. 


5-min 


6 


0. R. 


Wire-service sports news with local 
slant, late ball scores 


Norfolk, 
Nebr. 


WUG 


WSTV FIELD & STREAM CLUB 


.Adult 


N. A. 


15-min 


1 


0. R. 


For sportsmen and non-sportsmen, with 
anecdotes, tips, news 


Steuben\-ille, 

(Ihlo 


WSTV 



Variofv 



CLEVELAND CLAMBAKE 


Women 


5.0-7.0 H 


30-min 


5 


1600 


.\ftcmoon variety, with live audience, 
music, quijies, etc. 


Cleveland, wjmi 

Ohio 

1 


SUNNY SIDE UP 


Family 


N.A. 


30-min 


5 


0. R. 


Impromptu music, chatter, prises, studio 

audience, gags 


Dayton, 1 WINS 
Ohio 



WoiiM^ii\s l*»rlM*i|»aiiii|;$ 



JUNE BAKER 


\S Omen 


.\. A. 


30-inin 


6 


1400 for 
6 spots 


.N'ow in MthcoDseeutivayMr. dueago't 
top-rated femme ahow 


ag-r. 


W6N 


COOK BOOK TIME 


Women 


N.A. 


30-min 


6 


1 175 per month 
1 spot per day 


Hints and recipes, kitchen suggestions, 
women's news 


Shenandoah, 
Iowa 


KFNF 


FOR UOIES ONLY 


Women 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


$40.50 for 
5 spots 


Morning women's commentar)' show 
with news, hints, etc. 


Crestoo, 
Iowa 


KSIB 


HOUSEWIFE'S REQUESTS 


Women 


N.A. 


30-min 


5 


0. R. 


All-request show for housewives onl)'. 
Letters read on air 


Portamouth, 
Ohio 


WPAY 


LISTEN UOIES 


Women 


N.A. 


30-min 


5 


$145.85 wk; 
Spots 0. R. 


All-around show of news, music, chatter, 
gossip, interviews 


Joolin, 


WMm 


WOMEN'S CLUB OF THE AIR 


Women 


3.0 H 


30-min 


5 


$40 per 
spot 


Home forum type. Information, hints, 
interviews 


Cleveland, 
Ohio 


WTAM 


YOUR DAILY D02EN 


Women 


N.A. 


15-min 


5 


$57 wk; 
Spots 0. R. 


Contests, music, women's interest news, 
goRsip, hint.« 


Wis. Rapids, 
Wis. 


WFHI 



■ Time and talent unless otherwise indicated. N.A. -Not Available, H-Hooper, C-Conlan, P-Puisc, E-H-Elliott-Haye$ O.R.-On Request 

54 SPONSOR 




MR. SPONSOR ASKS: 

{Continued Jrom page 41) 

afforded the maximum protection from a 
station or networi< in holding option for 
such a time period. 

Gordon H. Mills 
Manager, Radio Departmeyit 
Kudner Ageyjcy Inc., N. Y. 

Obviously there 
can be no general 
rule which would 
protect advertisers 
since the circum- 
stances involved in 
building a time 
period are so 
varied. 

However, I 
firmly believe that 
some protection should be given to the 
advertiser since it's not only to the adver- 
tiser's benefit to build a higher listening 
quotient for his program, but it also bene- 
fits the network in the sale of time, by 
increasing the value to other advertisers 
of adjacent time periods. 

Of course, any network or station soon 
reaches a point of diminishing returns in 
holding a time period open for an adver- 
tiser and this necessarily limits the 
amount of protection which the advertiser 
should expect. Basically, the annual re- 
bate system is designed to make off- 
season advertising financially attractive 
to sponsors and thus avoid the necessity 
of holding open the time period. This 
may not be the answer in all cases. I am 
sure that no general rule can be evolved 
because the value of the program and the 
sponsor to the network or station varies 
in each case. 

Therefore, I feel that the matter of pro- 
tection must be worked out between the 
station or network and the adveitiser 
individually, and the amount of protec- 
tion given or received will depend entirely 
upon the relative bargaining power of the 
negotiators. 

John G. Hoagland 
Director of Radio 
Robert W. Orr, New York 



their allegiance to the new product. 
Every dairy at one time or another uses a 
juvenile program and sooner or later shifts 
from urging tots to "Ask mama to buy 
Razzle Dazzle Milk" to selling its prod- 
ucts on a factual basis direct to mama. 

Milk air advertising is credited with 
materially increasing the per capita con- 
sumption of dairy products during the 
last 10 years. Only the consumption of 
butter has gone down during the decade. 
Dairy increases show up in the following 
fashion : 

Per Capita Consumption 
Fluid Millc 19.?7 160.23 quarts 
Fluid Milk 1947* 200.46 quarts 



MILK ON THE AIR 

{Continued from page 20) 

youngsters — one of the reasons why the 
big dairies like the big bakers have shifted 
their appeals to adults. The bigger the 
give-away the more juvenile listeners and 
more sales which are activated by 
youngsters. The hitch is that when a 
competitor comes up with a bigger and 
better give-away the kids blithely shift 



Butter 


1937 


I(...S 


pounds 


Butter 


1947* 


10.0 


pounds 


Cheese 


1937 


5.6 


pounds 


Chee&e 


1947» 


7.0 


pounds 


Ice Cream 


19.37 


7.6 


quarts 


Ice Cream 


1947* 


19.0 


quarts 


Projected from current pro 


dttrt usage. 



Both of the national milk advertisers 
have run the gamut of programing. Only 
the Kraft division of National Dairy has 
been consistent from almost its air begin- 
ning, the Krajt Music Hall having started 
with Paul Whiteman at the helm in 1933 
and continued with Bing Crosby and now 




DENVER 



WANTED MORE 





Now two hours daily . . . 2:30 to 4:30 P. M. 



Birdseye Frosted Foods 
Blondex 
Clicquot Club 
Colgate's Ajox 
A & A Coal Co. 
Accurate Lock & Key Co. 
American Beauty Laundry 
Corlson-Frink Dairy 

Products 
Cool Heating Co. 
Cola Moca 



Columbia Records 

Durkee Margarine 

Kem Tone 

Sears Roebuck Gr Co. 

Culligon Soft Woter 

Denhom Theoter 

Electric Center 

Merritt Moving Cj Storage 

Miller's Super Markets 

Pedigree Shop 



Alexander Smith Carpets 

Swift Ice Cream 

Tintex 

Vicks Products 

Santa Fe Lumber Co. 

Sun Glo Venetian Blinds 

Sweetheart Floral Shop 

Tasty Foods 

Venetian Blind Laundry 

Weiss Venetian Blinds 

Wilson Trailers 



For Rates and Remaining Availabilities in the 
RAY PERKINS SHOW 

ASK A JOHN BLAIR MAN 

Or GENE O'FALLON, Manager, KFEL, Denver 



NOVEMBER 1947 



55 



Al Jolson down through the yc.irs without 
break except for summertiine replace- 
nients. This program has had a high 
rating, good sponsor identification, and 
sold Kraft products. 

While the Kraft Music \ lali was setting 
the pace for cheese-selling, the Sealtest 
part of the organization fooled around 
with longhair music and actually left the 
air for five years until the Sealtest Villane 
Store fomiula was developed. They've 
stuck with this through a number of stars, 
always doing a good selling job at a 
reasonable program cost. When Joan 
Davis outgrew the program they kept her 
co-star Jack Haley and built Eve Arden. 
This season, as previously noted, Haley 
has been replaced by Jack Carson with 



Arden continuing with the program. By 
keeping one of the two stars at all times 
Sealtest has been able to achieve a con- 
tinuity of effort. In the summer one of 
the stars takes a hiatus so the cost of the 
program is cut down to summer-audience 
size and Sealtest selling runs merrily 
along. Sealtest has local cut'ins on the 
Villafie Store program for local brand 
names throughout the country for as 
National Dair> has abs(jrbed local brands 
it has not eliminated the local brand name 
but simply added the Sealtest label to the 
local package. 

In August 1941 Kraft added a second 
program to its air advertising, taking the 
Gildersleeve character from Fibber McGee 
and Molly to build a program of its own. 




FOR KIDULTS 



FOR CHRISTMAS! 



)> 



^ 






i 







The KOR.\LITES With Their Famous Choral 
Speaking — Famous Impersonations of: 

KAY KYSER as "The Pied Piper" uho jound Hamelin a real 
rati "Boomlown". 

U . C. FIELDS as "King Midas" and BABY SNOOKS as the 

little girl he tamed to gold. 

CINDERELLA, HANSEL AND GRETEL, et al— 

They're all in this series of 
60 quarier-hour episodes. 
Transcribed and dramatized 
trom age old fables — 
^ Yet as new and bright 

^ as the NEW YEAR coming! 



For an audition disc 
and success stories. WRITE 



19 EAST 53r(J STREET.. .NtWYORK CiTY 



With the exception of summer hiatus 
periods Gildersleeve has continued on the 
air selling Parkay Margarine and Kraft 
cheeses. 

National Dairy spends over $2,500,000 
for radio advertising as against around 
$500,000 for magazines. Its success with 
its three programs, however, does not 
deter its member companies from broad- 
casting their own programs. Sheffield's 
inexpensive Guess W/io (WOR, New 
York) filled the Madison Square Garden 
for one broadcast and played Loew's 
State — with plenty of commercial billing 
for the name Sheffield. 

As National Dairy's use of the air has 
been stable, Borden's has been just as 
erratic. Borden nationally has sponsored 
ever>thing from Magic Recipes to its 
present Mark Wamow and County Fair. 
Its gamut has included: 



Household Institute 


;NBC 


1932 


Magic Moments 


Blue 


1933 


Leo Reisman Orch 


NBC 


1933 


Magic Recipes 


CBS 


1934-35 


45 Minutes in 






Hollywood 


CBS 


1934 


Bea Lillie 


Blue 


1935 


Hughes Reel 


NBC 


1938 


Fannie Hurst 


Blue 


1944 


Ed W>nn 


ABC 


1944-45 


Borden Show 


ABC 


1945 


County Fair 


CBS 


1945 (to date) 


Jerry Wa>T)e 


CBS 


1945 


Ginny Simms 


CBS 


1945-47 


Tomm\ Riggs 


CBS 


1946 


Arthurs Place 


CBS 


1947 


Mark Wamow 


CBS 


1947 (to date) 



Of these only County Fair may be said 
to be an outstanding success. It's a day- 
time People Are Funny ■■ Truth or ConsC' 
quences sort of program, inexpensive, with 
a fair Hooper (current 5.3) that usually 
ranges midseason from 6 to 7. That's 
good for a daytimer that's on only once 
a week. 

Although Borden has been unable, ex- 
cept in the case of County Fair, to hit a 
program that delivered a habit of listen- 
ing, ever>' one of their programs has had 
some listening and has therefore sold 
Borden products. They admit that they 
don't know exactly what will sell milk and 
dairy products but they also point out 
that the> 've been in broadcasting for a 
long time and the compan\ has con- 
stantK' grown in gross business and 
profits. Unlike National Dairy they have 
a national trade name, Borden, that goes 
on ever\thing the\ sell from their instant 
coffee to their Eagle Brand Condensed 
Milk. 

Also unlike National Dairy, Borden 
owns its own outlets and distributors. 



56 



SPONSOR 



National, for its part, is making a con- 
certed drive to get men to go into business 
as Sealtest Milk distributors. They use 
the fact that they're radio-sold and are 
continuing to sell the Sealtest trade-mark 
as a plus in this effort. They're out to 
add 1000 of these new outlets in 1947 and 
have developed a distributor package ad- 
justable to nearly any cash reserve for 
setting one's self up in business. It's a 
franchise arrangement which protects the 
new businessman and is very inviting for 
a man with a family — for whom the dairy 
business is painted as something extra 
special. 

Since the World's Fair in New York 
Borden has increasingly sold a new 
Borden trade-mark, Elsie, the Cow, on 
and off the air. Currently they are run- 
ning a contest to name Elsie's new calf. 
At the same time they've discovered that 
a living trade-mark like Elsie has by- 
products in the form of Elsie toys and 
Borden now has a special division called 
Elsie Enterprises which licenses the use 
of the Elsie name, etc. There are toys, 
baby dishes, games, and a whole roomful 
of juvenile products that bear the name 
and likeness of Elsie . . . and they're selling 
as well as advertising Borden. 

Thus, the dairy industry's use of radio 
runs the gamut. The products and 
appeals vary, which gives the man with 
still another slant on capturing the dairy 
audience a basis for arguing his case. 
But the failures have been too many and 
it's time for dairy sponsors to make a 
careful analysis of what clicks. Much of 
the record is here. 



THE OHIO STORY 

{Continued from page 24) 

next problem was to find a narrator to 
carry the major burden of tale-telling. ' 
Here again the need was for a performer 
who, like the producer, would be willing 
to leave lusher markets for his talents to 
come to Cleveland, to forsake the flesh- 
pots, so to speak, for the sylvan beauty of 
one of the Cleveland suburbs. The 
agency found one such in Bob Waldrop, 
who after starting in radio 16 years ago in 
San Francisco had traveled around the 
country during the war narrating the 
Army War Show and later had done the 
Treasury Salute. Although not an 
Ohioan, Waldrop has on a number of 
public occasions frankly admitted that 
he's on the way to becoming one. He 
didn't come to Cleveland to take over 
The Ohio Story job without a number of 
misgivings— but he came and he's very 
happy that he did — now. 

(Please turn to page 72) 
NOVEMBER 1947 



BMI T^-'^S'Ue' 



Hit Tunes for November 

(On Records) 

A GIRL THAT I REMEMBER bmo 

Tex Beneke— Vic. 20-S497 . Victor Lombardo— Maj. 7S69 . Tommy Tuck.i— Col.' 

AS SWEET AS YOU ^eSenO 

Art Lund— MGM 10072 



(Peer') 



(Marks) 



COME TO THE MARDI GRAS 

Xavicr Cugat-Col. 37556 . Freddy Martir,-Vic. 20-2288 
Victor Lombardo— Mai. 7243 . Fernando Alvares—Stg. 1 5145 
Guy Lombardo — Dec. 241 56 

FORGIVING YOU Me - 

HarryJames— Col. 37588 . Johnny Johnston— MGM 1 0076 
Sammy Kaye— Vic. 20-2434 . Jerry Cooper— Diamond 2084 

HILLS OF COLORADO ° '° > 

GuyLombardo— Dec. 24179 . Robert Scott— Mercury 3069 

I WONDER WHO'S KISSING HER NOW 

Perry Como-Vic. 20-231 5 . Ted Weems-Perry Conno-Dec, 25078 
Ray Noble— Col. 37544 . Dinning Sisters--Cap. 433 

^F^k^Fre^br-^STc^^^B^ob^y^D^y^^^^^^^^ 

^:;sr:il'^^;;;^^?i^w i^rT;^;;?^?^ |one 5132 

Danny Kaye— Dec. 24110 . Jerry Cooper— Diarnond 2082 

JeaVsablon-Vic. 25-0101 . Ben Yost Singers-Sonora 1084 

JUST AN OLD LOVE OF MINE ca.pbeiPose) 

f::.^t^:^t:;^^^:^^^<^^^lrC::=^^l'^- Oons Day-Col. 37821 

MADE FOR EACH OTHER - 

Buddy Clark-Xavier Cugat-Col. 37939 . Monica Lewis-Sig. 1 5105 
Dick Farney-Mai. ^^^l-^-^^^^Z^^X.^T' 

SMOKE! SMOKE! SMOKE! (That Cigarette) 

Tex Williams-Cap. 40001 . Phil Harris-Vic. 20-2370 

!Lrnr» Welk— Dec 24113 . Deuce Spriggins— Coast 263 
JoT,;ny"oTd-Col. 37I3I . 101 Ranch Boys-Security 1001 

THERE'LL BE SOME CHANGES MADE Mar ) 

r^ u CI. —r^l ^7963 Peggy Lee— Cap. 1 5001 . Ted Weems— Dec. 25288 
^"dle lond^-ie"l'804i .^Va^s Waller-Vic. 20-2216 

THE STORY OF SORRENTO ^ ° 

Buddy Clark-Xavier Cugal-Col. 37507 . Bobby Doyle-Sig. 1 5079 

ZU-BI (Repubhc) 



(American) 



c.™m„ K««e— Vic 20-2420 . Victor Lombardo— Maj. 7263 
S'y TtckT^Col.* . Art Mooney-MGM' 



* .S"o«ri /" he relrused 



BROADCAST MUSIC INC. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE • NEW YORK 1 9, N. Y. 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



57 



signed and nnsigned 



Adoe/iiUi^u^ Ac^enC'tf, PeMj(UUiei Qlui^iK^ 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



CharU-s ( :. Msiip 
Francis C. Uarfon Jr. 
Mort Bassi-tt 
John Haxier 
K. (). lUllinfisley 
Ik-lin Black 

I. Howard Black Jr. 
/.fplia Sanioiloff Boftert 
lip 1*. Boll Jr. 
(icorili' II. Hover 
RiihiTi II. Brinkerhoff 
Watson Bui'hier 
Walter Hunker 

Kay Cormier 
I" rank Delano 
l-.rnst I >el bridge 
Steve Earle 
Marian Fave 
Theodore V.. Fisher 
.Samuel <'.. Fuller 
Charles (Gabriel 
James .\. (Jarfield II 
Chet (;ierlach 
Harold (Jickman 
.Stanley R. C;raham 
Kthel Greenfield 
Leonard (Jross 
.\rthur (;. Halfpenny 

i honias \V. Hall 
Mason I,. Ham 
F. R. Henderson 
John C;. Holme 

R. E. Jacobson 
l.leu Jones 
.\rthur .\. Judson 
John <:. Kenaston 
Wray I). Kennedy 
Robert Koenift 
\nthonv I.aSala 
William I,, l.edwith 
(;eor)le J. Leroy 
Joseph C. Lieb 

Byrnes MacDonald 
Herbert B. Mankoff 
Robert J. Mann 
John R. Markev 
H. .\. McCoy 
Klinor (i. Mc\ ick ar 
Kdward Merrill Jr. 
Ilenrv K. Mever 
Jan II. II. Meyer 
David II. Murray 
Samuel H. Northcrosa 
Frank .\. Oberndorfer 
Claience T. Peacock 
Kdyihe Polster 
Trudy Rich mond 
Carl k. Roilees 
I.ouis Rosenthal 
Ben Rubin 
I'aul Russell 
Marc II. .Seixa.s 
\lfred K. Sieftel 
l.ynne .Smith 
\udrey Stern 
I. eon 'i'hamer 

II. B. Trout man 
Lester Vail 

(.retchen \andivert 

\. S. White 
Charles S. Wilkinson 
I rank .\. Wood 



1 SO\ EMhER I94T 



Packard-Bell Radio Mfft Co. L. \.. adv mftr 

F'ederal, N. Y.. radio dir 

Morse Intl. N. Y., timebuyer, asst radio dir 

BBD&O. N. Y.. copy supcrv 

Tracy. Locke. Dallas 

Walter Suertfafier. N. Y.. media dir 

W. Farl Bothwell. Pittsburgh, media dir 

Beaumont *: Hohman. L. .\., acct exec 

Bote Little Rock, head 

Cory Snow. Boston 

N. W. .\yer. N'. y. 

Western. L. A. 

Younft & Rubicam. H'wood. prodn supervisor 

.Mlied. L. A., acct exec 

Younft & Rubicam. N. Y.. acct exec 

Mercury PuhlishinC Co. N. Y.. adv dir 
Rodijers & .Smith, H'wood 
Pedlar & Ryan. N. Y., media dir 
•Sherman & Marquette. H'w<iod. radio head 
Brisacher. Van Norden, N. Y.. mftr 
Cleveland News 

f:ory Snow. Boston, copy dir 

Kenyon & Kckhardt. N. Y. 

N'B<: Radio Inst. H'w<M>d 

Business Week. N. Y., sis prom mftr 

N'ortham Warren (lorp. Stamford, Conn., asst to 

fien mftr 
Mercready & Co, Newark, vp 
Doremus. N. Y.. head ften adv div 
Huff & Henderson. Dallas, partner 
Libby McNeill & Libby. Chi., prod adv mfir 

Buchanan, L. A., comml div mi^r 

L. E. McGivena, N. Y., ofc mgr, acct exec 

J. Walter Thompson, N. Y., asst acct exec 
Brown & Biftelow, Denver 

Gever. Newell & Ganfter. N. Y., traffic, prodn mgr 
Curtis Publft Co. Phlla. 
Humbert & Jones. N. Y. 

Kastor, Farrell, Chesley & Clifford, N. Y.. acct 
exec 

Sinclair Refininft <-o. N. Y., exec asst to pres 

F"urniture World. N. Y. 
Ruthrauff & Ryan. N. Y.. radio copy dir 
Crosse & Blackwell Co. Vancouver 
Walker & Downinft. Pittsburgh 
Dorothy Gray Ltd, N. Y.. adv dir 

NBC. N. Y. 

J. M. Mathes. N. Y.. acct exec 

Benton it Bowles, copy writer 

Younft & Rubicam. N. Y.. radio research unit head 

M<;M Records. N. Y.. sis prom mftr 

Ziff-Davis Publft Co. Chi. 

J. M. Ilickerson, N. Y.. creative staff 

ABC. N. Y. 

John F. Jelke Co. Chi. 

Fashi<in Trades, N. Y. 

Craift E. Dennison. Chi., acct exec 

BBD&O. S. ¥.. media dir 

Owen & Chappell, N. Y.. media dir 

Sterling. N. Y., acct exec 

Grant. N. Y. 

J. Waller I'hompson. L. \. 

W. Earl Bothwell. N. \ .. acct exec 

Younft & Rubicam. N. Y.. producei 

San Jose (Calif.) Mercury-Herald and News, asst 

prom mftr 
McCann-Erickson. L. ,\. 

Charles L. Rumrill. Rochester, N. Y., acct exec 
R. W. Webster, L. A., media dir 



Buchanan. L. .\.. acct exec 

Same, vp 

John Blair. N. Y.. sta svc mftr 

LaRoche & Ellis. N. Y.. same 

Wetmore .\dvertisinft. I>allas (new branch), mftr 

Redfield-Johnstone. N. Y.. media dir 

.Same, also vp. ften mftr 

Edward S. Kelloftft. L. A., acct exec 

Leo P. Bott Jr. Adv (new). Chi., head 

Tippett. Jackson & Nolan. Boston, acct exec 

Younft & Rubicam. N. Y.. acct exec 

William Kester. IPwrnKl. copy chief 

.Same, radio mftr 

Hunter. L. .\.. same 

Foote, C.nne & Belding, N. Y.. acct exec 

Bishop. L. .\.. copy chief 

H. K. 1... L. A., acct exec 

Irwin-McHufth. H'wood. copy chief, acct exec 

.Same, vp 

Younft & Rubicam. H'wood. dept exec 

.Same, vp 

Fran Murray, Cleve.. acct exec 

Ouane Jones. N. Y.. dir in radio dept 

.Arnold. Boston, acct exec 

Reinftold. Boston, copy chief 

H. K. L.. L. A., radio head 

Fred Wittner. N. Y.. exec staff 

.Same, ften adv mftr 

O. S. Tyson. N. Y'.. acct exec 
Saine. vp 

E. R. Henderson & .\s.soc8 (new). Dallas, head 
Franklin Baker Div Cieneral Foods Corp. Hoboken. N. J, 

adv merch mftr 
Same. Southern Calif, mftr 
BBD&O. S. F.. media dir 
Seidel. N. Y., vp 
Bishop. L. K.. acct exec 
.\. W. Lewin. N. Y.. acct exec 
Raymond Keane, Denver, acct exec 
.Same, acct exec 
Walter Weir, N. Y.. exec staff 
■M Paul Lefton. N. Y.. acct exec 
.Same, vp 

Same, asst pub rel, adv dir 
Kurk & Brown. N. Y.. acct exec 
CB.S. N. Y.. comml proft development dir 
Stewart -Lovick & Macpherson. \ancouver 
James .\. .Stewart. Carneftie. Pa., acct exec 
Harriet Hubbard .\yer. N. \ .. adv. merch. prom dir 
■S'ounft & Rubicam. H'wood. proft dept exec 
Raym<ind E. Nelson. N. Y.. acct exec- 
Same, vp 

Wm. B. Reminftton. .Springfield. Mass.. acct exec 
.\udieiice Research. N. Y.. vp in chfte radio research 
Zenith Radio (;orp. N. Y.. adv. sis prom mftr 
Mike (;oldftar. N. Y.. acct exec 
Slans & Maury. N. Y.. acct exec 
.\rnold. Boston, fashion, radio acct exec 
Fred W. .\mend Co. Chi., adv mftr 
Lancaster. N. Y.. acct exec 
Jones F'rankel. Chi., acct exec 
.Same, acct exec 
.Same, vp 

Royal Nletal Mfft Co. Chi., adv mftr 
llufto .Scheibner. L. \.. acct exec 
Republic. N. Y.. copy dir. fashion head 
Hixson-O'Donneli. L. \.. acct exec 
Same. Piltsburfth. creative head 
Show Prodns. Dancer- Fit/fterald -.Sample N. Y.. gen supcrv. 

daytime radio 
I'nion ice C;o. S. ¥.. adv mftr 

^'ofttte-Privett. L. \.. vp in chfte creative "ctivity 
Rogers & Porter. Rochester, acct exec 
W. B. Scott. L<mg Beach, adv mgr 





PETfY 

DETROIT 

HARRY WISMER 
Aal. »o the Pret. 



NOVEMBER 1947 



59 



FORJOE 


METROPOLITAN 


MARKET 


STATIONS 


WKAP 


Allentown 


KVET 


Austin 


WORL 


Boston 


WFAK 


Charleston, S. C. 


WTIP 


Charleston, W. Va. 


WSBC 


Cliicago 


WJBK 


Detroit 


KNUZ 


Houston 


KWKW 


Los Angeles 


WNEX 


Macon 


WHHM 


Memphis 


KARV 


Mesa -Phoenix 


WMLD 


Milwaukee 


WMIN 


Minn. -St. Paul 


WBNX 


New York 


WLOW 


Norfolk 


WDAS 


Philadelphia 


WWSW 


Pittsburgh 


WRIB 


Providence 


KXLW 


St. Louis 


KONO 


San Antonio 


KUSN 


San Diego 


KEEN 


San Jose 


WWDC 


Wash.. D. C. 


WHWL 


Wilkes-Barre 


WTUX 


Wilmington 


r 


or/or Offices 


New York • 


Chicago • Philadelphia 


Pittsburgh • 


Washington* Baldmore 


Los Angeles • San Francisco 



THE CHILDREN S HOUR 

(j)ntiniicd from page 32) 

tmich that they smothered in their own 
SlcnyrnM. These remaining programs and 
their current television counterparts like 
WABD's Simll Fry Club with Brother Boh 
[imery, treat the listeners and viewers as 
small grown-ups. In television the kiddie 
hour has moved down to 7 7:30 p.m. 
This isn't because children stay up later 
than they formerly did -these visual 
junior sessions are on the air later at 
night than their radio counterparts be- 
cause at present television stations aren't 
telecasting at the 5 to 6 p.m. moppet time. 

For the past few years adventure series, 
comic strips come to life, and modern 
Horatio Alger tales have pre-empted the 
twilight hour. These have been spon- 
sored by cereals (Quaker Oats, Kellogg's 
Corn Flakes, Ralston), by bakers (Ward 
Baking), by drinks (Ovaltine), and by 
other foods with special attractions for [ 
juveniles, like Peter Pan Peanut Butter. 
(Ward Baking is dropping its sponsorship 
of Tennessee Jed at the end of its current 
cycle not only because of grain shortages 
and high prices but also because there is a 
growing feeling among sponsors that 
unless a children's program reaches the 
mothers at the same time as the young- 
sters advertising doesn't pay off. Jed 
hasn't been reaching them. If on the 
other hand the program reaches the kids 
and the parents listen in, surreptitiously 
or not, then it's a top-drawer commercial 
airing.) 

The comic strip programs based upon 
characters of the same name, like Super' 
man, Dick Tracy, Terry and the Pirates. 
in the daily press, have supposedly had 
Juvenile-adult appeal. Newspaper sur- 
veys have always placed comic strips high 
among the features with extensive reader- 
ship. The adult appeal of comic strip 
radio programs is proved by audience 
composition figures (listeners-per-listen- 
ing-set). Typical audience composition 
figures show: 



Program Men 

"Superman" 0.4(i 

"Captain Midnifthi" 0.47 

"Tom Mix" O.4.? 



Women Children 
0.70 1. 19 

0..S8 1.09 

0.67 l.O.S 



In nearly all cases, it may be noted, 
adult listening (men and women com- 
bined) equals the number of half-pints 
who lend an ear. Superman frequently 
has the highest percentage of women 
listening to a juvenile program and it's 
also noted that Superman generally has a 
very high percentage of children per 
listening set. 

Naturall>', audience composition fig- 
ures are not available for the new half- 



FOR THE FOURTH 
STRAIGHT YEAR! 

KMLB 



^ MONROE 
LOUISIANA 



It 



Has more listeners 
in Monroe and North- 
eastern Louisiana than 
ALL OTHER STATIONS 
COMBINED! 




1947 CONLAN SURVEY 









OisfribwHon (rf kctVMng k 



KMLB 



S»OtH>n A 



ii'K 



JS J*-. 



24es 



and reaches a 
$103,629,000 buy- 
ing power! 

For the fourth itralght year, authenti- 
cated listening surveys conclusively 
prove thot KMLB has more listeners in 
Monroe ond Northeostern Louisiana 
THAN ALL OTHER STATIONS COMBINED! 
In foct, KMLB is the ONLY radio facility 
cleorly heard in this rich orea! 
REPRESENTED BY 

TAYLOR-HOWE-SNOWDEN 




iff\aJ/(} Sales, 



INC. 



AFFILIATED WITH 

AMERICAN BROADCASTING CO. 
J. C. LINER, Jr.. Gen. Mgr. 



60 



SPONSOR 



hour format of Sky King and Jack Arm' 
strong*. Since the General Mills decision 
to try the half'hour adventure program 
idea is said to have been based upon what 
they discovered through their sponsorship 
of the Lone Ranger on a Monday, Wednes- 
day, and Friday basis, the Ranger's aver- 
age audience composition figures should 
give some indication of how Armstrong 
should make out in this division (despite 
the fact that the masked rider is on the 
air from 7:30 to 8 p.m.): 



Program 
"Lone Ranger" 



Men 

0.72 



Women C;hildren 
0.83 0.97 



A forgotten factor in children's hour 
programing is that the audience is never 
constant. Youngsters are constantly 
growing in and out of the age group that 
istens between 5 and 6 p.m. Obviously 
then the over-all listening habit isn't as 
fixed as adult listening habits are. It's 
possible therefore to establish a new set 
of kid habits more easily than with 
adults, at least with some of the young- 
sters. The hitch is that a child with a 
fixation, and habits are forms of fixations, 
is even more set than an adult. He wants 
what he wants when he wants it. When 
he's off something — ouch. 

For years children's programs were sold 
to advertisers on the basis that what 
Johnny and Sis wanted Mom would go 
out and buy. Now they are sold on the 
basis that parents listen to what their 
offspring want to hear. Thus although 
commercials apparently are aimed at 
youngsters they're really talking to the 
adults over the younger generation's 
shoulders. 

Neither of the networks aiming at 
youngsters (ABC and MBS) is 100 per 
cent happy with its children's hour. 
Sponsors are selling at this period at an 
advertising cost which justifies their con- 
tinuing use of the hour. Nevertheless top 
advertising thinking is that the 15- 
minute daytime adventure strip has 
passed its zenith and like the Uncles and 
Aunts of a decade ago they too will pass 
from the commercial scene. 

General Mills (and Derby Foods too) 
may be an advance guard in setting a new 
pattern — or maybe the hour will be 
turned over to the American housewife, 
like it is on NBC and a host of independ- 
ent stations all over the nation. 

It's definitely in a state of flux. 

' They are released by Hooper (the only source) once 
every three months. 



Sticks to his folk music, which he can do 
almost indefinitely, and forgoes guest 
stars (he has had them recently) his pro- 
gram can go its merry way. Ives just 
doesn't need any accompaniment; he can 
sound his own A. Morton Downey will 
have to return to doing his broadcasts 
live. 

Transcription networks like Mickey 
Sillerman's Keystone will just have to 
forget music. Keystone has been placing 
a number of transcriptions of the Sing 
Crosby program on its rural market sta- 
tions and that lush business will be lost. 
The net will have to keep to non-music 
programs or make certain that all Key- 



stone stations have the same musical e.t. 
library. (In the latter case they can key 
in numbers from the library.) 

There are a number of men in the re- 
cording field who say that Petrillo can't 
simply wipe out the music recording busi- 
ness. Others say that if men — even 
members of the AFM — are forced by 
law to work, that's the end of the present 
concept of democracy. 

Musical recording or not, the transcrip- 
tion business has had a jolt but it is pre- 
dicted that there'll be more recorded 
programs on the air commercially in 1948 
than ever before in the history of radio 




TRANSCRIPTIONS 

(Continued from page 31) 

on the air. Petrillo made that clear in 
his ban statement. As long as Burl Ives 



GIVES YOU PRIMARY COVERAGE 
OF A BILLION DOLLAR MARKET 



Retail sales in the primary coverage area of 
\^SBT totalled §1,009,269,000* in 1946! The rich 
counties of northern Indiana and southern Michi- 
gan which comprise this billion-dollar market 
have a combined population of 1,300,500*. And 
there are 414,700 radio homes in this area 
(BMB report). Reniember — this is all primary^ 
coverage! WSBT secondary coverage blankets 
two-thirds of Indiana, stretches well up into 
Michigan, and extends into Illinois and Ohio. 

* Sales Management's Survey of Buying Power 




5000 WATTS 
960 KC • CBS 



PAUL 



RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



NOVEMBER 1947 



61 



GIVOT 

"THE AMBASSADOR 
OF GOOD WILL' 




LOOKING FOR SOMETHING 

NEW IN RADIO SHOWS ? 

HERE IS A SHOW THAT 

IS NEW AND DIFFERENT ! 

A OUARTER-HOUR OF LAUGHS. 
SONGS AND GOOD Will 



fcoturing the 



litablc ilylc of 



George Givot 



fIFTY-TWO OPEN-END OUARTER-HOUR 
TRANSCRIBED PROGRAMS 



C. BRUCE hNOX 

Radio Productions 

FAMMONT HOm - ATOP NOB HIU 

SAN FRANCISCO 6 CAUFORNIA 

VUken 6^34 




KDKA charts its BMB coverage. Going 
tar bt'>()nd the usual station maps the 
pioneer Pittsburgh Westinghouse broad- 
caster has designed a colorful graph which 
shows intensity of its listening in every 
county in its great service area. In mul- 
tiple colors it also shows the penetration 
of the other important transmitters in 
the Steel City. At a glance the timebuyer 
knows just where KDKA stands in any 
county for which he wants figures. 

Popular mailman contest builds audience 
for WPAT which previously had tested a 
policeman Adonis competition. The men- 
in-grey sweepstakes was on a sponsored 
radio program but that didn't stop 42,000 
of the 250,000 men and women and 350 
mail men in the Paterson, New Jersey, 
station's area from rooting for their favor- 
ites. 

WKRC honors the "Grocer oF the Month" 

and the "Druggist of the Month" too. 
Each will rate a broadcast monthly and 
will be selected through ballots printed in 
WKRC's house organ Key Notes. Key 
Notes also will carry a feature story on 
each of the men each month. The idea is 
to build retailer good-will for the Cincin- 
nati station and its sponsors. 

WHBC helps visitins fireman. Collecting upon 
the fact that many of its listeners from 
time to time visit New York, Chicago, 
and Hollywood, station WHBC is issuing 
"Guest Courtesy Cards." These intro- 
duce residents of Canton, Ohio, to the 
guest relation men at network head- 
quarters in those broadcast-center cities 
and facilitate their obtaining tickets to 
see broadcast programs, it's a good- 
will builder plus. 

WISN-Pharmaceutical Association window 
display plan expands. Indicating what they 
think of WISN's Know Your Druggist 
Better program, 25 strategically-located 
Milwaukee drug stores feature in their 
windows a three-panel display promoting 
the drug program in the center and two 
other WISN programs on the sides. The 
display also has a top panel which high- 
lights CBS" slogan "The Biggest Show 
in Town." 

"What's the Weather" a.m. program tops in 
Bismarck, N. D. Although its four years 
old. KF^R's What's the Weather con- 
tinues to pull from 300 to 500 entries 
daily. The first prize is just $5.00 but 



everyone's a weather forecaster so he 
plays the game. Program rating is 15.3 
at 7:45 a.m. Entries predict the weather 
one week in advance. 

Ten-city lour gets 633 inches of publicity. 
In order to get a local slant, the Oklahoma 
Front Page, Phillips Petroleum daily 
newscast over WKY, Oklahoma City, 
visited 10 cities and broadcast in each 
from the newsroom of the local news- 
paper. The result was first page stories 
for the program, good-will on the part of 
the local Phillips gas station opjerators, 
and an increased audience for the pro- 
gram. The operation was carefully 
planned by Bruce Palmer, director of the 
station's news department, and Gene 
White, the outlet's publicity director. 

ESSO ties up with Freedom Train. More than 
50 timely radio reminders will be used 
on local Esso Reporter broadcasts as the 
Freedom Train travels the country. 

Please turn to page 64) 



ADAMS CLOVE AND BEEMANS GUM 


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at a popular concert, performed 


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Radio Productions and Jinqles 


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1 BSOMadison Ave.,N.y.28,N.y. 


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:OCILANA COUGH NIPS • MOUNDS 


1 • 



62 



SPONSOR 



say 




Send sift subscriptions to SPONSOR this Christmas 
and, in effect, you're saying: 

"Here are the trends, the interpretations, the 
experiences of broadcast advertising from the 
buyers' viewpoint. . . . Here are the double- 
checked, tested facts proving that properly used, 

BROADCAST ADVERTISING PAYS Here 

is enjoyment. For SPONSOR with its easy- 
flowing, pictorial format and meaningful stories 
is fun to read." 

With each gift subscription you say, "MERRY 
CHRISTMAS." For each recipient will receive a 
specially designed gift card bearing your name. 



SPECIAL CHRISTMAS GIFT RATES 

(based on one-year subscription) 



1 

2-4 
5-14 
15-24 
25 &'more 



$5.00 each 
$4.50 each 
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Your own subscription (new, renewal, extension) may be included. 

*(add $.50 for each_ Canadian subscription) 



Use enclosed 

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/ 



Your Hartford 
County Station 




WKNB 



^^i^-^// L 



Regional Coverage 
of the rich, central 
Connecticut market 
at local rates/ 
High Hooper Rating 

840KC— 1000 Watts 
WKNB-FM— 95.1 Megacycles 

Represented by Adam Youns, Jr., Inc. 

The New Britain Broadcasting Co. 

S1 3 Main St., New Britain, Conn. 

1 1 Asylum St , Hartford, Conn. 



BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 

{Cjuntinued from pa^e 62) 
Special copy "sells" freedom vs. "isms" 
and invites listeners to visit the train. 
Esso's cooperation is at the request of the 
Advertising Q)uncil which is clearing 
time for the "liberty selling" promotion. 
WFIL presents Scout awards monthly. Gen- 
eral Manager Roger W. Clipp, as a pub- 
lic service gesture, will present a monthly 
"Boy Scout Award for Service" starting 
last month (October) and an annual 
award starting in February 1948. The 
idea is to advance scouting but at the 
same time it's certain to make Philadel- 
phia sco uts tune in WFIL regularly. j^ _ 
Housing instead of ' hoop-la^ for WNBC 
25th Anniversary. Stressing service, Jim 
{Please turn to page 75) 



LISTENING, FALL 1947 
(Continued from page 27) 
with the exception of Jack Benny, none of 
the Sabbath faithfuls have hit their regu- 
lar season opening pace. Benny started 
off on the first Sunday in October within 
one-tenth of a point of his 1946 rating, 
'47 18.6 against '46 18.7. The rest of the 
comedy block-program sequence didn't 
really get started during this week. Fitch 
Bandwagon was off .7 of a point, Edgar 
Bergen was off 6.3, Fred Allen 8.7. Even 



PROJECT YOUR SALES STORY TO 
OHIO'S RICHEST FARM MARKET 

WITH 5,000 WATTS / 
DAY AND NIQHT / 
HERE'S WHBC'S / 



t«RGED 



RURAL PICTURE 



/ YOUR DOLLAR BUYS MORE THAN BEFORE 

/ in Ohio's most di\ crsitit'tl iiidustri.tl protluciion 
/ .irc.i .ind richest rur.il region. 

BASIC MUTUAL Plus ABC Fealures • Basic ABC Full Schedule 3-1-41 



CANTON, OHIO 

Tht Itst lalonctd Marktt in Hit Unittd Statts 



the 9 to 10 hour of music was off, as indi- 
cated previously-, and as indicated previ- 
ously it took the quiz show Take It or 
Leave It, which has moved from CBS to 
NBC, to do a better job for its broadcast 
period than the 1946 program which held 
down the slot. 

With the start of the broadcast season 
the relative standing of stations in many 
cities has resumed a near-normal status. 
WLW, NBC outlet in Cincinnati, one of 
the nation's most promotion-minded out- 
lets, has returned to first place in the 
Queen City. In many cases the baseball- 
programed stations haven't slipped back 
to where they were before the summer. 
That's because with night baseball and 
the increased nationwide interest in the 
game more people heard the broadcasts 
and at the same time sampled inde- 
pendent station programing than ever 
before in the histor>' of broadcasting. 

How much promotion meant to Bing 
Crosb)' was seen as he started off this 
season (there was about half as much 
push on the program in 1947 as in 1946). 
Instead of the 24 with which Bing bowed 
onto the ABC web in 1946, he bowed in 
with a 15.5 this season. Although in '46 
Bing really sounded (due to faulty disk- 
ing) like the Groaner which he has in the 
past titled himself, and in 1947 he really 
sounds like the personality boy, this 
didn't save him, on his initial airing at 
least, from a rating 8.4 Hooper points 
lower than last year. Henry Morgan, 
who follows Crosby slipped 2.4, from 
ll.l to 8.7. 

Drew Pearson's (Lee Hats) shift to 6 
p.m. from last season's 7 p.m. is paying 
off. On October 6, 1946, he rated 5.3. 
This >ear, on October 5, he rated 9. 

A number of programs stayed on all 
through the summer and should have 
shown up better than they had in the 
past against competition. Some, like 
Sam Spade, did show the results of the 
52-week habit of listening. Spade had a 
6.4 on October 6, 1946, and a 10.8 on 
October 5, 1947. On the other hand Dr. 
Christian, which also stayed on right 
through the year, only rated a 9.3 on 
October 1 while on October 2 last > ear the 
program reached 1 1.5. There are a num- 
ber of reasons for this, aside from fewer 
sets in use. The Fishing and Hunting 
Club with an average of 1.9 was no com- 
petition to the Jean Hersholt program. 
On the other hand. Vox Pop, which has 
replaced the Fishing Club on ABC, is 
strong competition and it reaches the 
same type of listener that Christian 
appeals to. The Vox Pop opening rating 
was 5.9, four points more than the Club 
pulled last \ear. Gildersleeve on NBC 



64 



SPONSOR 



•••*•••• 

A STAR 
MARKET 

0/ the SOUTH 

* The People 

Combined: 1,000,000 
Urban only: 131,000 
Johnson City. .34,000 

Kingsport 33,000 

Bristol 30,000 

Elizdbethton. . .20,000 
Greeneville. . . 8,000 
Erwin 6,000 

* Radio Homes 

WJHL is the only full time 
regional station serving 
this area. Thirty-two BMB 
counties with 85,020 BMB 
radio homes. WJhIL is the 
"most listened to" in ten 
of its 32 BMB counties. 

* Buying Power 

Highest income bracket 
group in South. 
Richest and most thickly 
settled rural communities 
in South. 

* Industry 

Plastics 

Textiles 

Bookbinding 

hiardwood flooring 

Hosiery 

Rayon 

Silkmills 

Furniture 

Foundries 

And many others 

* Agriculture 

Tobacco: 100,000,000 
pounds sold annually 

Beans: World's largest 
market 

Dairy 

Poultry 

Livestock 

* Tourists 

Heart of TVA recreation 
area. Gateway to Great 
Smoky Mountains. 

John E. Pearson Co. — Reps. 



910Kc 



WJHL 



5000 Watts 



Johnson City, Tennessee 
ABC Full Time 

******** 



which competes with Dr. Christian also is 
holding its audience, 14.7 in 1946, 14.7 in 
1947, in the first week in October. Quiet 
Please, the MBS sustaining program 
which is in the 8:30-9:30 p.m. est time 
period along with the other programs 
checked in this paragraph doubled the 
audience that It's Up to Youth, Seventeen 
Magazine's program, garnered in that 
slot last year (3.8 vs 1.8). 

Even the tougher competition doesn't 
explain the Dr. Chri.stian drop. However, 
it is pointed out also that the program 
that precedes it this year is the low-rating 
American Melody Hour which in the 
period studied delivered only a 6.2. Last 
year Campbell Soup's Jack Carson had 
his initial fall 1946 airing on the com- 
parable date, nevertheless he rated 7.8 
and delivered that audience to Dr. 
Christian. Keeping a program on all year 
is audience listening-habit insurance but 
it's also important that the program that 
precedes it deliver a good audience. Com- 
petition also counts, of course. 

Most programs that ran through the 
summer were low-cost programs and are 
expected to suffer as a new season starts 
and some listeners stray to sample new 
wares. None of the top-ranking pro- 
grams stayed on through the humid 
months to test whether or not such a con- 
tinuity of broadcasting would pay fall 
dividends. Eddie Cantor has promised 
next season to work right through the 
year for Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer. How- 
ever, Cantor's opening season publicity is 
always suspect. For the past four years, 
for instance, including this fall, he has an- 
nounced that he would have his cast 
memorize their lines and work in full cos- 
tume in preparation for the coming of 
video. To date he continues to work 
from a script as do all his cast. 

September and October have had real 
summer weather all over the U. S. and 
Canada. It might have been expected 
that program ratings as the shows came 
back to the air would have suffered a 
great deal more than they have. 

It takes a Jolson, however, to change a 
trend — to send ratings bouncing. It takes 
mood programing, block sequences, to 
catch over 20 per cent of the radio re- 
ceivers of the nation — a sequence like 
NBC's Tuesday night comedy round-up. 



Ra rings 
9.4 
10.7 
19.8 
23.0 
23.0 
19.2 



And these are not midseason ratings but 
October 7 when heat waves were sweeping 
the nation. lii^1*-V~l.'^.' 



Uie/ie'6. . . . 



Time 


Program 


8-8:30 


Milton Berle 


8:30-9 


Date with Judy 


9-9:30 


Amos 'n' Andy 


9:30-10 


Fibber McGee and Molly 


10-10:30 


Bob Hope 


10:30-11 


Red Skelton 



Industry 
Farming 



Wealth 

THE RICH 

DOWNSTATE 

ILLINOIS 

MARKET 

and onlt^ . . • 

WMIX 

"Southern Illinois' Most Powerful 
Radio Voice" 

SERVES THAT ENTIRE 
RICH AREA 

940 kc, AM 94. I mc, FM 
No. 2 Radio Center, Mt. Vernon, III. 

Your John E. Pearson man will be slad 

to discuss availibilities and 

rates with yog. 



NOVEMBER 1947 



^. 



65 



No. 3 



m a series. 



tough -minded 
examination 



tTE 



radio values 
siiows tiiat 
CBS is the 
most effective 



networic 
in America, 
today 



All the facts show that CBS delivers audiences at 
less cost than any other network. 

The tough-minded advertiser knows it isn't program 
effectiveness alone that makes the difference. 
It's also the fact that: 

CBS has the "best-balanced'' 
distribution of facilities 
in all networic radio 

CBS has the highest ratio of high-powered stations 
(5,000 watts or more) among all networks. 

CBS has the lowest ratio of low-powered stations 
(250 watts or less) among all networks. 

Combine the superb "balance^' of the powerful and 
mature CBS stations with the unquestioned power 
of CBS programming, and you see why: 

The second-best network is only 96% 
as effective as CBS — and the foitrth-hest 
network is only 66% as eflfective as CBS — 
in delivering actual audiences for each 
advertising dollar expended. 

The facts are summarized in a new study. 

To see this study... 

And to get the utmost in Radio values... 

SEE CBS... 

THE COMPLETE NETWORK 



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D.™j 



2500000^00 



IN RADIO 

STATION WNEW 

NEW YORK. NY. 

FOR 

OVER-ALL PROMOTION 

ToEPENDENTSTATiONS 
5000 WATTS OR OVER 

1947 



«« 



Another first for WNEW - top 

honors for Overall Promotion in 
Billboard's 1947 industry-wide competition! 
This promotion plan sells VC^EW programs and 
personalities to Greater New Yorkers as they ride 
trains, taxis , trolle ys, ferr y boats and busses ; as they 
read their newspapers and ma g azines ; as they go to 
the movies , open their mail or their laundr y! 



i ■! 



That plan delivers two and a half billion listener- 
impressions a ytzT—but it isn't enough. Another first 
for WNEW is the use of the Douglas Leigh "Flying 
Spectacular," which adds the impact of 1 1,500 light 
bulbs. This 340-foot continuous sign flashes WNEW 
promotion in letters 27 feet high! Adding still 
another dimension to the advanced, award-winning 
WNEW promotional approach! 




Serving New York and New Jersey 24 Hours a Day 



ON YOUR 
DIAL 



Represented by John Blair & Co. 

NOVEMBER 1947 



71 




THE OHIO STORY 

liAJiitiniwd Jruui pa^ic !>7j 

Having found the three key figures 
necessary for the program writer, direc- 
tor, and narrator the agency next faced 
the problem of actors. There were no 
radio actors in Cleveland since no dra- 
matic programs had been aired in the city 
since John Royal had left WTAM years 
before to become program head of NBC. 
However, the Cleveland Playhouse and 
other little-theater groups were active in 
the city and although of course non- 
union an agreement was reached with 
AFRA that made a number of actors 
available. Auditions proved that there 
was plenty of radio talent among Cleve- 
land's semi-pros. 

The programs seldom die after one per- 
formance on the air. Schools play them 
back over their loud speaker systems. 
Station WBOE, the Board of Education 
station of Cleveland, uses selected Ohio 
Story programs for in-school training and 
fraternal orders frequently ask for special 
disks of Ohio stories that are close to 
th ir hearts. 

Not alone are the e.t.'s of the program 
used but printed scripts by the hundreds 
go out to school children who individually 
request copies because they enjoy them 
and because of their historical and educa- 



tional value. Thus not only do the 
broadcasts themselves have a direct im- 
pact but the scripts and educational re- 
playing of specific programs build added 
gcx)d-will for the sponsor. 

Aside from the parent company, 
AT&T, the only other telephone company 
on the air now is Michigan Bell. Michi- 
gan does its selling over a group of 16 
intrastate broadcasters using transcrip- 
tions of an entertainment program called 
Number Please and featuring The Song 
Spinners and Eddie Dunn. The reason 
that not more AT&T subsidiaries are on 
the air throughout the U. S. at present is 
explained by the many rate cases which 
are before local public utility boards. 
Although there are a great many facts 
available indicating that NBC's Telephone 
Hour and the nationwide spot campaign 
helped to clear the wires during the war 
for military personnel and essential busi- 
ness, and that broadcasting being, like 
telephoning, oral in nature, can help keep 
up the peak in the long distance telephone 
load, there are still some utility commis- 
sioners who look upon broadcast advertis- 
ing during the extended period of a rate 
hearing as definitely being in questionable 
taste. These utility commissioners ques- 
tion any expense other than operating 

(Please turn to page 74) 



FREE 6- PETERS, Inc., National R»pr«»enl«tivtt 




lowan income rose 27% between 
'45 and 46, the Department of 
Commerce reports. ( Compared 
to a 9% increase for the rest of 
the U.S.A.) 

Iowa farm receipts alone rose 
67% in the first six months 
of '47. 

But more than half of Iowa's 
fabulous income derives from 
industry, and Iowa industry is 
expanding steadily! 

These are just a few of the rea- 
sons why we keep suggesting you 
cash in on the rural and urban 
market out in Eastern Iowa . . . 
with VtMT . . . only CBS outlet 
in the area. 

As/i your Kalz representative. 









WMT 



72 



CtDAK KAMDS 



Th* Station Built By Loyal Litttnvr- 
ship . . . Now in it» 25th Y**r! 



BASK COLUMBIA NtTWOKK 

5000 waUs 600 kilocycles Day & Ni(ht 
Member: Mid-Sl«le» Group 



SPONSOR 



I 
I 



You can reach more listeners on CFRB 



DOLLAR 

FOR 
DOLLAR 



than any other Toronto station! 

Here's what CFRB offers for each advertising dollar 

2,795 potential radio homes after 7 p.m. 
3,475 " " " between 6-7 p.m. 

5,195 " " " at other times 

Yes, more listeners ... a larger audience; more prospects . . . 
a ready-made market! That's the value you get for your 
dollar on CFRB . . . full measure running over. 

Ask the advertisers already using CFRB . . . some of whom 
have been broadcasting over this station for years! They can 
tell you why they sta y with CFRB . . . they can quote figures. 
But the basic fact behind the figures is this . . . you get 
your dollar's worth and more on CFRB . . . you get RESULTS! 

REPRESENTATIVES: 

UNITED STATES 

Adam J. Young Jr. Incorporated 

CANADA 

All-Canada Radio Facilities Limited 

TORONTO 



Looking forward to the next twenty years! 




SELL 



OUT OF 



CITY FOLKS IN THE 



SOUTH'S No. 1 STATE 



WITHIN OUR 



Primary+Area 



• WINSTON-SALEM 

• GREENSBORO 

• HIGH POINT 

2.5 MV/M 

MEASURED 
SIGNAL 



210,200 PERSONS 

$179,469,000 in Retail Sales 
$283,685,000 in Buying Income 

We Lead Day and Night 
in This Big Tri-City Market 

Write for our BMB DATA FOLDER 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM ^ 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 




THE OHIO STORY 

{CorUinnea from page 72) 

ones when a rate increase is asked. There 
have been a great number of rate cases 
during the past year. Increases amount- 
ing to $78,000,000 a year have been 
granted in 24 states. In 17 other states 
increases which ma>' amount to $93,000,- 
000 a year are pending. The remaining 
states are expected to have some applica- 
tions filed within the next six months. 

Many men and women made their first 
toll calls during the war. It is a prob- 
lem to retain that load. The commercials 
in Th: Ohio Story do a clean cut job 
of selling the idea that only the telephone 
can bring distant people together. In a 
typical commercial a boy graduates from 
college. His parents are unable to be 
there. The first thing he does after re- 
ceiving his diploma is to call mom and 
dad and tell them he's graduated — cum 
laude. It's only a minute telephone call 
on the air but it sells the idea of how the 
phone can cut through uncertainty, fear, 
and worry. Each call simulated on a 
broadcast tells its own story on the value 
of long distance calls. 

Stations do an extra bit of promotion 
on the program because they're selling 
their own state when they sell The Ohio 
Story. Good evening time has been 
cleared by outlets due to some extra- 
energetic selling by the McCann-Erickson 
agency and because the program is the 
right kind of commercial public service. 
It also frequently collects extra promotion 
from the corporations whose Ohio roots it 
dramatizes. When it saluted the greeting 
card industry, hundreds of postcards 
went out to stationery stores telling of the 
broadcast. When a program was con- 
ceived around Jack Werst, the Dayton 
purchaser of the Vanderbilt diamond, 
every jeweler around Dayton received a 
circular from station WHIO. Ohio Bell 
itself takes big newspaper advertisements 
to tell local areas of shows that are of 
especial interest to them. 

For any sponsor the moral of The Ohio 
Story is simple- a program can sell the 
listeners of any state despite the fact that 
there's no trained talent in its originating 
city — that live piograming is a lost art in 
that city. It has proved, as far as it's 
possible to prove anjthing in 1 1 months, 
that great corporations can be humanized 
b> broadcasting. And McCann-Erickson 
through its selling The Ohio Story to Ohio 
Bell has proved once again that to an 
advertising agency a well-chosen broad- 
cast program is an ideal new business 
getter — it now represents Ohio Bell. 




5,433,574 Pairs of Ears 
within reach of Philadel- 
phia's Pioneer Voice. 

WIP 

IT'S MUTUAL 



Represented nationally 
by EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES 

The Pacific Coast's Greatest 

Half-Hour Radio Show 

Is Available 



It's the Joe Hernandez Show! 

Currently under Sponsorship in 
Los Angeles by 

Marshall & Clampett 
Plymouth & De Soto 

1 . The Highest Hooper, six 
nights weekly, oi any 
like show in radio! 

2. Biggest mail pullin history 
of local radio, 56,000 
letters in five weeks! 

3. More than 1,000,000 
listeners nightly, of which 
68 '/c are families, home- 
makers, etc. 

The entire Pacific Coast, with the 
exception of the Los Angeles market, 
is immediately available. 



THE JOE HERNANDEZ AGENCY 

954 So. La Brea St. 
Los Angeles 36, Calif. 



74 



SPONSOR 



J 



BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 

(Continued from page 64) 

Gaines, manaoer of NBC's key station in 
New Yori<, broadcast a scries in Septem- 
ber on the housing problem as its mode 
of celebration for being on the air 25 
years. The idea was to stress service in- 
stead of age and it won full columns in 
the metropolitan consumer press. N. B. 
The programs were good too. 

Bubble-biowins contest. WDRC wanted a 
contest show that youngsters would love 
and so came up with a bubble-blowing 
contest. It made a tremendous special 
event and is still the talk of Junior Hart- 
ford, Conn. Prizes were wrist watches, 
one for the champion boy blower and one 
for the girl. 

Sheet music a promotional item. It used to 
be that only big name signers and band 
leaders rated the covers of popular sheet 
music but disk jockeys get there now. 
The most recent to make the first music 
page was Jack the Bellboy at WJBK, 
Detroit. Naturally he's on the tune 
called It's Jack the Bellboy Time by 
Dardanelle and Peter Conn. Dardanelle 
introduced the song on the networks and 
everyone at WJBK has his fingers crossed 
hoping it's hit stuff. 

TV 

{Continued from page 36) 

The same week that information leaked 
out that NBC was planning to put com- 
mercial TV production in the hands of the 
agencies, while at the same time building 
program packages which it'd like to sell 
agencies and sponsors, Charles Moscovics, 
sales manager of WCBS-TV, took a sock 
at advertising agencies for lack of interest, 
poor production, and the hiring of "jerks" 
with motion picture backgrounds instead 
of TV know-how. 

The sock served to remind advertisers 
that the two major networks continue to 
have personalities who disagree. 

* • * 

Paul West, ANA president, who opened 
the first American Television Society 
luncheon on October 22, talked in gener- 
alities but he did remind the lunchers that 
TV has to pay its way at the cash registers 
in the current media battle in which all 
existing advertising facilities are improv- 
ing their productiveness— and also becom- 
ing more expensive. He also reminded 
the society members and guests that it 
had the problem— to sell the American 
way, free enterprise, so that radio, TV, 
and all advertising media would continue 
to be free to carry advertising. 

* * * 

While a number of advertising agencies 
have telecast programs which they offered 

NOVEMBER 1947 



for sponsorship, it has taken Philip Klein 
of Philadelphia and Buchanan & Com- 
pany of Beverly Hills to present programs 
to sell themselves. The Philip Klein 
agency is selling through the device of 
introducing Philadelphia to Philadel- 
phians, over WFIL-TV. Buchanan, 
which has a stake in TV since it's Du- 
Mont's and Paramount's advertising 
agency, is using a video newsreel as its 
selling vehicle. Purpose? To show ad- 
vertisers, says Fred Jordan, agency vp, 
that a creditable program can be aired 
even on a limited budget. 
* * * 

RCA reduced the price of sets (a new 



line) about $50 each during October 
despite the fact that every set produced 
thus far has a buyer waiting for it. One 
of the reasons was the fact that as pro- 
duction speeds up cost per unit goes down 
and part of the saving can be passed on to 
the public. 

* • * 

Thirty-five thousand TV receivers went 
into the hands of the public in October 
and more than that came off the produc- 
tion line. 

The job of maintaining radio's economy 
while building television as an advertising 
medium gets tougher every day. 

Due li> union prablrnix. fr pensive equipment and a 
host of other produefion proljlems. 




When Billboard reviewed 
the Bonus Audience Rat- 
ings for the Top Ten Day- 
time Shows, CBS had five of them — including the first three. /n every one o/ these //ve, 
WTAG was fhe top audience delivering sfatjonl 



WTAG 



WORCESTER 



580 KC 5000 Watts 



C* tM ^^'^^ ^- RAYMER CO. National Sales Represenlalives. 
Affiliated with the Worcester Telegram ^ Gazette. 




I 




f^^ > U'DSU broidcjsis 50()0 wain 

from ihc French Quarter to 

ihc Gulf and South Louijiana hstcncrs. 

From daily asswiation with time-honored 
Sew Orleaiii tinliiutioiii WDSU has 
developed a hi(;h quality of integrity. 
WDSU devotes prognim lime regularly 
and exclusively to the St. Louis Cathedral, 
the International House, Moisant Inter- 
national Airport, Tulanc University, 
Union Station, the Municipal Auditorium, 
nphonies and Operas. 

VX'DSU's dominate Hoop- 
crating proves that hon- 
oring local institutions 
creates high listener 
loyalty. 




WDSU 



NEW 
ORLEANS 

1280 kc 

John Blair & Company, Representative 



ABC 

Affiliate 

sooo 

Wo lit 




Atlantic City^s Ifotrl oj Distinction 

The Ideal Hotel for Rest and 
Relaxation. Beautiful Rooms. 
Salt Water Baths. Glass in- 
closed Sun Porches. Open 
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Favorite liendezwus of the Elite 

Exclusive Pennsylvania Avenue 
and Boardwalk 



[To West 52ndJ 

(Continued from page 6) 

AGAIN "COMPARAGRAPH 

What I like best about your COM- 
PARAGRAPH arc the inclusions of the 
Pacific Coast schedule of either rej^ional 
profjrams or repeats, to show whether a 
projjram can or does go straight through. 
Too bad you haven't space to go one 
step further, to show the way such prO' 
grams as Bing Crosby, or some of the kid 
shows, are regionalized. 

Frank Silvernail 

Charge of Radio Commercials 

BBD&O, New York 



It is difficult for me to criticize the 
comparative program pocket piece which 
I shall always be glad to receive. 

If I have any criticisms, they would be 
from the subject of readability. I think 
that if it were black and white instead of 
color and if your letters were slightly 
larger, it would be -at least for people 
whose eyes are getting old like my own — 
easier to read. 

Instead of criticisms, you actually have 
congratulations forthcoming to you. 
Carlos Franco 
Young & Rubicam, Inc., N. Y. 



The COMPARAGRAPH in the Oc- 
tober SPONSOR is one of the finest things 
that I have seen in a long while. If they 
are available, please send us a half-dozen 
copies of this in order that they may be 
distributed to our salesmen and program 
people. If there are any charges for the 
reprints, please bill us for them. 
J. C. Kellam 
General Manager 
KTBC, Ai(s/in, Texas 



As you know, virtually every network, 
at least at one time or another, has tried 
its hand at a four-network chart. 

Our last one, I seem to recall, ran in 
three colors and folded out to about 
double the size of a standard road map! 

I'd like to tell you, as one who has been 
through the mill, I think your COM- 
PARAGRAPH is one of the most com- 
pact, convenient and all 'round useful 
jobs of its kind that I've ever carried 
around in my pocket. 

Robert A. Schmid 
VP, Station Relations 
MBS, New York 



READER SERVICE 

I wish to thank you for your kind co- 
operation in giving me the background on 
a statement in your article entitled, 
Millions Spent in Agency Fact'Finding. 

I would like to take you up on your 
generous offer to send me the research 
figures which support this statement. It 
is understood, of course, that the figures 
will be presented by you in such a way as 
not to reveal any information which you 
feel is confidential in nature. 
Sykes Scher.man 
Compton Advertising, Inc., N. Y. 



WWDC BLOCK PROGRAMED 

We looked in vain for a mention of 
WWDC in your very excellent and com- 
prehensive article on block programing. 

We failed to find any mention of our 
very famous All Sports Parade which runs 
six days a week from 1 to 5 p.m., and 
which for a period of years has consist- 
ently ranked second or third in this mar- 
ket. It is retaining this leadership today 
even though we have 13 AM stations 
operating in this area. 

Nor did we see our famous 1450 Club 
mentioned, which for two hours each 
night gives many of the network programs 



SPEARHEADING 
THE PROGRESS 





RADIO'S BEST BUY 

IN THE 
NATION'S CAPITAL 




eVEHCTT L.DIUMHO 
S£M. mOH. 



i3i9-F-STnecT, nm 



76 



SPONSOR 



a run for their money. A survey made by 
one of our competitors lists the 1450 Club 
as the number one program in this city 
in popularity, ranking higher than any 
individual network show. 

Nor, for that matter, did we see any- 
thing about Tune Inn, our two-hour disk 
jockey program from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. 
Although recently established, it is fast 
developing enviable ratings. 

Nor did we see any mention of our 
horizontal and vertical block programing 
of sports events. In the summer it is the 
Washington Senators baseball games; in 
the fall, the University of Maryland foot- 
ball games; in the winter, nightly play-by- 
play broadcasts of hockey and basketball 
from Uline Arena at 10 p.m. 

We failed to see any reference to our 
solid block of juvenile programs on Satur- 
day morning from 9 a.m. until noon. 

But then, of course, we could not ex- 
pect one article to cover block programing 
of every individual station in the country. 
We think you did a swell job for the in- 
dustry, particularly the independents, in 
pointing out the value of this type of pro- 
graming to the sponsor. We have known 
the importance of block programing for a 
long while, but strangely enough, the 
national advertiser has only recognized 
its importance somewhat belatedly. 
Ben Strouse 
General Manager 
WWDC, Washington, D. C. 



WMCA IS PEEVED 

Your October issue purports to review 
the question of block programing in 
American radio. Four New York inde- 
pendents are cited as examples. Your 
reporters evidently were blinded by the 
spectacular success of the most block pro- 
gramed of them all — New York's WMCA. 

For several years, WMCA's policy of 
block programing for individual audiences 
has paid off — but well. Mr. and Mrs. 
Music (Bea Wain and Andre Baruch) on 
the air three and a half hours daily across 
the board have increased ratings for those 
hours 89 per cent. The new Tommy 
Dorsey Show, 1 2 hours weekly across the 
board, teed off last month; the show was 
more than 80 per cent sold before broad- 
cast time. At least two more top-named 
personalities will fill in additional strips 
across the board. 

Block programing of afternoon strips 
with children's shows, sans blood and 
thunder, have similarly made a dent in 
the New York audience. Ask the 
hundreds of schools, dozens of libraries 
and, again, the Ohio State Committee 



how they recommend these features. 
Pace-setting WMCA is peeved ! 
Howard Klarman 
Sales Promotion Manager 
WMCA, N. Y. 



On page 45 of the October issue of 
SPONSOR there is a Monthly Tabulation 
of Advertising by Categories, in which the 
programs sponsored by various manufac- 
turers are listed. A brief check disclosed 
a few sins of omission, which we are sure 
you will want to correct. These are as 
follows : 

The Andrew Jergens Company of Cin- 



cinnati sponsors Walter Wincheil on Don 
Lee also, Sunday night 8:30 8:45 p.m. 
(PST) on 43 stations. 

The Kreml Hair Tonic company, R. B. 
Semler, Inc., sponsors Billy Rose — Pitch- 
ing Horseshoes on the Mutual network; 
and Monday through Friday on the Don 
Lee Broadcasting System, 8:55-9:00 p.m. 
(PST) on 45 stations. 

The Wildroot Co., Inc., sponsors 
What's the Name of That Song? on Don 
Lee Wednesday, 8:00-8:30 p.m. (PST) on 
48 stations. 

Robert H. Stock Publicity 
KHJ~Don Lee, Hollywood, CalU. 




Kansas farmers have harvested the largest, most valuable 
wheat crop in all history. Equalling the astronomical amount 
received for it will be the value of their 1947 livestock. Add 
to this more millions from the sale of corn, oats, soy beans, 
etc. Once again, they're the First Families of Agriculture. 

But wealth hasn't changed their careful buying habits. 
They're still guided largely by the friendly recommendations 
of WIBW— the station they've always preferred— always 
depended upon. That's why WIBW is a more-important- 
than-ever sales influence in Kansas and adjoining states. 



Serving th» ' , 

First Families of Agriculture 

Rep.: CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc. 



^P» 

''^W "» 



1% 



:i 



BEN lUOY 

G«n. Mgr. 

WIBW-KCKN 



NOVEMBER 1947 



77 



Sl'fPNSOIt 




SPEAKS 

Once a year 

Thirteen issues ago, in our first issue, 
we stated what sponsor stands for. We 
wanted to set down our credo in words 
everybody would understand. What we 
wrote then we repeat now: 
"The job, as we see it, boils down to this: to 
give the sponsor what he needs to understand 
end effectively use broadcast advertising in 
all its forms — 



"tu sort out the Jour broadcast advertising 

mediums AM, FM, TV, FAX in their 

present'day perspective 

"to make every line oj editorial content vital 

and vivid to the sponsor - 

' ' to look at broadcast issues fairly, firmly, and 

constructively 

"to promote good broadcast advertising — 

advertising that is good for the sponsor and 

good for the listener." 

Again, again and again . . . 

With the formation of the National 
Association of Radio Station Representa- 
tives it had been hoped that emphasis 
would have been placed upon promotion 
of spot broadcast advertising. Unfortu- 
nately intramural issues have beclouded 
the promotional objectives and to a 
degree caused friction within the member- 
ship of the new group. 

No doubt the intramural problems are 
important but they can't be so important 
to the sponsor or the broadcast industry 
as the promotion of radio at its source, 
spot broadcasting. Individually, station 
representatives have made major contri- 
butions to development of radio as a 
broadcast medium. Blair, with his long- 
term advertising on spot; Petry with a 
code of practice which he has persuaded 
most of his stations to accept, and his 



Politz survey on the effectiveness of spot 
broadcasting (second edition out this 
month >; and Katz with his continuing re- 
search studies, especially diaries — these 
are just three who have gone beyond the 
call of duty and plowed back some of the 
profits of their operations into selling 
broadcasting to sponsors. 

That it hasn't been enough, even the 
hardest workers in the field are prone to 
admit. No representative can do the job 
alone. It needs an industry-wide associa- 
tion or a sfXJt broadcasting group. 

The industry-wide association (NAB) 
has been concerned with problems rather 
than promotion. Therefore with the 
formation of the station representatives 
association sponsor for the first time felt 
that the driving force that was necessary 
had been found. It still feels that this 
is so. 

The association comes into being at an 
appropriate moment. All other media 
are increasing their battle for a larger 
share of the advertising dollar. If radio 
doesn't fight on an industry basis instead 
of as a loosely bound group of individual- 
ists, sponsors are going to believe the 
competitive story — the story that black 
and white and outdoor advertising pro- 
mote. 

Broadcast advertising pays! Proper 
promotion will prove it. 



Applause 



3 



The "Independents'" Code 

The NAB committee of independent stations met October 
23 in Washington to suggest amendments to the proposed 
Standards of Practice. They proved to everyone interested in 
broadcast advertising that they weren't out to open the flood 
gates to bad commercial practices. They emphasized what 
had to be stressed, that all broadcasting is divided into three 
parts — networks, network affiliates, and independent stations. 

They stated that most commercial limitations in the code 
were good. They suggested reductions in commercial time in 
two time brackets and an increase in only one. 

They asked that service commercials (time, weather, etc.) 
not be considered as part of commercial time and agreed that 
these service spots be kept to a maximum of two an hour. 

They asked that a program be defined as "from sign-on to 
sign-off." This would mean that the average quarter hour 
period would actualK' run 14 minutes. On network affiliates 
it runs 14:20. 

They asked that dramatizations of controversial issues not 
be prohibited but instead be plainly labeled. 

As indicated, the committee headed by Ted Cott did a fine 
job — a realistic job. Every one of the 1 2 man i;roup had one 
objective, to suggest changes which would make it possible 
for independent stations to abide by the code. 

As though to emphasize this, the committee made a special 
request that no code become NAB standard until the stations 
of the nation had 60 days to study it. 



We need a Standard of Practice realistically geared to 
public interest. The suggested formula with modifications as 
submitted by the independent stations can be that code. 

Promotion and Publicity U.P.'s 

In the NAB EVALUATION issue (September) sponsors 
stated that radio publicity and promotion couldn't expect to 
have stature until the networks recognized the importance of 
these fields by heading them with vp's. Within 60 days after 
publication of that issue the two major networks acknowl- 
edged how vital promotion, advertising and publicity is in 
these changing days by appointing vp's for these de- 
partments. 

CBS, for years noted as the most promotional minded of the 
chains, has brought back to its fold Victor Ratncr. the man 
who handled promotion and advertising for Columbia during 
its greatest days. He is now vice president in charge of adver- 
tising and promotion. 

NBC appointed Sidney Eiges, its publicity head who has 
risen through the ranks to top management, a vice president. 
At the same time Charles Hammond, formerly director of 
advertising and promotion who had previously been ap- 
pointed assistant to the General Manager, Frank Mullen, 
also was made a vp. 

When publicity and promotion achieves policy-making level 
at the networks— nothing but good can come of it. 



78 



SPONSOR 



Thank you. Gentlemen, 
For Those Kind Words.,. 

We refer, of course, to the words of the distinguished panel of 
advertisers and agency men who served as the judges for The 
Billboard's 10th Annual Radio Promotion Competition. We are 
proud and honored to have had our entry voted FIRST in the 
Over-all Promotion Division and THIRD in the Public Service 
Promotion Division among ell clear channel network affiliates. 

Our thanks, too, to The Billboard for sponsoring this annual 
competition, and to the staff for their monumental task in pre- 
paring the excellent report on this year's entries. 



WE I QUOTE... 

"WLW has long been recognized as 
one of the ablest operators in the 
many-angled field of promotion. 
The station's entry in this year's 
The Billboard's over-all competition 
bears this out. More than that, the 
entry, a compendium of informa- 
tion, shapes up as a veritable bibie 
of promotional procedure. Scarcely 
a facet is untouched and all of 
the expository material shows an 
adult approach. 

"The accent is not on the 'gimmick'; 
neither is it on the flashy or cute 



type of promotion which reads well 
but proves nonproductive. Rather, 
the WLW conception of promotion 
is all-embracing and involves the 
highest levels of activity in merchan- 
dising, audience building, and test 
planning. Unlike the promotional 
operation cf most stations, that of 
WLV/ has an architectural quality. 
It has structure and it is many-di- 
mensioned. It succeeds in selling 
the station's programs to listeners, 
the virtues of WLW to time buyers, 
and thru special services it helps 
the merchant with his problems." 



WLW 

THE NATIONS MOST MERCHANDISE ABLt STATION 



CROSLEY BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



LET'S TALK TlTlMC^jr^ 




BASK 

ABC Network 



CLEVELAND 



850 KC 

5000 Watts 



\ 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



GENERAL LIBRARY 

80 HOr^EFEUER PLAZA, NEW YORK, N.Y 

DECEMBER 1947 

50c • $5.00 per year 





Why sponsors change agencies 
Difference between Nielsen ai^ 



TV costs • Coffee on the ai> 
ooper ratings • ^pot Trends 




Look Ijeliind tlie j-cnrrying crowd>. the ^^vift 
elevators, the hrick. glass and concrete of 
any giant office huilding. There yon find 
steel girders, bonded together in an intricate 
pattern of strength. This is the framework 
. . . the skeleton that lets the bnilding rise to 
incredible heights and stand for long years 
— dependably. 

No less dej)eiidable is the framework of 
the seven F\»rt Industry stations. Known by 
20,000,000 people in seven leading markets, 



thcv are bonded bv coimuoii standard: — (tf 
iinconnnon quality — that let them render 
the be^t in broadcasting service. 

Backed by the Fort Indu>try (.ompany's 
20 years of growing with radio, these sta- 
tions—from Michigan to Florida — have 
gained their enviable reputations only 
through self-imposed standards of service. 
They have maintained these standards 
always with a dependability that wiii> the 
respect of listener and advertiser alike. 




THE FORT INDUSTRY COMPANY 

Mi SI»D. Toledo. O. • \\ WVA. Wh««linp. ^:\i.. • W MM\. Fairmonl. Vtl Va. 
WI.OK.I.iiiiii.O. • W JHK.n.lroit.Mirh. • W \<;\. \llaiil;i.(;a. • \^(.HS. "Miami. Ha. 



"ion can hank on a 
Fort Industry Stalion" 



\ 



m 



t^^S^i^OBBim 



i. SPONSOR RE^ 



S... SPONSOR REPORTS.. 




DECEMBER 1947 



DENTYNE 
FIRST 



MULTIPLE 

PRODUCT 

SELLING 



PER-STATION 
NON-NETWORK 
RRVRMTIR 




American Chicle's market saturation with jingles pays off, according 
to November New York Pulse survey. Chicle's Dentyne was credited 
with being air-advertised gum best remembered. Chiclets (also 
Chicle's) came in second. More than 25 per cent of audience sur- 
veyed recalled Dentyne. American Chicle spends more on spot than 
any other gum advertiser. 

-SR- 

How to get most out of air commercials is problem facing network 
advertisers who in past used multiple programs and now expect to 
sell multiple products via single big audience shows. Standard 
Brands, dropping Fred Allen at end of month, will sell many items 
with Charlie McCarthy. 

-SR- 

NAB study of non-network revenue for the 1,400 AM stations operating 
during 1947 indicates calendar year gross will approach $275,000,000 
as aeainst $241,000,000 reported by FCC for 1946 's 953 stations. 
kB analysis reveals drop in per-station revenue. However, 
ige drop is lessened by fact that a number of the 1,400 sta- 
jre not on air whole of 1947. 

-SR- 
)nsors were signed for 13 weeks by Milwaukee's WTMJ-TV before 
s first telecast. Bulova, Gettelman Brewing, Socony- Vacuum, 
'ma-Stone, Gimbel Brothers, Boston Store, Ed Schuster, and 
lills started, with the station, December 3. 

-SR- 
mt stores in $5-10,000,000 and $2-5,000,000 sales classifi- 
increased their radio expenditures slightly in 1946 over 
?10,000,000-and-over group kept broadcasting budgets static. 
)r budgets in $5-10,000,000 group were off, increased in 
),000 class. Figures just released by National Retail Dry 



ssociation, 



-SR- 



HISTMAS GIFT ORDER FORM -phla's WCAU is first station to record all broadcasts for 



ALL PROGRAMS 



FM'S 

UNATTENDED 

SALESMEN 



icxciciioe. Advertisers will be able to check programs for two years 
from broadcast. Quality will not be good enough for rebroadcast but 
adequate for reference. 

-SR- 

Latest technique used by FM broadcasting stations to sell medium is 
placing of receiving sets in locations where natural and man-made 
static is high and interference with AM reception greatest. Signs 
are spotted before receivers calling attention to clarity of pro- 
gram, etc. Typically, Cincinnati's WCTS installed sets in two 
street cars and two buses. Another station placed sets in printing 



SPONSOR, Vol. 2, No. 2, December 1947. Published monthly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 N. Mervine St., Philadelphia 
41, Pa. Advertising, Editorial and Circulation officss. 40 W. 52 St., New York, N. Y. Subscription $5.00 a year in U. S., $5.50 elsewhere. Applica- 
tion is pending acceptance under act of June 5, 1934 



DECEMBER 1947 







Look behind the scurrying crowds, the swift 
elevators, the brick, ghiss and concrete of 
any giant oflice Itiiilding. There you find 
steel girders, bonded together in an intricate 
pattern of strengtli. This is the framework 
. . . the skeleton that lets the building rise to 
incredible heights and stand for long years 
— dependably. 

No lesf. dependable is the framework of 
the seven Fort Industry stations. Known by 
20,000. ()()() people in seven leading markets, 



they are bonded by < 
uncommon (piality - 
the best in broadcast 
Backed by the Ft 
20 years of growing 
tions — from Michi: 
gained their envia 



SPECIAL CHRISTMAS RATES 

One Sub. . $5.00 ea. 5-14 Subs., $4.00 < 

2-4 Subs., $4.50 ea. 15-24 Subs., $3.50 e 

25 Subscriptions and mora, $3.00 f». 



through self- 
They have maintained these standards 
always with a dependability that wins the 
respect of listener and advertiser alike. 




"l«i/ can blink on a 
Fort Industry Stiiiion" 



THE FORT INDUSTRY COMPANY 

\^SIM). Tolr.lo. (). • W W\ A.\\h..liiig. W;>;i. • WMMN. Fairmont. \^;Va. 
W l.OK.I.ima.O. . W jnK.D.In.il.Mioh. • W \(. A. Allaiila.(.a. • W (, MS. Miami. Fl.n. 




r. SPONSOR REl 



S... SPONSOR REPORTS.. 




DECEMBER 1947 



DENTYNE 
FIRST 



MULTIPLE 

PRODUCT 

SELLING 



PER-STATION 
NON-NETWORK 
REVENUE 
DOWN 



WTMJ-TV 
COMMERCIAL 
FROM FIRST 
TELECAST 



DEPARTMENT 
STORES 



INCREASED 
RADIO BUDGETS 
SLIGHTLY 



WCAU 

RECORDS 

ALL PROGRAMS 



FM'S 

UNATTENDED 

SALESMEN 



American Chicle's market saturation with jingles pays off, according 
to November New York Pulse survey. Chicle's Dentyne was credited 
with being air-advertised gum best remembered. Chiclets (also 
Chicle's) came in second. More than 25 per cent of audience sur- 
veyed recalled Dentyne. American Chicle spends more on spot than 
any other gum advertiser. 

-SR- 

How to get most out of air commercials is problem facing network 
advertisers who in past used multiple programs and now expect to 
sell multiple products via single big audience shows. Standard 
Brands, dropping Fred Allen at end of month, will sell many items 
with Charlie McCarthy. 

-SR- 

NAB study of non-network revenue for the 1,400 AM stations operating 
during 1947 indicates calendar year gross will approach $275,000,000 
as against $241,000,000 reported by FCC for 1946 's 953 stations. 
Thus, NAB analysis reveals drop in per-station revenue. However, 
percentage drop is lessened by fact that a number of the 1,400 sta- 
tions were not on air whole of 1947. 

-SR- 
Nine sponsors were signed for 13 weeks by Milwaukee's WTMJ-TV before 
station's first telecast. Bulova, Gettelman Brewing, Socony-Vacuum, 
RCA, Perma-Stone, Gimbel Brothers, Boston Store, Ed Schuster, and 
Botany Mills started, with the station, December 3. 

-SR- 
Department stores in $5-10.000,000 and $2-5,000,000 sales classifi- 
cations increased their radio expenditures slightly in 1946 over 
1945. $10,000,000-and-over group kept broadcasting budgets static. 
Newspaper budgets in $5-10,000,000 group were off, increased in 
$2-5,000,000 class. Figures just released by National Retail Dry 
Goods Association. 

-SR- 

Philadelphia's WCAU is first station to record all broadcasts for 
reference. Advertisers will be able to check programs for two years 
from broadcast. Quality will not be good enough for rebroadcast but 
adequate for reference. 

-SR- 

Latest technique used by FM broadcasting stations to sell medium is 
placing of receiving sets in locations where natural and man-made 
static is high and interference with AM reception greatest. Signs 
are spotted before receivers calling attention to clarity of pro- 
gram, etc. Typically, Cincinnati's WCTS installed sets in two 
street cars and two buses. Another station placed sets in printing 



SPONSOR, Vol. 2, No. 2, December 1947. Published monthly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 N. Mervine St., Philadelphia 
41, Pa. Advertising, Editorial and Circulation offices, 40 W. 52 St., New York, N. Y. Subscription $5.00 a year in U. S., $5.50 elsewhere. Applica- 
tion is pending acceptance under act of June 5, 1934 



DECEMBER 1947 



BLOCK- 
PROGRAM 
PROMOTION 



ROAD-SHOW 

BENEFITS 

EVERYBODY 



FTC INVESTI- 
GATING NET- 
WORK DISCOUNT 
STRUCTURES 



JUVENILES 
SECOND TO 
SPORT FANS AS 



plants, where static-producing presses make AM radio reception 
virtually impossible. 

-SR- 

NBC's "Parade of Stars" promotion for 1946-1947 is based upon block- 
programing technique with all stars on any one evening plugging 
evening and each other. First evening to be promoted is Wednesday, 
NBC's anti-Bingsday operation. 

-SR- 

Tom Breneman's "Breakfast in Hollywood" cross-country tour made 
$110,725 gross profit in seven cities. Profit was divided between 
Community Chest and Damon Runyon Memorial Fund. Actual road-showing 
of program cost Breneman sponsors (Procter & Gamble and Kellogg) 
nothing and brought them tremendous goodwill and increased audience. 

-SR- 

Discount structure of one network is being examined by Federal Trade 
Commission to discover if web's volume and frequency discounts are 
not actions in "restraint of trade." Implications are that same 
investigation will be extended to other chains if anything legally 
"actionable" is uncovered. 

-SR- 

Survey just made in New York, Chicago, and Detroit by ad-agency re- 
veals that next to sporting fans TV's greatest present audience are 
juveniles. New York had most kiddie viewers (32 per cent of TV 



TOP TV AUDIENCE homes during one week), second was Detroit (24 per cent), and 



Chicago third (18 per cent) 



AIR WILL BE 
CLEANER 



-SR- 



Double entendre on air will be noticeably less during 1947-1948. 
Network meetings with comedians and writers have brought agreement 
to avoid airing anything that gets church-goers' backs up. Pressure 
came from number of religious groups who noted increase of question- 
able cracks during 1946-1947. 

-SR- 



UP 


INS. 


AP 


WORKING 


ON 


TV 



FM SETS AND 
TUNERS IN LOW 
PRICE FIELD 



United Press, Associated Press, International News Service are all 
out after piece of TV pie. AP's newsreel has been seen on air num- 
ber of times. INS moving news-tape and service has recently gone 
into TV pictorial news field. UP, functioning through Acme News 
(its photographic affiliate), has released still pictures with TV 
script to telecasters. 

-SR- 

Price problem in FM radio receiver field, which has held back FM 
development, will be overcome within next six months by nine FM 
tuners and converters selling under $30 and table model FM receiver 
at $40. Pilotuner proved to manufacturers that public, will buy 
tuner or converter and race is on to fill demand. 



SPONSOR 




FREE & PETERS, INC. 




You have many times wished one Kansas 
City broadcaster could furnish you complete 
coverage of Kansas City's vast primary trade 
area. Your wish has come true! 

We at KMBC proudly announce that on 
December 7th KFRM— our 5,000 watt "First 
on Your Dial" (5 50 KC) service for rural 
Kansas —ofiScially goes on the air. 

Note from the map how the KMBC-KFRM 
half millivolt contours envelop western Mis- 
souri and practically all of Kansas. This cover- 
age was planned after a study by Dr. W. D. 
Bryant, Director of the Department of Re- 
search and Information of Kansas City. This 
study (a copy will be mailed you on request) 
proved that Kansas City's Primary Trade Ter- 
ritory is the area shown in the accompany- 
ing map. 



The KMBC-KFRM team is available to 
sponsors for early morning and noon farm 
service programs, also at certain other times. 
KFRM alone is available during its remaining 
hours on the air— at present daytime only. 

KFRM will be programmed from KMBC 
studios, from the KMBC Service Farms, and 
from the Kansas City Livestock Exchange 
Building and other KMBC program sources. 
"Nuflfsaid!" 

Yes, we chalk it up as another KMBC 
"First."— First to cover a great trade territory 
by placing a transmitting station (it's in cen- 
tral Kansas) a great distance from the trade 
center and cash in on this economical concen- 
trated trade area coverage. Ask Free & Peters. 




President 



KFRM • THE KANSAS FARM STATION IN THE 
NATION • PROGRAMMED BY KMBC FROM 

DECEMBER 1947 



HEART OF THE 
KANSASCITY 



%. 



IW.'i 



tm^^ 



\^M 



SPONSOR REPORTS 1 

40 WEST 52ND 4 

MR. SPONSOR: J. WARD MAURER 6 

NEW AND RENEW 9 

P.S. 1 2 
WHY SPONSORS CHANGE AGENCIES 15 

TV COSTS 18 

BANKERS' MYSTERY 20 

COFFEE ON THE AIR 22 

SPOT TRENDS 24 

NIELSEN AND HOOPER RATINGS 28 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 32 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 34 

HOME ECONOMICS SELLING 37 

THE INTERIM CODE 38 

INDUSTRY CHART: COFFEE 41 

SIGNED AND UNSIGNED 45 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 51 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 62 

APPLAUSE 162 




Published -monthlv bv SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Executive, 
Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 Street, New 
Yorkl9, N.Y. Telephone: Plaza 3-6216. Chicago Office: 410 
N.Michigan, relepnone: Whitehall 3540. Publication Offices: 
5S00 North Mervine Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. Subscrip- 
tions: United States $5 a vear; Canada $5.50. Single copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1947 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



President and Publisher: Norman R. Glenn. Secretary- 
Treasurer: Elaine C. Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. Koehler. 
Associate Editors: Frank Bannister, Charles Sinclair. .'\rt 
Director: Howard Wechslcr. .\dvertising Director: Lester 
J. Blumenthal. Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper, 
Chicago Manager: Ksv Brown. (Los .Xngeles) Duncan A.Scott 
A Co., 448 P. Hill St.; (San Francisco) Duncan A. Scott & Co.. 
Mills Bldg. (!^reulation Manager: Milton Kaye. 



;iiVER;PICTLRE: The Fi,r es'Food store Quiz sells cof- 
fi-e'pp the' spot with priie.« and everything (see page 22) 



riiwii 



THE CONTINENTAL STORY 

In your April issue of sponsor, you 

gave an interesting story of our Grand 

Slam radio show. 
We would very much like to have a 

copy of this issue for each one of our 

bread bakeries in the Pacific Coast 

Region. 

S. E. Fletcher 
Regional sales manager 
Continental Baking Company 
Sacramento, Calif. 



HOODS AGENCY POINTS OUT— j 

We would like to point out to you an 
oversight on your part in the November 
issue of SPONSOR. In your list of milk i 
companies using radio programs, you did ! 
not indicate that H. P. Hood & Sons 
sponsor E. B. Rideout at 7:55 a.m., j 
Monday through Saturday, over WEE I, 
Boston, and have done so since 1938. 

You may be interested to know that I 
the September-October Pulse gives the 
7:45-8:00 a.m. period a rating of 6.4. 
Our client is reaching, with their E. B. 
Rideout weather forecast, more than 100 
per cent more listeners than any other 
program enjoys at that time. 

We would like to further call to your 
attention the fact that according to the 
September-October Pulse, this 6.4 rating 
is the top' rated program, network or local, 
from sign-on until 1 1 :00 a.m. 

We bring this to your attention because 
we believe it is a splendid illustration of 
sound thinking on the part of H. P. Hood j 
& Sons in using radio as a medium. It is ; 
also an excellent example of happy rela- 
tions between a sponsor and program over 
a period of nine years. 

Congratulations on a swell article on 
milk companies using radio as an adver- \ 
tising medium. j 

Jan Gilbert 
Timebnyer 

Harold Cabot & Co. /nc. 
Boston 

Five-minuU commercials are generally classified as , 
spots and all of H. P. Hood's radio adtiertising was \ 
in this cateqorv. 



MBS NOT TRAVELING ALONE 

By the time your November issue 
reached the desks of your subscribers, a 
few developments had occurred which put 
an "out'of'date" stamp on your news 
item titled MBS Research Travels Alone. 
That's the thing about this business — 
things keep happening in complete dis- 
regard of editorial deadlines. 
With the appointment of a special com- 
{Please turn to page 61) 







'"fCTOR 






Midwest's First Radio 
SPORTS AUTHORITY 
andKRNTHasHim! 

"Iron Man" Al Couppee knows the 
game — ALL games, because he's played 
them all. He quarterbacked Iowa Us 
famous Iron Men team of 1939 .. . 
recent Washington Redskin stalwart, 
pro and amateur baseball, basketball, 
boxing, hockey. His athletic back- 
ground gave Al Couppee an immediate, 
tremendous radio audience. HARRY 
WISMER ol ABC says: "Al Couppee, one 
of America's great football players, cer- 
tainly should be one of America's best 
sports announcers." 

No play-by-plays available, but ask your 
Kafz man about another REAL BUY— 
Al Couppees Nightly 10:15-10:30 
Sport scast! 

! KRNT is available with WNAX and WMJ as! 
1 the Mid-states Group. Represented by The 
' Kal2 Agenc). 

OTTTil, 



DES MOINES 

ItHE RECISia AND TIIIUNE STATION 



SPONSOR 



Ask 



your national representative 

You're on the verge of a decision, and 

a problem. What trade papers to 
pick for your 1948 station promotion? 
It's no problem to kiss off, for 

your choice can have a 
telling effect on your national 

spot income next year. But where to get 

the facts? The answer is simple. 
Ask your national representative. 

He knows. His salesmen get around. 
They learn which trade papers are appreciated, read 
and discussed by buyers of broadcast time. 
His is an expert opinion. 
Don't overlook your national representative. 




For Buyers of Broadcast Advertising 



DECEMBER 1947 



Remember the 
story about . . . 



r 



Kitty Hawk? 



W.--, 



b^=5*^ 



■•//f^-!^ 



^ 



^ \ 



The Spirit of St. Louis i 



-.^xi^?; 



0M' 



And now these big babies? 

It's not too far a cry to com- 
pare the growth of WWDC 
with the increasing loads 
planes carry. Both started 
small. Grew bigger . . . and 
bigger. Today WWDC and 
WWDC-FM ore giants in the 
influence they wield in this 
great Washington market. 
If it's sales power . . . and 
ability to lift your goods 
over great spaces . . . down 
here the way to do it is 
1450 on the dial. 



Only one other station in 

Washington has more 

loyal listeners 

WWDC 

AM-FM-The D.C. Independent 



Mr. Sponsor: 1 




•I. Waril Maiirer^ 



Director oF Advertising, Wildroot Co. 

^T Tard Maurer is the home-town bo> who made good with the home- 
^ ^ town firm, but there's nothing provincial about his thinking. 
Wildroot's ad budgets have soared from 1942's $208,000 to I947's big- 
time $2,500,000 under the guidance of this forceful, 37-year-old Buffalo 
ad man. His faith in Wildroot's advertising is great, and his faith in 
Wildroot's radio greater (air selling gets some 75 per cent of the budget) 
because, while all other hair tonic sales went up 85 per cent in 1942-47> 
Wildroot sales shot up 534 per cent. Maurer credits this to hard-hitting 
advertising and promotion; adds that four out of five new users today 
prefer the Wildroot type of slickum. 

Ward Maurer knows the hair tonic business from all angles. Since 
1929, when he joined the firm, he's pounded roads with sales crews, met 
grass-roots retailers, staged product demonstrations, and worked in almost 
all Wildroot departments. In 1940 he became Advertising Manager- 
Except for a wartime hitch with Buffalo's Curtiss- Wright plant, he's 
worked fast and furiously ever since to sell Wildroot products to every 
potential user in America. Even Maurer's two little daughters (aged 
three and six) can sing the Wildroot product jingles by heart. 

Wildroot is not new to radio (they participated in NBC's National 
Home Hour as far back as 1929) but today Maurer and Wildroot mer- 
chandise three network shows to dealers- -5ii»i Spade on CBS, King Cole 
Trio Time, which had to have a guest star policy to get its spot, on NBC, 
and What's the Name of that Song? on Don Lee — plus spot campaigns on 
KBS and c.t. breaks in major markets. What's left of the budget goes 
into comics, comic books, car cards, 75 publications, and 57 metropxjlitan 
papers. But Maurer feels it's radio that reaches his market at lowest cost, 

• \\ ilh Kinii Ciilr sinr i>( his Salurdiiy \H<: srrifs. 



SPONSOR 



I 







INQUIRE NOW ABOUT OUR GUARANTEED 
13-26-52 WEEK CONTRACT PLAN 



mroR 




BOSTON 16, MASS. 

FORJOE & CO. •NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



DECEMBERi1947 




ways to 




make a fortune! 



WRVA broadcasts its "Old Dominion Barn Dance" twice a 
day, Monday through Friday, and three more times on Saturday 
night. Which makes a total of 13 ways to make a fortune! 

That's because each of these 13 "Bam Dance" broadcasts offers 
an advertiser the chance to talk a huge audience into becoming his 
customers. Proof? WRVA's morning "Barn Dance" scores a 
thumping 5.8 Hooperating* — one of Richmond's three highest 
during the morning! The afternoon show stacks up a hearty average 
Hooper of 5.0*. And on Saturday night, the "Old Dominion 
Barn Dance" chalks up an average rating of 8.3 . . . the highest 
Hooper among all nighttime local originations broadcast by all 
Richmond stations throughout the entire week!* 

These ratings supply the reasons why 16 companies now are 
sponsoring the "Bam Dance" . . .Vhy you should become the 17th 
advertiser to hire Virginia's greatest selling force: Sunshine Sue, 
The Rangers, Tobacco Tags, Red Murphy, Puffenbarger Kids, and 
the Carter Sisters. 

This successful sales staff is on the air from 9 to 10 a.m. and 
again from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. And on 
Saturday night — from 8:00 to 8:55. from 10:30 to 1 1 :00. from 1 1 :05 
to midnight — they entertain and sell — a billion-dollar market 
with 395,780 radio families.! For details on how WRVA's "Barn" 
Dance" can make a fortune for you in one ( or more I of 13 ways, 
get in toucli with fjO-OOO-watt WRVA — or Radio Sales. 



• C. K. Hooprr. May.Srplrmbrr. 1147. Sincf lir 
rhanptr, thor proitranik have hhiflrd to nrw — 
h«llrr — lime prriod*. The ralf for the Saturday 
nirhl thow ii an avrrafcr for Ihc two Hooper- 
aled thowi. 

4 30.)00'/i BMB Niihllime Area. 




Richmond and Sorjolk, Va. 

Represented by Radio Sales 






5 









SPONSOR 



new and renew 



Ne^AA ^<Ul04i4U BfUii liuli4ije^ 



f 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCy 



STATIONS 



Block I)ru;t C 



Bond Slorrs liic 

(larlir Products ()<> 

Coliimhia Records 

Coiifornial Shoe- Co 
Kdolhrew Brewery Inc 
Florida Citrus (iommission 
(iani'les-Lenger Wine Corp 
General Motors <.<>rp 
A. C. (iilbert C:o 

Ink<>)>rapli Co 

Isbrandtsen-Moller Co 
Lever Bros Co. 

L«.\vis-Houe Co 

Ford Mulliens Inc 
Oxidern Co 

Reliance Chemicals (Montreal) 
Trans-World Airways 
United Artists 



OmeHa Rub 


Cecil & Presbrey 


50-75 


Allenru 


Kcilfield-.lohnstcMie 


10-20 


Clothing 


NeB-Rogow 


25 


Little Liver I'ills 


Ted Bates 


lOO 


"Masterwork" 


McCann-Krickson 


5-15 


recordings 






Shoes 


CJuilford 


10-25 


Beer, Ale 


Roy S. Durstinc 


20-50 


Fruits 


Benton & Bowles 


25-50 


Wines 


Adair & Director 


8-15 


Buick cars 


Kudner 


50-100 


American Flyer 


Charles W. Iloyt 


10-15 


trains 






Pens 


L. E. McGivena 


4 


"26" Coffee 


Cowan & Denftler 


10-20 


Rinso 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


75-100 


Silver Dust 


SSC&B 


75-100 


Turns 


Roche. Williams & 
Cleary 


50-100 


"4711" toiletries 


Kelly, Nason 


14 


Salve 


Kdward Hamburger 


50-60 


Anti-freeze 


Harold F. Stan field 


25-50 


Transportation 


BBD&O 


10-15 


Motion pictures 


Donahue & Coe 


\arious 



CAMPAIGN, start, durat'on 



F.t. spots, breaks; Nov-Dec; 8-1.? wks 

K.t. spots, breaks (expanding coverage in .South- 
central, Southwest); Dec I; 1.? wks 

Spot programs, e.t. spots and breaks (expanding cur- 
rent campaigns); .Nov-Dec; l.i-52 wks 

K.t. spots, breaks (expanding current nati campaigns); 
Nov-Dec; 52 wks 

55-min classics programs; Nov-Dec-,lan ; 1.? wks 

Live, e.t. spots; Dec I; H wks 

E.t. anncmts; Nov-Dec; \S wks 

Canadian spots thru season; major nikts; about Dec 1 

E.t. anncmts; Jan 1; 1<> wks 

E.t. anncmts; Nov 10; 1.? wks 

Christmas prom with e.t., live spots; Dec 15; 2-4 wks 

Test campaign with .?0-min local programs, participa- 
tions; Nov-Dec; Li wks 
E.t. anncmts; Dec 1: H wks 
E.t. spots, breaks; Dec-Jan; \}> wks 
E.t. spots, breaks; Dec-Jan; l.< wks 
E.t. spots, breaks; Dec 1; 13 wks 

Bouquet of Music, 15-min e.t.; Nov ">; \S wks 

E.t. anncmts in non-metropolitan mkts; Dec-Jan; 

13 wks 
E.t. anncmts; Nov-Dec; 13 wks 
E.t. spots, breaks; Dec 1; 13 wks 
E.t. spots, breaks; Nov-Dec 



J^euA G>nd (le^e^A^ed att '^eleolUoH. 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATION 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Let's Pop the Question; .Sun 8:.?0-9 pni; Oct 20; 2() wks (n) 

Weather spots; Nov 2; 13 wks (r) 

Weather spots; Nov 14; 13 wks (r) 

Weather spots; Oct 23; 13 wks (r) 

Weather spots; Oct; 13 wks (r) 

Weather spots; Fri nights; Oct 24; 13 wks (n) 

Spots in Doorway to Fame; Mon 7:30-8 pm; Oct 20; 13 wks (ii) 

Weat 



Spots; Sun aft; Sep 7; 13 wks (n) 

Spots; Wed 7:30 pm; Sep 17; 13 wks (n) 

Handy Man; Fri 8:30-8:45 pm; Oct 17; 13 wks (r) 

School of Sports; Fri 11-11:15 pm; .Sep l'»; 13 wks (n) 

Weather spots; Oct 12; 13 wks (r) 

Philadelphia— A Great City; Th 8:15-8:30 pm; Oct 30; 13 wks (n) 

Spots; five weekly; Oct 27; 13 wks (n) 

Spots before football games; Oct 12; season (n) 

Film spots; Th nights; Nov 6; 26 wks (n) 

Spots preceding basketball games; Nov 4; season (n) 

Spots; twice weekly; Sep 7; 13 wks (n) 

(;hampionship hockey games; Oct 19; 21 wks (n) 

Doorway to Fame, spots; Mon 8:45-10 pm; Nov 10; 4 wks (n) 

-Minute film spots preceding Dodger, Columbia football games; 

Oct 11 ; season (n) 
Spots preceding football games; Oct 17; sca.son (n) 
Television Matinee; MW 2-3 pm; Oct 13; 26 wks (n) 
Chicago Blackhawks Hockey Games; as scheduled; Nov 2; 1") 

wks (n) 

Spots in Birthday Party; Th 7:30-8 pm; Oct 16; 52 wks (n) 
Spots after sports events; Sun aft; .Sep 28; 10 wks (n) 
RCA-Victor Varieties; Tu 4-5 pm (films). Wed 4-5 pm (children's 

show), Th 4-5 pm (fiishion show). Fri 3:15-5 pm (football); 

Oct 28; 8 wks (n) 
Spots; twice weekly; Nov 2; 26 wks (n) 
Small Fry; Tu 7-7:.30 pm; Nov 4; 13 wks (n) 
Home .Service (Mub (Tex & Jinx); Fri 1-1 :,?0 pm; Nov 7; 13 wks (n) 

.Spots in .Swing into Sports; Mon 8:45-9 pm; Oct 6; 13 wks (n) 
Spots; Sun nights; Oct 26; 13 wks (n) 






»-^v. 






Battel's Inc (appliances) 
Botany Worsted Mills 



Brentwood .Sportswear 
Jay Bucknell Inc 
B\ D Corp 
C;hex Clandy (m 
Elizabeth Davidson 
DuMont Marine Service 
General Foods Sales Corp 

(Maxwell House Coffee div) 
George's Radio & Television 

Co 
Gimbel Bros (Phila.) 
Gunther Brewing Co 

JilTy Products Inc 
Philip Klein Advertising 
La Pointe Plascomold Corp 

Lcktrolite (;orp 



P. J. Nee Furniture C:o 
.Norge Dealers 
Onyx Novelty Co 
Pepsi-Cola Co (Evervess) 



Philadelphia Electric Cio 
Philco Distributors (Chi.) 

and Emergency Radio & 

.\ppliance C^o 
Purified Down Products Corp Direct 
Shade .Shop 
Southern Wholesalers and 

RCA-Victor Distributors 

Stoumen Rug Co 
Strauss Stores (autos) 
Sv\lf t & Co 



Transmirra Products Corp 
Wheeler Inc 



Edward .Shapiro 


WFIL-TV. Phila. 


Silberstein-Cioldsmith 


K TLA, L. A. 




WBKB, Chi. 




WPTZ, Phila. 




WNBT, N. Y. 


John F. Arndt 


WPTZ, Phila. 


Direct 


WABD, N. Y. 


(Jrey 


WFIL-TV, Phila. 


.Soils S. Cantor 


WPTZ. Phila. 


Soils S. Cantor 


WPTZ. Phila. 


Direct 


WABD. N. Y. 


Benton & Bowles 


WNBT, N. Y. 


Robert J. Enders 


WNBW, Wash. 


Direct 


WPTZ, Phila. 


Booth, Vickery & 


WNBW, Wash. 


.Schwinn 




Martin & Andrews 


WPTZ. Phila. 


Philip Klein 


WFIL-TV, Phila. 


Direct 


WABD, N. Y. 




WTTG. Wash. 


Donahue & Coe 


WABD, N. Y. 




WBKB. Chi. 


MacKenney & .Schontz 


WFIL-TV. Phila. 


Harwood Martin 


WNBW. Wash. 




WWJ-TV. Detr. 


Direct 


WABD. N. Y. 


Young & Rubicam 


WCBS- TV. N. Y. 




WFIL-TV. Phila. 


Direct 


WPTZ. Phila. 


Direct 


W BKB. Chi. 


Direct 


WABD. N. Y. 


James .S. Beat tie 


WNBW. Wash. 


Henry J. Kaufman 


WNBW. Wash. 


Ralph A. Hart 


WFIL-TV. Phila 


William Warren 


WABD. N. Y. 


McOann-Erickson 


WNBT. N. Y. 




WPTZ. Phila. 




WNBW. Wash. 


Direct 


WABD. N. Y. 


James .S. Beat lie 


WNBW, Wash. 







NeuA On Neiwo^Uu 



SPONSOR 



AGENCy 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, rtart, duration 



Itrollu-rliiiiiti iif K;iilriiiul 

'I'raiiiniL'ii 
Coiii-Cola Co 
hitl MilliiiU Co 
KiiisiT-Fra/.er Corp 

ludi-ii's Inc- 
IMIoi Kiidio Corp 

Si-iilli'sl liu- 
roiii Co 
\N liiu-liiill l*harniiu'iil Co 



\Nilli;nii voii Zehli- 

D'Arcy 

A. A. Crook 

Swancy, Drake ^ lU-iiii'iil 

J. M. Matins 
(Jruy 

McKee & Mhri^hi 
h'ooli', Cone & BcldiiiA 
l)anier-Kil/.(>i'rald-Sample 



MBS 
MBS 
Mils 


400 
I2S 

42S 


CBS 
MBS 


(>7 
26 


NBC 
NBC 
ABC 


*92 
143 
17 Pai 



Dorolliy KuldlicinrK News Analysis; Sal .S:4.S-6 pn>; Nca 

IS; hi wks 
Morton Downey; l"l hS ll:l!>-ll:.<0 pm; Oct 2H: S2 wks 
Uueen for a Day; MWK 2:.«I-2.4.S pm; Sep 29; .S2 wks 
Newscopc; T'lliS 7:.<II-7:4S pm. Sun 8:45-9 pm; Nov 4; 

52 wks 
Strike It Rich; Sun 10:30-11 pm; Nov 2; 52 wks 
American Forum of the Air; Tu 10-10:30 pm; Oct 2K; 

2(> w ks 
\ ilhme Store; I h '»:30-10 pm; Oct 16; 52 wks 
This Is Nora Drake; MTWTK 11-11:15 am; Oct 27; 52 wks 
Zeke Manners; M IWI !• 10:45-11 am; Jan 5; 52 wks 



17 Ariz, and I'ac stations added. 
iFiflv-tito weekt QenrrtiHv mrans n 13-ireek coniracl with optinnM fnr .? ttiecfttivt 13-wefk renrtDah. fCt tnhjrrt to mnc^lbxtion nf thf end of finv 13-wrek n^rmti) 



/^enewali Oh. Meiwo^iLi 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Amer Home Products Corp 
Campana .Sales Co 
Chesehrouilli Mfft Co 
ICU'Ctric .\uto-l.ite Co 
I, ever Bros Co 
P. I.orillard Co 
Pet Milk Sales Co 
IVxas Co 



Dancer- Fit zfterald- Sam pie 

Clements 

McCann-Krickson 

Ruihrauff & Ryan 

J. Walter Thompson 

I.ennen & Mitchell 

<;ardner 

Hiich;iiiaii 



CBS 


117 


NBC 


!•» 


CBS 


156 


CBS 


1.58 


CBS 


151 


CBS 


145 


CBS 


133 


ABC 


264 



Mr. Keen; Th S:30-8:55 pm; Oct 2).\ 52 wks 
.Solitair Time; Sun 11:45-12 am; Nov 2; 52 wks 
Dr. Christian; Wed X:.M)-«:55 pm; Oct 11: 52 wks 
Dick llavmes; Th 9-9:30 pm; Oct 9; 52 wks 
Lux Radio Theatre; Mon 9-10 pm ; Oct 6; 52 wks 
Old (,old Show; Wed 9-9:.<0 pm; Oct 11; 52 wks 
Mary Lee Taylor; Sat 10:.«1-I1 am; Oct 25; 52 wks 
Metrop*»litan Oper;i; Sat 2 pm t«» end; No\ 15; IS wks 



NeuA A<fe*uu^ Afi^pxU4'vUfte4iti 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



Appalachian Coals Inc. (Hnci 

Fred W . .\mend Co, Danville, III 

\merican Telecastinft Corp. L. A 

\tlas Powder Co (Cellulose Products Div), Stamford, 
Conn 



Coal 

.Chuckles candy 

.Television drama school. 



. Ilaehnle. (;inci. 
Foote. Cone & Belding. Chi. 
Capka. Kennedy & Duke. Il'wood. 



Beauty Fair Magazine, N. Y 

Beltone Ilearinii .\id Co, Chi 

Ben-Ilur Products Inc, L. A 

Best F'oods Inc. N. Y 

Borden Co (Pioneer Ice Cream dIv), N. Y. 



Buick .\utomotive Dealers Assn, Detroit. . . 

H. v.. <:otter & Co, Chi 

Cremo Brewing Co Inc, New Britain, Conn. 

A. B. Farquhar Co, York. Pa 

Peter F'ox Brewinft Co. (;hi 

(ianeles-Lenfter Wine Corp, N. Y 

Haiti's Wheet tlo. New Haven 

Peter Henderson & Co, N. Y 

Hoffman Fift Ranch Inc. Northrldfte, Calif.. 

Inland l"ertili/.er Co. L. .■\. 

Interstate Labs Inc. Louisville 

Kenite Labs Inc. N. Y 

Klein Chocolate Co Inc, F^li/.ahethtown, Pa. 
I. ever Bros Co, Cambridfte, Mass 



(Thomas J. Liplon Inc div, lloboken, N. J.). 

(Pepsodent div. Chi.) 

Liberty Maflazine Inc, N. Y 

Mantle Lamp Co of .\mer, Chi 

Leo .1 . Mevberft Co, L, A 

Morton Salt Co, Chi 

National Biscuit Co, N. Y 



National Cheese Co, Chi 

New 'S'ork Decorators Inc. Beverly Hills. Calif 

Noblil l-Sparks Industries Inc, Columbus, Ind 

Noma I'.leclric Corp (Kstate lleatrola div), 

llamillon. O. 

I'erfecto Products Co, L. .\ 

I'roiiress Bedding Co. Detroit 

Khoiles .lewelers. L. ,\ 

l<oberts..lolins<>n & Rand (IntI Shoe Codlv), St. Louis 

Scot t Foresman & Co. Chi. 

Stewart Mf(i Co. Indianapolis 

rransconiinenial i<i Western .Mrllnes, N. Y 

Tweet Inc. Cambridiie. Mass 

Tw in Pines Farm Dairy. Detr 

\ inceiit Seed & Bulb Co. L. A 

< .. \ i\ iano Inc 

S. \. Walter & Co Inc. Albany. N. Y 

\\ :ilii'r llrewin^ Co, Pueblo, Colo 

W FllR. Hallo. 

\Mlm;ir Mlii Co. Phila 

Wilinoi H. Uinionsoii Co. Medford. Mass 



. Zapon finishes, Zapon Keratol coated 

fabrics .\iikin-Kynelt. Phila. 

Publication (Junn-Mears. .N. ^ . 

Ilearinft aids RuthraufT & Ryan. Chi. 

F'ood products Moftfte-Privelt, L. .\. 

Mayonnaise Younft & Rubicam, Toronto. Canadian adv 

Horlon's, Ricciardi's, Carpenter's Ice 

Cream, Borden's Ice Cream local adv. Dohcrly. (Clifford & Shenficid, N. Y. 

Buick dealers Kudner, N. Y. 

Insurance brokers Beaumont & Ilohman. Chi. 

Ale, beer. Dukesa malt tonic Brad-\ern. \aii Diver & Carlyle, N. Y. 

F'arm equipment, machinery N'an.Sant. Duftdale. York. Pa. 

F'ox Deluxe Beer John W. Shaw . Chi. 

Kosher wines Adair & Director. N. Y. 

Wheel Court land I). F'erjlu.son. Wash.. I). C. 

Seeds F). M. Frevstadt. N. Y. 

Packafted fifts Bass-LuckofT. L. A. 

B«acon Brand (ilobe, pestless products Booker-Cooper. L. .\.. national adv 

Oculine eye preparations Morftan. L. .\.. West Coast adv 

Kenite, Kenbric, Kek chemical products .Seidel. N. Y. 

Nic-L-Nul chocolate bar F'rank L. Blumberfi. Ball. 

Lifebuoy Soap. Sullivan. Slauffer, (;olw<>ll & Bavles, N. Y.. 

I . S. adv 

.New product to be announced RuthraufT it Ryan, N. Y. 

Lipton's .Spaftheiti .Sauce Ruthrauff & Ryan, N, Y. 

Pepsodent 'Tooth Powder Needham. Louis & Brorby. Chi. 

Publications <;rant. N. Y. 

.Maddin Kerosene Mantle Lamps William Hart -\dler. Chi. 

Disir, RC.\ TV, radio sets J. Waller Thompson. L. A., regional adv 

Salt Needham. Louis & Brorby. Chi. 

Bakery products Mct^ann-F.rickson. N. V.. IikuI Pac C<iasi adv 

(addition to nati :idv) 

Daisy Brand products Harry J . Lazarus. ( :hi. 

DecoralinC custom furniture \dolphe \\enland. H'wood.. re;>ional adv 

. Radios Roche. W illiams & Cleary. Chi. 



Ranftes Stockton. West. Bur khan. Ciiici. 

.\luminum coffee makers % al Cole. L. A., nail adv 

Restokraf I mattresses Bass. Luckoff it Way burn. Detroit 

Jewelry, retail Bass-LuckofT. L. A. 

Trim I red Shoes Krupnick. St. Louis 

Books C. C. I'oUarty. Chi. 

Kitchen-.\ir X'entilatinfl Fan <>alliip. Indianapolis 

Air travel BBD&O. N. V. 

.Super-whipped marshmallow Baduer & Brownini>. Boston 

Dairy products Bass. l.iickofT & Way burn. Detr. 

Seeds, bulbs Coleman-Jones. L. .\. 

(;old Crest ( lalifornia Wine L. W . Roush. Louisville 

Blue Ribbon Potato Chips Peck. N. ^ . 

Beer Fil M. Hunter. Denver 

Broadcastintl Frank I.. Ulumberil. Balto. 

Peanut but ler Lawrence I. F\erlini>. Phila. 

Ihiniel F. Sullixan. Boston 



{Please tun^ to page •/5) 




KGO at 50,000 Watts 

Most Powerful Station 
On Pacific Coast! 

The new KGO transmitter, on the air Decem- 
ber 1, emits a signal of well over 100,000 watts in 
the San Francisco Bay area! Thus, it completely 
BLANKETS one of the nation's richest, most 
important markets. 

In addition, literally thousands of new radio 
families all over the West Coast can now tune in 
this great new station. Its signal extends all the 
way from the Columbia River to the Mexican 
border. 

Don't overlook KGO in YOUR spot sales plans 
for 1948! And don't delay — because time on the 
West Coast's most powerful station won't wait! 
CaU the ABC representative in your city — today. 



ABC 



SPOT SALES 
DIVISION 



American Broadcasting Company 



Chicago 
Civic Opera Bldg. 
1440 Highland Ave. • 



San Francisco 
155 Montgomery St. 
Detroit . . . Stroh Bldg. 




■ 



DECEMBER 1947 



11 



MEATY FIGURES p.S. 



(See "After Midnight Audience," SPONSOR, May 1947.) 
Do they still listen after the witching hour? Are the adver- 
tisers still buying? What is Barbasol doing? 



on 

MEAT PRODUCTION 

in Big Aggie Land 

Meat islMONEY, today. And 
Figures here show how Folks in 
WNAX BMB Area latch onto 
this "meaty" money. First 
Figure, number of animals or 
birds in the WNAX BMB 109i 
or more area,- second figure, 
WNAX BMB percentage of 
total in 5-state area of Iowa, 
Minnesota, Nebraska, No. Da- 
kota, So. Dakota: 

CATTLE, 12,988,086 74% 
MILKCOWS, 3,032,878 71% 
SWINE, 9,422,873 68% 

POULTRY, 1 1 3,934,808 72% 
TURKEYS, 4,601,951 73% 

All figures based on U. S. Census of 
Agriculture 1945. Does not include 
WNAX BMB counties in Kansas, 
Wyoming, Montana and Canada. 

Surely, the WNAX BMB Area cuts 
a wide swath through the richest farm 
producing country in the world. That 
should be meat for thought if you are 
planning to do business in Big Aggie 
Land. Get the facts about a schedule 
of advertising on WNAX from your 
nearest Katz Man 



WNAX is 
available with 
K R N T and 
WMT as the 
Mid-Slates 
Group. Ask the 
Kali Agency 
lor rales. 




WIN! AX 

SIOUX CITY •YANKTON 



Barbasol's tests of the after-midnight audience coupled with sponsor's 
exclusive A. C. Nielsen report of sets in use from the witching hour on, 
have opened the eyes of advertisers to the selling impact of this marginal 
time period. Of the original Barbasol test group of 14 stations, four 
(WWL, New Orleans; WISH, Indianapolis; WHOT, South Bend; and 
WBBM, Chicago) sold their Barbasol'testcd shows as across-the-board 
packages, within five weeks of the shave cream's unexpected exit. Eight 
of the stations switched from single sponsor operation for the time period 
to a multiple sponsor ^participating) basis. Most of these report they are 
sold out and have a waiting list. On WNEW, New York, Barbasol's con- 
tract is about to run out but its after-midnight broadcasting will continue 
since it's one of the nation's most successful all-night operations. KMOX, 
St. Louis, has dropped its midnight program. 

In Boston, WEEI had a special survey made by Pulse, Inc., and dis- 
covered that many of their CAuh Midnight audience actually start their 
"daily" listening with the program. Seven out of 12 listeners to the 
WEEI program indicated that they tuned to the program after they had 
previously turned their receivers off. 

Barbasol, the test advertiser, is still off the air, except in New York. 
It will have no radio plans until spring of 1948 at the earliest. The com- 
pany's budget is going virtually 100 per cent to plug its Primrose House 
line in newspapers and on billboards. 



p.s. 



(See "Listerine Loves Company," SPONSOR, April 1947.) 
Why Lambert Pharmacal dropped spot broadcasting and returned 
to network radio. What's happened to "Quiz oF Two Cities"? 



National spot broadcasting is still one of broadcasting's most effective 
of all selling devices. The limitation of the vehicle that Lambert Phar- 
macal used (Quiz of Two Cities) forced this organization's withdrawal from 
spot, not spot itself. In the 28 markets where Quiz was used, it produced 
definite sales results. Unfortunately this program is not a practical vehicle 
with which to achieve complete national coverage, which is what Lambert 
wants. 

The fault of the program nationally lies in its basic premise. This 
premise is that coast to coast there are sufficient neighboring cities with 
long-standing rivalries, for series of broadcasts based upon contests 
between them to cover the nation. There just aren't enough such pairs 
of feudin' cities. For a product like Listerine Toothpaste, national cover- 
age is essential. Lambert found that out all too well when distributors 
and wholesalers started griping about lack of advertising in their territories. 

Lambert has returned to network broadcasting with the CBS- William 
Morris package featuring Abe Burrows and Margaret Whiting. It will 
use spot broadcasting to bolster CBS' network coverage where hypoed 
advertising impact is required. 

Quiz of Tuv Cities continues to do a top-drawer job for Gunther 
Brewing in Baltimore-Washington, where the sponsor states that it's a 
"strong personalized selling factor." It won new sponsors in St. Louis- 
suburb and San Francisco-Los Angeles within a month after the Lambert 
cancellation. A number of other stations are continuing to present the 
program on a sustaining basis feeling that it's bound to find a sponsor 
who needs intensified promotion in their areas. 



12 



SPONSOR 




t 

m 



Justin Taft, Jr., age 23, operates the family 400-acre farm near Rochester, lUmois. With [lis father's help, 
he raises corn and soybeans, 20 head of cattle, 100 hogs and 300 chickens. Two brothers attend the University 
of Illinois: William, 25, agricultural marketing, and Arnold, 18, pre-veterinary course. 

Justin plans to build up a registered herd, has consistently been among top winners at cattle shows through- 
out the Midwest. This year at the Illinois State Fair the Taft brothers took second place with a Hereford 
steer which had won in nine county fairs, took seventh place with a Shorthorn. Always active in agricultural 
activities, Justin is president of Sangamon County Rural Youth, chairman of the agriculture committee of 
the Springfield Junior Chamber of Commerce Arnold is sectional vice president of F. F. A., holds the 
American Farmer degree. 

WLS has long played an important part in the Taft family life and in their business of farming. They 
isten regularly to WLS Dinnerbell Time, daily markets — saw the WLS National Barn Dance at the State 
Fair this year. 

It is on such families as the Tafts that WLS microphones have been focused for almost 24 years. To these 
families on farms and in cities and towns of Midwest America, WLS has given the entertainment they 
wanted and the information they needed. Such service has made them loyal WLS listeners . . . and upon 
loyal listeners depend advertising results. 





The comfortable Taft farmstead, 
side Rochester, Illinois. 



Justin Toft, Jr., at 23, operates the 400- 
ocre family form. 



890 kilocycles, 50,000 watts, 
American affiliate. Represented 
by John Blair and Company. 




Justin, It., and Arnold with Ibeir pnze 
winning steers at the Illinois State Fai 



AFFILIATED IN MANAGEMENT WITH THE ARIZONA NETWORK: KOY, PHOENIX . . . KTUC, TUCSON . . . KSUN, BISBEE-LOWELL-DOUGLAS 



DECEMBERI1947 



13 




ON TARGET 

Impact, skillfully delivered and advantage- 
ously followed up, draws million dollar gates. 
Weed and Company's sales impact 
on prospects fills clients' time schedules. 

WEED 

flPD comp«n Y 



RADIO STATION REPRESENTATIVES 

NEW YORK . BOSTON • CHICAGO • DETROIT • SAN FRANCISCO • ATLANTA • HOLLYWOOD 

14 SPONSOR 





v 



\ 




u 



Only agency chief, Duane Jones, second From leFt, smiles as client group sit in judgment on their First TV program. It's that important to them 



* 



|H||MV|'I Ninety per cent of the sponsors who change agencies 
do so without real regard for what the new advertis- 
ing organizations can do. Millions in billing have changed hands 
without the knowledge of the advertising manager of the accounts 
that a change was even contemplated. 

These are just two outstanding facts revealed in a sponsor 
survey of more than 160 of the leading advertisers, a great 
majority of whom use broadcasting. 

Advertising is everybody's business. The president of a great 
manufacturing firm, who would never think of telling his produc- 
tion vp how to handle a manufacturing detail, will dictate adver- 
tising procedure at the drop of a hat. Yet it isn't the executive 
head of a firm who initiates most of the agency changes. It's 
often an important stockholder who isn't happy with a financial 
report who needles top management into making a switch. 
Sometimes the stockholder's dislike of current advertising is in- 
spired by his "friends" who are in the advertising agency business. 

DECEMBER 1947 



Why Sponsors 
Oliange Igendes 



15 



The 72 Reasons Why Sponsors Change Agencies 




broadcast 

Program 

Failure 



Account 
Stockholder Executive 
Request Establishing 
Own Agency 



Account Soonsor c i ^ • • 

oponsor Famtly Organization 

Executive Executive Connections Politics 

Shifts Changes 



Direct Agency's 

Solicitation ?\^'-°" 
Bad Job 



Personality 
Clash 



Black-&-White Product 
Campaign Duplicatioi 
Failure in Agency 



One hundred twenty-two advertisers thai had switched asencies were queried about the change. Reports are tabulated above (Copyrisht 1947) 



Internal advertising agency personnel 
relations are seldom of the best. Agency 
turnover is higher than top management 
at networks. The number of executives 
who remain at an advertising agency long 
enough to "enjoy" the fruits of its pen- 
sion plans is microscopic. This is a fact 
at even the leading agencies and is most 
evident in the radio departments, where 
a lO-year man like Arthur Pryor, BBD&O, 
or John U. Reber, J. Walter Thompson, is 
a rarity. Since agency contact is through 
its executives, the fact that the tenure of 
account executives and departmental 
heads is insecure is responsible for a num- 
ber of account changes. It was logical 
when Bob Orr left Lcnncn and Mitchell 
that he would take with him the Jergens- 
Woodbury business he had been servicing 
for so many years. At L. & M., Orr was 
head man on the account, rode herd per- 
sonally on every radio detail, and took 
each suggested program under his arm to 
Cincinnati for the lotion organization's 
consideration. Radio programs, for the 
record, are the reason foi sponsors' chang- 
ing agencies far more often than cam- 
paigns in any other medium. That's 
because, as one top agency executive ex- 
plained, "there's no Hooper for other 
media." 

Personalities are a vital factor in any 
creative field. Advertising runs true to 
form and McCann-Erickson recently lost 
an account (it has added 65 in the past 10 



years) simply because key men at the 
advertiser and agency rubbed each other 
the wrong way. The proof that the 
agency's job had nothing to do with the 
change in representation is the fact that 
the account is recommending McCann- 
Erickson to a competitor based upon the 
job that the agency had been doing. 

The giant agencies generally hold their 
accounts a long time. Seldom does a 
major account leave one of the top 10 
agencies because of inadequate f)erform- 
ance. The agency would have to have 
done a bad job over a long, long period. 
In a number of cases merchandising and 
promotion men of big firms have felt year 
after year that their agencies weren't pro- 
ducing, but admitted that they were in no 
position to do anything about it. Agency 
moving decisions were made at a higher 
level. 

What took the full radio part of the 
Borden account away from Young and 
Rubicam was in part the fact that Kenyon 
and Eckhardt who had a small part of the 
business (Instant Coffee) were able to 
build Coinify Fair at Borden's lowest cost 
per listener to date. This happened at a 
time when Y&R was handling the Ginny 
Simms CBS airing at one of the highest 
costs per listener in Borden's air history. 
What followed at K&E, the building of a 
program called Arthur's Place to which 
practically no one listened, is history. 
The current Borden program (Mark 



Wamow) isn't high-powered enough for 
CBS and something will be done to give 
it the stature which 9-9:30 p.m. on a 
major network seems to call for. One top 
program doesn't always beget another. 
K&E still has to prove itself on an 
over-all basis to Borden's. 

Some big accounts are gypsies and like 
Ford Motors have wandered from agency 
to agency. The latest Ford move, which 
has it sponsoring, starting January 4, 
Fred Allen (under a Ford dealers mantle), 
with J. Walter Thompson handling the 
program after the radio part of the ac- 
count had moved from Thompson to Ken- 
yon & Eckhardt, justifies the fact that a 
number of agencies excused themselves 
when asked to bid on the Ford account 
last spring. These agencies explain that a 
big account is not profitable unless there 
is assurance that it will stay with the 
agency for two years or more. Ford has a 
big job to do, having definitely slipped in 
the past few years until the present con- 
sumer gag is "there's no Ford in my 
future." Ford needs an inspired adver- 
tising campaign and most agencies point 
out that an account is toughest to handle 
when it's under pressure. The Sunday 
afternoon Ford Theater is an ideal prestige 
vehicle, one that's expected to grow in 
public acceptance — if it's permitted to 
stay on the air long enough. However, 
with a high-pressure, fast-moving vehicle 
(Fred Allen) on the same network on the 



16 



SPONSOR 




When Robert Orr left Lennen and Mitchell 
to start his own ad-agency he took the 
Jergens-Woodbury account along with him 



BBD&O impresses prospective accounts with 
pictures of four of its radio clients in its i 
regular full-page Newsletter advertising r 



same night delivering audiences within 
the top five in radio, the industry wonders 
just how long Henry Ford III will be will- 
ing to carry the class presentation — ^how 
long the account will stay with Kenyon & 
Eckhardt. 

Practically every agency has a giant 
new'business presentation based upon 
one of the top jobs that the agency has 
done for a client, like BBD&O's 500 per 
cent increase for Wildroot. At some 
agencies, a new presentation is designed 
for every prospective client. The think' 
ing back of a custom-tailored pitch is that 
an individual slant is required to influence 
each prospect. In others the presentation 
is standard — selling the organization. 

A number of agencies feel happier when 
they don't win an account through a 
radio program. Broadcasting is right 
under the eyes of every client executive 
and each stockholder is able to hear how 
his advertising dollars are being spent. 
No program ever satisfied everyone. Some 
top shows rub big corporation backers the 
wrong way at the very moment that they 
are selling the greatest amount of prod' 
ucts per ad-dollar. 

Agencies stress, when they can, their 
organizations rather than a campaign. 
It's easy for competition to shoot at an 
individual campaign. It's harder by far 
to knock down an organization with a 
long history of advertising success than it 
{Please turn to page 47) 




I^ Jttb 



When Don Stauffer (left) and S. H. Bayles left Ruthrauff & Ryan for Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, R&R business followed Other Agency biz did too 










Because in one season he landed 
all the Borden radio business and 
most of Ford's, Bill Lewis was rated 
top ad-man of 1 947 by agency men 

The worldwa s all awry when this 
ad was placed by Erwin, Wasey 
(Nov. 5, 1929), but it brought 
•w- them $6,000,000 in billing 




All right, Mister!- woze' that the headache's over 

LET'S GO TO WORK! 












n.o-i<^.««u 



B':: 









ERWIN, WASEY & COMPANY 

Advertising 

Graybar Bi;ii.i>ing. New York 



DECEMBER 1947 



17 




costs 



Time $$potN as loi%' 



as |»20 and the Theatre 
Guild's top-draiver dramatic 
series at .*i^7,000 are available no^^ 



_^_^tkL From January 1948 on, TV 
•Hljiw^^ will be weighed in the sales 
^^^ balance by most advertising 
agencies and sponsors who use the 
medium. As a matter of record, in many 
cases it is being judged competitively 
now. This does not mean that adver- 
tisers are considering visual broadcasting 
solely on a cost-per-viewer basis. Tele- 
vision has other sales attributes besides 
the number of viewers. While the latter 
must be the keystone of video as an ad- 



vertising vehicle, agencies and sponsors 
do not discount the point-of-sale advan- 
tages that even the words "as][[seen on 
television" lend to a newly-introduced 
product, or a product requiring new sell- 
ing impetus. 

The Duane Jones purchase of 39 weeks 
of Missus Goes A'Shopping for three of its 
clients, Manhattan Soap, B. T. Babbitt, 
and C. F. Mueller, was not consummated 
on a test basis. The telecasts will have to 
deliver sales to justify the slightly under 



Time signals are attracting watch companies. John Ferguson started off the Theatre Guild's 
DuMont here scans a typical Longines spot Sunday night presentations of great dramas 



WK 


Ifl^^ 


m^^ 


^rlir^ 


h^ 


i^li 


tdj 


^v^^^^H^Pt^^L 


L ^ 






i9uS 





John Reed King takes "Missus Goes A-Shopping" and 



$1,000 per program which the sponsors 
are paying. This is true also of the 
fourth underwriter of the program, Co- 
bum Farm Products, which is represented 
by the Modem Merchandising Bureau 
(ad-agency). 

The less than $1,000 per telecast is 
lower than the average cost of a TV audi- 
ence participation program. On the basis 
of figures submitted by most stations on 
the air, presentations in this category 
average $1,450, and range from $1,100 to 
$2,000 per half-hour broadcast. The fact 
that Missus was purchased on a once-a- 
week basis for an entire year naturally 
made a maximum discount available to 
each of the four sponsors who present the 



18 



SPONSOR 







:HEE SE 1 JAR FISH 



SOMBDA 



MILK«"^EAM BUTTER EG 
PLEASESfRW-yOURSElf 



'■ JARC 



tri'''-?:'; 




nss&i* 




!(»-, 



I 



MUfUffiJ 



.£■£ 



1 






jgdU ^M^^y 



1 



r- T 



e ts cameras right to the point of sale for the weekly telecast of this audience participation airing. Big Ben giant market sales go up 30 per cent on T V day 



irs 
he 

au i 



Missus once every four weeks on a re- 
volving basis. 

Sponsors can use the visual air medium 
from as low as $20 per spot to $7,000 for 
an hour Theatre Guild dramatic scanning 
over WNBT (N. Y.). The latter is the 
most expensive television package pres' 
ently available for sponsorship. Remotes 
such as football, basketball, prize fights, 
hockey, and baseball usually cost less 
than studio shows because the cost of re- 
hearsal time in the aggregate is far higher 
than the fee for air time. It's also more 
reasonable to present a western film, as 
Chevrolet does over WABD (N. Y.), with 
just a live cowboy-commentator handling 
the introduction and commercials, than it 

DECEMBER 1947 



is to do a studio presentation. However, 
editing a film to fit time purchased, as 
well as to cut out the long shots and other 
poor video sequences, is an expense that 
must be figured when a regular theater- 
size motion picture film is rented for com- 
mercial presentation on the air. 

As an index to costs (time, talent, and 
studio time, if any) sponsor presents the 
following figures: 



Television Costs 
Program Type .\verage Cost* 

Audience Participa- 
tion (■ 2-hour) $1,450. 

Drama (hour) $3,875. 

Music (i/i-hour) $ 550. 

News (U-hour) $ .?75. 

Quiz ('4-hour) $1,115. 

.Special Events $1,500. 

-Sports, live (2-.?-hour) $1,050. 



Price Range* 

$1.100. -$2,000. 
$ 495. -$7,000. 
$ 380.-$ 7.50. 
$ 190.-$ 750. 
$ 450. -$2,000, 
$1.000.-$2.000, 
S .577.-$2,000. 



Sportscasts ('4-h(iur) 


S 


275, 


$ 


185. 


$ 400 


Spots (1-minute) 


$ 


47,75 


$ 


20. 


-$ 125. 


Time Spots (20- 












second) 


$ 


37.50 


$ 


20. 


-$ 80. 


Variety ('4 -hour) 


S 


.500. 


$ 


75. 


-$1 050. 


Weather Spots 












(20-(>0-second) 


s 


45. 


% 


20. 


-$ 80. 


Women's Interest 












( '4-hour) 


$ 


675. 


% 


80. 


-$1,00D. 



*riiese Ji'jnres are based upon a one-time lelecn.il. and 
discnunls {lime and Inlal dtlhr rolume) are nnl fiqnred 

Time costs have gone up recently on 
WNBT and WABD, in New York, 
WWJ-TV in Detroit, and KSD-TV in St. 
Louis. Transmitter-time fees (what 
they're calling T\^ time on the air at this 
writing) will continue to go up as home 
receivers continue to flow into markets. 
By the end of this month (December) 
{Please turn to page 39) 



HATIOWAL BftOADCASTiKi COMPAfPT. INU 

GEN€«AL UBRARY 
80 ROCKEF EILEH PLAZA, NEW YORK, N. V, 



Bankers' Mystery „.„ 



Iiriiadc^asting 



ami wliai iu i^x|mm*1 I'miii il are 



l4»ii;^-liiiie «|ii4v^iioii iiiarkN • • • 




spot 



Because banking remains a mystery to most oF the United States, the Land Title and Trust 
Company of Philadelphia tried television on WPTZ to explain some of its operations 



First National Bank (Portland, Oregon) put on a three-day show of Scotch thrift, "saving 
for what you want to buy," and broadcast the event over local station KALE. It paid off 




20 



Bankers have long memories. 
When broadcast advertising is 
discussed they automatically 
turn back the calendar to the great bank 
broadcasting fiasco of 1937. At that 
time a group of banks sponsored the 
Philadelphia Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Eugene Ormandy over NBC's 
Blue Network. The program was heard 
in 25 markets and worked itself down 
from an initial rating of 2. It was a 
classic case of the misuse of broadcasting 
as a public-opinion-forming medium. The 
music was highbrow, the commercials 
were Wall Street backslapping at its 
worst, and the ultra-conservative ultra- 
institutional selling rubbed everyone who 
heard the presentation the wrong way. 
Banks were not in the best repute in the 
late thirties and this series, with under- 
writers like New York's Chase and First 
National of Chicago, didn't help the 
banking cause at all. 

The idea had been promoted by a 
Chicagoan who sold it to a group of banks 
with which he had "connections." It re- 
flected bank thinking back in 1937. At 
that time 145 banks were on the air and 
only 59 of these had a good word to say 
for radio. There were 16,000 banks 
serving the United States in '37 just as 
there are today. What they wanted of 
advertising then was more confused than 
it is now . . . and it's still very foggy. 

In 1937 music, combined with family 
dramas of the horrible-example vintage, 
i.e., how the children starved because ma 
and pa hadn't put anything by for a 
rainy day, occupied 92.5 per cent of all 
bank time on the air. One and three- 
tenths per cent of all bank advertisers 
used spot announcements in 1937 as 
.igainst 35.6 per cent using them today. 

The Gothic-columns-in-marbled-halls 
type of banking structure is slowly but 
surel)' passing from the financial picture, 
physically as well as mentally. 

(Please turn to page 57) 

SPONSOR 



. . BEFORE 
you DECIDE ON 

1948 SCHEDULES 



tu 



DETROIT A. 



i4t IH& LxL- I IXV^I I ria^a 




MORE "^ 5^ 



iee Ucuu ^ft44cA Ixyil Jlv T HO44. aet an 



CKLW 



Located on, and bounded by Lake Erie, Lake Huron and the Detroit River, 
CKLW beams its 5,000 watt clear channel sisnal via the water route to a ten-million population area 
with a radio-homes and buying-power percentage second to none in America. The power of 5,000 
watts day and night. A middle-of-the-dial frequency of 800 kc. That, coupled with the lowest 
rate of any major station in this market, has made and continues to prove CKLW the Detroit Area's 
Number One radio buy. 

Guardian Bldg., Detroit 26 Adam •/. Younff, Jr., Inc., Sal' t Rep. 

J. E. Campeau, President H. -V. Stoi'in a Co., Canadian Rep. 



5,000 Watts Day and Night— 800 kc— Mutual Broadcasting System 



J 



DECEMBER 1947 *1 




over-all 



Ninety'eight per cent of 
America's families who drink 
coffee daily (and surveys indicate that 
91-94 percent of all U. S. A. families do), 
drink coffee with their breakfast. Never- 
theless, according to sponsor's cross- 
section findings, only 5 per cent of the 
nation's coffee roasters who use broad- 
casting employ the brisk morning air to 
purvey their product. 

Outstanding user of radio's rise-and- 
shine hour is J. A. Folger of San Fran- 
cisco. With a newscaster, Frank Heming- 
way, possessed of an inspired sense of 
humor and an ability to mimic front-page 
personalities, Folger has increased its 
sales 188 per cent during the past four 
years. During this period Folger spent 
75 cents out of every advertising dollar in 
radio, over the Don Lee Broadcasting 
System, and since January 1, 1947, over 
the Intermountain Network. 



In contrast to Folger, the nation's 
coffee roasters who used broadcasting 
(sampled by sponsor's industry cross- 
section) on the average spent 35 per cent 
of their sales-promotion budgets on the 
air to build brand loyalty. Brand loyalty 
is the primary objective of coffee pack- 
agers because, as leading coffee authori- 
ties admit, the layman can detect little if 
any difference in taste between mass 
coffees. 

Nationally there's no coffee that equals 
the combined sales of the leading local and 
regional brands. The national leaders are 
Eight O'clock (A&P) and Maxwell 
House. Leading regional brands include 
Hills, M. J. B., Butternut, Quaker, Del 
Monte, American Ace, Boscul, Folger's, 
La Touraine, Martinson's, Savarin, 
Nash's, Roundy's, and Beechnut. With 
the exception of M. J. B. and Beecltnut, 
all the regional leaders and most of the 



local and regional runners-up use broad- 
casting. 

Runner-up in national sales is Chase & 
Sanborn which is a consistent contender, 
although seldom a leader, in practically 
every market. Brand name recognition 
for C&S is unusually high but a high per- 
centage of respondents to surveys con- 
ducted b>' newspapers and independent 
research organizations recognized the 
C&S name but "had tried the brand but 
hadn't found the blend to their liking." 
It's understood that moves have been 
made by Standard Brands during the past 
year to correct this taste negative. Once 
this has been achieved the coffee industry 
generally believes C&S will take its place 
with the leaders. At present bulk sales to 
hotels and institutions keep up Chase & 
Sanborn volume. 

Local and regional coffees do not de- 
pend solely upon spot announcements to 
get across their ad-appeals. A little under 
23 per cent of the industry, as represented 
by sponsor's cross-section, use spots to 
the exclusion of all other forms of broad- 
casting. An equal percentage use spots 
in conjunction with programs of one form 
or another. More than half of all the 
coffee companies on the air use spot, 
regional, or network programs to the ex- 
clusion of spot announcements. News 
leads all other program types, with musi- 
cal and quiz presentations tying for 
second place. Serial dramas do not run 
anywhere near as high as might be ex- 
pected of sponsors who must depend upon 
women almost entirely to turn the desire 
to buy into actual sales. Only 4.7 per cent 
of coffee sponsors are using daytime 
serials. Included in this percentage, how- 
ever, are General Foods (Maxwell House) 
and Kroger Grocery and Baking Com- 
pany (Spotlight Coffee). 

Program t>pes used to sell coffee and 
the percentage of each type indicate that 
a great deal of the advertising is addressed 
to others than the housewife. 



Coffee Program Types 






Percentage 


Type 




of Total 


News 




26.0 


Music 




15.0 


Quiz 




15.0 


Partk-ipatind 




10.7 


Folk Musk- 




9.8 


Serials 




4.7 


Variety 




4.7 


Women's Parti*. 


ipaling 


4.7 


•Sports 




.«.o 


Farm 




l.h 


Musical Clock 




l.h 


Time SiUnals 




l.h 


Mkt & Weather 


Reports 


I.b 



There was a time when food advertisers 
(and that includes coffee roasters) fought 
for availabilities on Thursday and Friday 
evenings with the idea that the ghost 
walks on Saturdays and that's the day in 



2S 



SPONSOR 



i)i!)J;Li;j£)jJjj 

COFFEE 'TEA 




Taste js tAeTest 



Kate Smith (Mutual cooperative prosram) is 
widely promoted by Old Mansion CoFFee 



which the housewife spends the greater 
part of her funds for food. 

That is not true today, for although 
more coffee is bought on Saturday than 
any other one day in the week, the coffee 
sales on that day are less than 26 per cent 
of the weekly total. Coffee is sold every 
day in the week, no day producing an out' 
standing proportion of its sales. In a 
Transitads Survey housewives indicated 
that they bought their coffee on the 
following days: 

Coffee Buying by Days 
Percentage 
Day of Buying 

Monday 18.7% 



THE TIIEIVD \S TO THE 
4|i AKEIl IILE.MI! 



FOR All ) ^^J^l^.t'o"""**' I 
[(OMESHNTM 1^ V pT' ' 




ISPLRV Rll THREE CRIRD! 

d completely sotisly all customer 






I RISPLI 

I ond rorr 






\o rii.\iif.K HMi m:iivi<>: iiei.iverv 



Regional 
air-ads a 



brands 


of coffee feature their 


s Lee & 


Cady do with Quaker 


Tuesday 


14.5% 


Wednesday 


11.7% 


Thursday 


12.6% 


Friday 


15.6% 


Saturday 


25.8% 


Sunday 


1.1% 




Sunday's Charlie McCarthy program 
seems to have stimulated Monday coffee 
buying to a slight degree but most mer- 
chandisers attribute the higher Monday 
purchases to the fact that the supply is a 
little likelier to run out on the weekend. 

The fact that coffee buying is not re- 
stricted to any one day in the week 
accounts for the fact that 26.7 per cent of 
sponsor's sample of coffee advertisers use 



Forbes Food Store Quiz travels the KXQK 
territory and wins special store displays 



across-the-board (Monday through Fri- 
day) broadcasting. Fifty-seven and six- 
tenths per cent of the users of programs 
air them daily. Another reason given for 
the daily use of the medium is that since 
coffee is sold on a reminder basis it's 
necessary to keep hitting the consumer 
with the current slogan. 

Slogans are high in favor with coffee 
ad-men and they use them at the drop of 
a hat — because they've found that they 
sell. They credit Maxwell House's "Good 
to the last drop," "A cup of JFG ... is a 
cup of GOOD coffee," Chase & Sanborn's 
"shade grown flavor," Folger's "When I 
(Please turn to page 40) 



Chase & Sanborn's Charlie McCarthy achieved 
an all-time top when W. C. Fields visited 




Folger's air-offers like ball-point pens drew 
nearly a half-million labels this past summer 



FREE *TAKE ONE! 



REGAL BALL-POINT PEN 

from FOLGER 

FOR STUDENTS AND 
CHILDREN . . . MEN 

Thii omoziog 

pen ;s AIL 

M£TAL precriion 

ode — w I t S 

ooth-writing treel 

boll point Hondy oi 

a pencil - . fill pocke) 

Of purse Eoiy lo use 

t just gtidet ocroii paper, 

driei OS it writes Wnles on 

ony moteriol. Unusuol GUAR 

ANTEE! Eosy to own if you use 

FOLGER S COFFEE Get wverol 

Regol BollPoint Pens TODAY! 



SEND FOR SEVERAL TODAY! 



"We the People" hit new heights for Sanka 
when Gabe Heatter had this giant as his guest 




' FOlCEt S COfFCC. So., frc 
I PI«OM i»n4 mm 



.KO J Col.lo-n.o 
_»ECll lAll raiNT PINS I 
. •nclOM 33 C»nt« ond 0«i« lob«l from a lOr e4 fOlGtt i 

' cornt — •.<• unwindina b«T<d I'om o lix a< roicn s 

I COMIC •o' oock p«i 

1 NAMI iriMU r.inl)_ . . 




spot 
trends 



Bdsed upon number oF spots (prosrams and an- 
nouncements) placed each month by all spon- 
sors indexed by Rorabaugh Report on Spot 
Radio Advertising. Spots indexed during Sep- 
tember are used as a base and charted as 100 



Spot business was up in October 2.9 points over September despite the 
(act that the trend was down in a number of industry classifications. 
Food, reflecting the grain and meat markets, was off 1.2. Sponsor's 
miscellaneous classification, which includes farm products, motion pic- 
tures, coal, men's clothing, etc., was off 27.0. Greatest drop (59.38 
points) was in the tobacco group because a number of campaigns con- 
cluded during the month. Soaps-cleansers-toiletries held its own de- 
spite gloom in the cosmetic business. Biggest gain was in the beverage- 
confectionery index which jumped 90.2 points due to Coca-Cola's return 
to the local program field over 245 stations. Three out of five sections 
in the country showed an increase in spot placement. The South 
was off 7.6 and New England off 2.8 points. 



1947-48 


AUG SEP 1 OCT 1 NOV DEC 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 


JUL 1 


250 
200 
150 
100 
50 


Based 


upon ref 


jorfs frorr 


274* S 


ponsors 




— 




















NATIONAL TREND 






1 1 1 1 1 







Trends 


by Geo 


graphical A 


reas 






1947-48 


AUG SEP|OCT|NOV|0EC jJANjFEB |MAR 


APR 


MAr 


JUN 


JUL ( 


250 — 


2,280,OOQ radio familiei 

1 1 1 1 














2O0 — 


























150 — 


























— ■• 


























100— 
50— 


















_ 
















New England 
















250— 


9,166,000 ro 

1 


dio fa 


mille 


s 














200— 


























150 — 


























100 — 
50 — 










































Middle Atlantic 
















250— 


11,387,000 radio families ' 

1,11 














200— 


























150 — 




























50 — 


















Mid-Western 














250— 


6,399,000 radio families 

t 1 1 1 1 














200 — 


























150 — 


























100 — 




























50 — 










South 






em 
















250 — 


4,766,000 radio fomilie 

1 1 1 1 


i 














200 — 


























150 — 


























100 — 
50 — 


































o^^:r.^ nn.,4 1 




R 


ock' 


^Mc 


W!ti 


ain 







Trends by Industry Clcssi 


Rcotions 






1947-48' AUr. SEpIoCT [nOv| DEC 1 JAnI FEB 1 MAR. APR 1 A*At|jun| JUl ' 


250— 
200— 
150— 
100— 
50 — 


95 J 


>pons 


ors R( 


•porting 


















Food 






250— 

aoo^ 

150^; 

100 — 

50 — 


23 5 


>pons 


orj R< 


tporti 


ng 


















Beverages and 
Confectionery 


250— 
200— 
150— 
100— 
50— 


50 
17 


Spons 


ors R 


eporl 


"9 
























;>oaDs. Cleansers 
ond Toiletries 


250— 
200— 
MO— 
100 — 
50 — 


Sponi 


ors R 


eport 


ng 






■ 














1 


Jpi L*liil*lik!/.^S 


II' 


250— 
200— 
150— 
100— 
50— 


6 Spons 


ors R< 


iporl! 


ng 
























Tobacco 






250— 
200— 
150— 
100— 
50— 


12 


Spon 


ors R 


eport 


ng 


















Drugs 




, 




1 


250—' 
200 — 
150— 
100— 
50 — 




71 S 


pons 


srs Re 


porli 


ng 


















Miscello 






neous 


















1 



'For this total a sponsor is regarded as a single corporate entity no matter how 
many diverse divisions it may include. In Itie industry reports, fiowever, ttie some 
sponsor may be reported under a number of classifications. 



24 



SPONSOR 




100,000 VISITORS YEARLY SET NEW 
ATTENDANCE RECORD FOR WFBR! 

Advertisers get huge "PLUS" 
from word-of-mouth praises! 

Every weekday — week in, week out — crowds of eager Balti- 
moreans flock to WFBR (more people yearly than live in 
Savannah, Georgia). These 100,000 people from all walks 
of life come to W F B R to see broadcasts, visit modern studios, 
look at highly merchandised product displays and receive a copy 
of "Let's Listen" — W F B R's chatty, informative house organ and 
program highlight guide. They leave with heightened interest in 
all WFBR programs. 

The hundred thousand represent, at no extra cost to you, an 
intensive loyalty factor that can't be duplicated in Baltimore 
radio. They're the reason we're known as . . . 



I 




OR 



ABC BASIC NETWORK • 5000 WATTS IN B ALTI M O R E, M D. 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 

DECEMBER 1947 25 






"? 



^^^w^ 




'^niQ 



« 




WORK FOR A COMIC 




How many childien have been born in the United States since 1920 — the year modern 
radio came into being? A statistician could arrive at some figure, but the interesting point 
here is that there are millions of boys and girls of school age and men and women in 
their 20's who HAVE NEVER known a world without radio. 

How best to reach these young people to tell them something of the exciting historv of radio and how 
a network program gets on the air? NBC decided the most effective way was a comic l)ook.. Comic 
books are as modern as radio— they have grown up in the same era in which radio developed. 

NBC is the first radio network to use this popular technique to tell how radio works ... all radio. 
With the first printing of 1,250,000 copies, NBC's comic l)ook, ON THE AIR. will reach 
into homes, schools and institutions throughout the nation, telling its story of American radio 
operating under the system of free enterprise. 

Here is the first major promotion piece devised by a radio network to appeal to the younger people 
of the nation — a vast majority of today's listening audience and tomorrow's potential consumers. 




AMERICA'S NO. 1 NETWORK 



. . the National Broadcasting Company 



A service of Radio 
■Corporation of \inerira 



Tlio ilil'fori*ni*o botwooii 

B "WS "TOP 




and 



ttfl/M^J^ What Nielsen's newly-re' 
\2^^^n^ leased* "Top Twenty" means 
" ' is that in the sampled area, 
these 20 programs have the biggest audi- 
ences. As released by the Columbia 
Broadcasting System, his figures also pur- 
port to indicate the programs that deliver 
the biggest audiences per advertising dol- 
lar. This "number of listeners per adver- 
tising dollar" is based on figures from the 
best available sources on network time 
cost plus the cost of the program. 

Nielsen reports that his 1,400 audi- 
meters measure 63 per cent of the 
35,000,000-plus radio homes of the nation 
Audimeters (measuring devices attached 
to radio receivers in homes) are installed 
in the Nielsen areas as indicated on the 
map on this page. The 1,400 measuring 
devices in actual practice are cut down to 
1,260, since 10 per cent of the tapes from 
the audimeters are not usable. This 
means the audience in 22,050,000 homes 
(63 per cent of the U. S. A.) is measured 
by 1,260 audimeters. These audimeter 

*To the trade press, consumer, and nonsubscriber. 

{Please turn to page 59) 



I TOI» TWEIVT¥ 




• (October 5-1 1 


,1947) 






Average 






Audience 


Homes 


Program 


Ratings 


Per$ 


1. Lux Radio Theater* 


23.1 


301 


2. McGee & Molly* 


19.7 


322 


3. Bob Hope* 


18.1 


236 


1 4. Amos 'n' Andy* 


17.9 


285 


1 5. Mr. District Attorney 17.7 


428 


6. My Friend Irma* 


17.5 


459 


7. Aldrich Family 


16.5 


N.D. 


8. Screen Guild* 


16.0 


N.D. 


1 9. Red Skelton* 


15.9 


301 


! 10. Charlie McCarthy* 


15.2 


208 


11. Life of Riley 


15.0 


353 


12. Jack Benny* 


15.0 


214 


13. E\% Town 


14.9 


497 


14. Truth or Conseq 


14.6 


317 


15. Burns and Allen 


14.5 


262 


16. Talent Scouts 


14.4 


443 


17. Lone Ranger 


14.4 


878 


18. Fred Allen* 


14.1 


N.D. 


19. Inner Sanctum 


13.9 


449 


20. Kraft Music Hall 


13.9 


319 


*Theje programs were surveyed by 


Nielsen 


and Hooper on the same n 


ights. 








?t1 ff 





I 



?? 




H The 36 Hooper Survey Cities 
Areas Covered by Nielsen 



<■ J inJnlri thii ih- — — ~ i— ■ 



ffl^HJf 



Hooperatings are popularity 
indices, not circulation re- 
ports. Hooper's "First Fif- 
teen" is a rank order tabulation of the top 
programs telephone-checl<ed in 36 cities 
in the U. S. These 36 cities have been 
selected because theoretically they have 
equal service from each of the four net- 
works, i.e., the four networks can be 
heard with equal clarity in them. 

Hooperatings indicate the popularity of 
programs in urban telephone homes only. 
The phone homes in each area are checked 
on a random basis without thought as to 
stratification (education, income, family 
size, etc.). The interviewer takes one 
name after another from the phone books 
in her area and checks programs the last 
13 minutes out of every 15. Checking a 
15-minute program broadcast in all 
Hooper cities, interviewers make 735 
calls. For a half-hour program 1,470 
calls are attempted, for a one-hour pro- 
gram 2,940 calls. With these calls 
Hooper attempts to report upon the popu- 
larity preferences of the 29,085,542 
(Please turn to page 60) 



FIIC^iT FiFTKE> 


1 


(October 1-7, 1947) 




Program 


Rating 


1. Bob Hope* 


23.0 


2. Fibber McGee and Molly* 


23.0 


3. Lux Radio Theater* 


21.6 


4. Jack Benny* 


20.6 


5. Amos 'n' Andy* 


19.8 


6. RedSkelton* 


19.2 


7. AlJolson 


18.8 


8. Charlie McCarthy* 


17.9 


9. Walter Winchell 


17.8 


10. Mr. District Attorney 


17.5 


11. Fred Allen* 


16.9 


12. Screen Guild* 


16.7 


13. Bandwagon 


16.5 


14. Bing Crosby 


15.8 


15. Great Gildersleeve 


14.7 


not released i 




16. My Friend Irma* 


14.2 


17. Truth or Consequences 


13.9 


18. Jack Carson-Eve Arden 


13.7 


19. Duffy's Tavern 


13.6 


20. Take It or Leave It 


13.0 



*These programs were surveyed by Hooper 
and Nielsen on the same nights. 




The best from Tin Pan Alley, Hollywood 
and the Classics by the Superb 
Sixteen^ Voiced SERENADERS 



Now yon rail sponsor the siii<;iii« ^roiip with 
the longest eoiilinuous record on the air of 
any vocal organization . . . almost 600 hroad- 
casts over CBS. Every member is a star in his 
own right with a background of top-show 
participation. 

Seventy-eight separate fifteen-minute episodes 
are available, each a program gem directed by 




Kmilc iUile and with barren Sweeney of New- 
York Philharmonic fame acting as commen- 
tator and musical host. Opening, inside, and 
closing commercials. 

No finer musical talent of its type exists today. 
>XINGS OF SONG is a program series with 
tremendous popular appeal, made possible by 
the skillful selection of diversified musical 
numbers. 

Write for audition disc, details 
on special commercials by Mr. 
Cote and Mr. Sweeney, and 
other facts. 




TRANSCRIPTION SALES, I 



New York— 47 West 5Sth St., New York 22. N. Y.. Col. 5-1-544 



6381 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood 28. Calif., Hof oj| 




An outstanding High-Hooper Show with 
the famous MULLEN SISTERS and 
CHARLIE MAGN ANTE'S Orchestra 



There is only one Singin' Sam and what a selling job 
he has done for scores of sponsors . . . and can do for 
you. Singin' Sam sells because he gets the ratings and 
gets the response. 



AMERICA'S 

GREATEST RADIO 

SALESMAN 



wow Omaha 

WTAM Cleveland 

CKEY Toronto 

CJAD Montreal 



18.1 at 6:30 P.M. 
12.4 at 6:00 P.M. 
12.9 at 7:30 P.M. 
14.8 at 7:30 P.M. 



And according to the Conlan survey, the percentage of 
tune-in at WISH in Indianapolis was doubled in first 
three months on the air . . . 14.6 to 30.4. 

Yes, Sam is doing a spectacular job. His fifteen minute 
shows have been heard on over 200 stations for scores of 
sponsors. 

Write for audition disc and full details on special com' 
mercials by Sam, availabilities, etc. 




117 W. High St.. Springfield, Ohio 
Telephone 2-4974 

N. Michigan Ave.. Chicago, 111., Superior 3053 



Transcription Sales, Inc. 
117 West High Street 
Springfield, Ohio 

Please send me complete data on 
D Singin' Sam 
n Wings of Song 

Name 

Company 

Street 

City State. 



Coiites^ts and Offers 



PROGRAM 



a SPO.\.M»n monthly tabulation 



AMERICAN OIL CO. 



B. T. BABBITT CO. 



BARTEL-S. INC. 
NANCY CARROL STUDIOS 



COLGATE-PALMOLIVE. 
PEET CO. 



DHECTIVE BOOK CLUB 



DUFFY-MOTT CO. 



EVERSHARP. INC. 



FARR CANDY CO. 



flas, oil, 
tiros 

Bab-0 

.\pplianccs 



Photographs 



Colgate 
Toothpaste 



Books 



Mott's Apple 
Juice 



Injector 
Razors 



Ice cream, 
confectionery 



Professor 
Quiz 



David 
Harum 



Let's Pop the 
Question (T\0 



Call the 
Tune 



Can You 
Top This? 



Weird 
Circle 



Morning 
Matinee 

Take It or 
Leave It 



Hcnrv Morgan 
Show 



Farr's 
Fone Quiz 



Saturday 
10-10:30 pin 



MTWTF 
10:45-11 am 



Sunday 
8:30-9 pm 



TTh 
6:15-6:30 pm 



Saturday 
8:30-9 pm 



Monday 
10:30-11 pm 



• TTS 
8:30-9 pm 



Sunday 
10-10:30 pm 

Wednesday 
10:30-1 1 pm 



MWF 
12:45-1 pm 



$50 cash 



Booklet: "Farm Sanitation" 



Best-seller books 



Color photo; black-and-white photo; 
wallet-size photo 



Cash 



prizes and "Can You Top This" 
gag book 



Mystery novel: "Case of the Fan 
Dancer's Horse" 



Stainless steel 49c paring knife 



$15,000 home and $2,500 for lot; 1947 

Buick; furs; R(".\ video sets; tires; 

watches; radios; etc. 



Quart of ice cream 



Complrtp in up to 25 words sentence about 

Amoco praluet 'different weekly). Winner 

gets $25 plus $23 if he included 5 acceptable 

questions and answers for use on program 



Request to Lycons, c/o local station 



Listeners telephone studio with answers to 
questions on program 



Guess correct title of one, two, or three tunes 
played on show 



Prizes if joke sent to program is used 



Free for card or letter to sponsor, WJZ 



Send 25c and Mott's Apple Juice bottletop to 
sponsor, WLW 



Complete in up to 25 words "I like Eversharp- 

Schick Injector Razors because . . .," send to 

contest, New York, with instruction sheet from 

razor box 



ABC 



CBS 



WFIL-TV. 

Phik. 

WEEK. 
Peoria 



XBC 



WJZ. 
New York 



WLW, 
Cinci. 



Correct answer to quis questions asked over 
telephone 



NBC 
.ABC 



KID, 
Idaho Falls 



GENERAL FOODS CORP. 



La France 
Bluing Flakes 



Second 
Mrs. Burton 



MTWTF 
2-2:15 pm 



$2,500 diamond ring, other diamonds, 
gift boxes 



Tell neighbor reason for using La Ft'ance. Mail 

copy with neighbor's and grocer's address, 

boxtop, to sponsor. Battle Creek 



CBS 



GENERAL MILLS 



Bisquick, 

Cold Medal 

Flour, 

Cheerios, 

Wheaties 



Betty Crocker 

Magazine of 

the Air 



MTWTF 
10:25-10:45 am 



Jubilee Baking Recipes 



Request to sponsor, Minneapolis 



Jack 
Armstrong 



MWF or TTh 
5:30-6 pm 
(alternates 
Sky King) 



ABC 



1,112 .\dmiral radio-phonos, value 
$111,700 



Send name for a radio with Wheaties boxtop 
to program, Minneapolis 



Woman in 
White 



MTWTF 
2:15-2:27 pm 



Syrup server set with cork base plate 



Send 50c and Bisquick boxtop to sponsor, 
Minneapolis 



NBC 



H. P. HOOD & SONS 



Milk, dairy 
products 



.\mong Us 
Girt 



MTWTF 
8:15-8:30 am 



Ladies' Waltham watch weekly 



Best household suggestion sent in by listener 



WLAW, 

Lawrence, 

Mass. 



KELLOGG CO. 



Cereals 



Superman 



MTWTF 
5:15-5:30 pm 



"Gy-Rocket" aerial toy 



Send 15c and Pep boxtop to sponsor. Battle 
Creek 



MBS 



LA TOURAINE COFFEE CO. 



Coffee 



Melody 
Mail Qui 



MWF 
8:45-9 am 



Cory Glass Coffee Maker; nylon hose; 
coffee 



Submit product slogan, song title, and local 

grocer's address. If song not known, sender 

gets Corj- set. Otherwise nylons. Coffee to 

honorable mentions 



WBZ, 

Boston; 

WBZA, 

Springfield 



MANHATTAN SOAP CO. 



.Sweetheart 
.Soap 



MARS INC. 



Candy 



Rose of My 
Dreams 



MTWTF 
2:45-3 pm 



Evelyn 
Winters 



MTWTF 
10:30-10:45 am 



Purchase price of 3 bars Sweetheart 
Soap refunded 



Write sponsor why like or dislike product. In 
either case, money refunded 



CBS 



Curtain 
Time 



Saturday 
7:30-8 pm 



Dr. I. Q. 



Monday 
9:30-10 pm 



First prize: $1,000; second prize: $200; 
eight prizes: $25; etc. 



Word-building contest from product sentence. 

Six weekly contests. Mail entries with two 

Mars wrappers to sponsor 



NBC 



Weekly award of $100 



Best set of six right-and-wrong statements 

mailed to program, Chi., with two Mars 

WTappers 



METROPOLITAN LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 



Insurance 



Eric Sevareid, 
News 



MTWTF 
6-6:15 pm 



Health booklets 



Free on request to program, c/o local station 



CBS 



PARTICIPATING 



Various 



Three .\larm 



MTWTF 
1-2 pm 



1948 Ford Sedan; home furnishings; 
tickets; heaters; etc. 



Write letter to show, re "I want that Ford . 
etc." Also, daily quiz questions 



KILM, 

Eureka, 
Calif. 



PARTICIPATING (GEN'L 
FOODS. COLGATE, ETC.) 



Various 



Beulah 
Karney 



MTWTF 
4:45-5 pm 



Booklet: Heirloom Holiday Recipes 



Send 10c to program, WENR 



WENR, 
Chi. 



PROCTER & GAMBLE 



Crisco, 
Ivory Snow 



Welcome 
Traveler 



MTWTF 
I'2-12:30 pm 



Booklet: "Recipes for Good Eating" 



Send 10c and Crisco label to sponaor, Cinci. 



ABC 



Drene 



Ma Perkins 



MTWTF 
3:15-3:30 pm 



Contest prizes of $10,000; $1,000; 

(280) $50. Also concurrent dealer 

contest, $2,000 in prizes 



Listeners complete product sentence in con- 
sumer contest, on blanks from dealers. Dealer 
contest judged on photos of Drene store displa>'S 



CBS 
NBC 



RONSON ART METAL 
WORKS 



WILLIAMSON CANDY 



Lighters 



Twenty 
Questions 



Saturday 
8-8:30 pm 



Lighter to sender of subject used; if 

studio contestants stumped, grand 

prize of silver table lighter, matching 

cigarette urn, tray 



Send subject about which 20 questions may be 
asked, to program 



MBS 



Oh Henry 



Detective 
Mysteries 



Sunday 
4:30-5 pm 



$100 reward from "True Detective 
M}-steries" Magazine 



Notify FBI and magazine of information lead- 
ing to arrest of criminal named on broadcast 



MBS 



YAKIMA DAIRYMEN-S ASSN. 



.Milk, dairy 

producbs 



Date at Eight 



Various dairj- products 



Listeners guess names of tunes, identity of 
objects in two daily telephone quizzes 



KIMA. 

Yakima, 

Wash. 




32 



SPONSOR 




^ouidaMLrm. achieooment 

IN PADIO 

XL STATIONS 

PACIFIC NORTMWEST BROADCASTERS 

FOR 

OVER -ALL PROMOTION 
REGIONAL NETWORKS 




WrUc for our omphtc MARKETIPS 

PICIFIC NORTHWEST BROADCASTERS 



OFFICES 

Box 1956— Butte, Montana 

Sermons Building— Spokone, Wash. 

Otpheum 3ldg — Portland, Oregon 

6381 Hollywood Bl.'d— Hollywood 28 

79 Post St —Son Froncisco 4 

TKe Walker Co., 15 W. lOth St, Kansas City 

The Wolker Co , 360 N. Mich , Chicago 

The Walker Co , 551 5th Ave , New York 

The Wolker Co., 330 Henn. A.e., Minneopolis 



THi 



€1 




'HOME TOWN" 



STATIONS 



MERCHANDISABLE AREA 
BONUS LISTENING AREA 
SERVING 2/2 MILLION PEOPLE 



fr':a?KJi':^ajSr%?i-fe<^i^;.^v;fca^^^ 



DECEMBER 1947 



33 





The 

Picked Panel 
answers 
Mr. Planter 



Every year, 
sometimes more 
frequently, ques- 
tions come to an 
advertiser's mind 
and he naturally 
turns to his agency 
for an answer. 
Sometimes these 
questions are fa- 
miliar to us . 
Sometimes they are brand new. But, old 
or new, we approach every question with 
the obligation that the answer should be 
as complete and accurate as our facilities 
make possible. 

We were one of the first agencies to 
offer radio as an advertising medium to 
our clients. As this medium has de- 
velop>ed our services have expanded. In 
addition to our regular program depart- 
ment which covers production, script 
editing, timebuying, client contact, and 
sales, we maintain a radio commercial 
copy department, a radio research de- 
partment, and a radio publicity and pro- 
motion department. The activities of 
each of these groups come under the 
supervision of its department head and 
our radio planning board. 

There are many services which our 
clients expect and get through these ex- 
tensive facilities at BBD&O. In handling 
1 1 network programs and a great amount 
of spot radio we keep up with the ever- 
changing radio picture and feel that we are 
we]!-equipp>ed to render the many services 



Mr. Sponsor Asks... j 

"What should a radio advertiser expect in the 
way of service from the radio department of 
lii.s advertising agency?" 

i , . Id I Advertising Manager 

Adrian J. Hanter | BenruiWstch Co., Inc. 




which an advertiser expects from an 

agency. 

Arthur Pryor, Jr. 
Vp in Charge of Radio 
BBD&O, New York 



If I owned a 
railroad I would 
not employ en- 
gineers and expect 
them to be ticket 
sellers, switchmen, 
brakemen, con- 
ductors, or do any 
thing other than 
the special job for 
which I had hired 
them. (True, perhaps they could do 
these other jobs in an emergency, which 
would be an advantage.) 

By the same token, if I employed a 
major advertising agency to handle my 
advertising . . . from the radio department 
I would expect: programing. Period! 

In most major agencies today, the other 
highly specialized and skilled work can be 
done far better by the separate depart- 
ments, such as publicity, promotion, re- 
search, and merchandising. By the use 
of the agency's entire facilities, I would 
expect my advertising to produce its best 
results. Therefore, I definitely say a 
radio department's chief function is pro- 
graming. If the radio department has 
some knowledge of these other jobs and 
can be useful in those directions too, that 
is all to the good. 

Advertising coordination usually comes 
through an account executive whose close 
client contact keeps him aware of all 
policy matters. And the account execu- 
tive supervises all the required radio 
service functions, because naturally there 
must be close cooperation in all of these 
departmental jobs. But none should 
overshadow the main advertising objec- 
tive — a good program, whether it be net- 
work, spot, or whatever, so geared that it 



gives the advertiser the maximum audi- 
ence among his truly potential customers. 
By way of postscript, another reading 
of Mr. Planter's question leads me to 
suspect he's suggesting that many func- 
tions besides programing should be encom- 
passed in the magical 15 per cent dis- 
count. If that is so, 3,000 words instead 
of 300 are necessary to give him his 
answer . . . unless it suffices to say that 
agency net profit (and particularly from 
radio) is inordinately low. 

Blayne Butcher 
Radio director 
Newell'Emmett, N. Y. 



1 think that a 
client has every 
right to expect 
from his advertis- 
ing agency's radio 
department a com- 
plete service as to 
the planning and 
execution of all 
radioactivities. As 
background for the 
planning, the radio department should be 
expected to keep itself informed on the 
over-all radio picture — that is, current 
shows, available talent, talent trends, the 
status and standing of networks and sta- 
tions, the listening habits and preferences 
of the public as to day-of-week, types of 
shows, etc. 

In connection with the execution of 
radio plans, a radio department should be 
expected to be equipped to carry out com- 
pletely such radio plans as are made; 
specifically such things as the buying of 
time, handling of any and all contractual 
negotiations for radio time and their 
subsequent problems, the building and or 
buying of shows, bu>ing of talent, and the 
handling of any talent problems, con- 
tractual or otherwise, the writing of com- 
mercials, and the actual direction of 
shows — and by shows I mean everything 




34 



SPONSOR 



from minute spots to one-hour programs. 

All these things should be handled by 
the agency, although they may not all be 
the actual work of the agency. The writ- 
ing of scripts, arranging of music, direct- 
ing of shows, etc., are highly specialized 
creative functions, and it is neither rea- 
sonable nor practicable to expect adver- 
tising agencies to have such specialized 
creative talent on staff and available at a 
moment's notice. I say it isn't reason- 
able, because it isn't economical. For 
example . . . suppose a dramatic script 
writer were hired on a staff basis, out of 
every 12 months he might well be needed 
for only three. Further, it isn't practic- 
able to do this, even if it were economical, 
because the best creative talent in radio 
remains free lance. 

Going beyond radio, clients have a 
right also to expect their agency's radio 
department to be knowledgeable in such 
other fields as promotion, publicity, re- 
search, merchandising, and so forth, so 
that in working out radio plans and ideas 
these other phases of advertising can be 
properly related. 

Radio departments should know how 
to use research data, where to find re- 
search facts, where research can help out 
on a problem, and how to go intelligently 
to research people for help. Radio men 
should be broadly informed, and be able 
to cooperate with other departments. 

But — and here's my point. As I see it, 
all these other non-radio functions are 
specialized, and should be handled by 
specialists. The radio department should 
not be expected to take over research, 
promotion, or other phases of advertising 
activity, however closely allied with a 
given radio effort they might be. 

Following this line of thought, even in 
those cases where radio constitutes the 
major part of an advertising effort, I don't 
think the radio department should dom- 
inate or dictate advertising policies in 
other directions although it goes without 
saying that they may profitably be con- 
sulted concerning them. 

Thus in all cases the G. H. Q. of the 
advertising campaign should still be the 
account executive, the plans board, or 
some such central group responsible for 
the over-all well-being of the account, 
whose job it is to get the best possible 
advertising, whether this be in radio, 
printed media, outdoor, etc. Only in this 
way can the picture be seen in its proper 
balance, and the work of the various 
specialists in the related fields be properly 
utilized. 

Francis C. Barton, Jr. 

Vp, director of radio 

Federal Advertising Agency, N. Y. 

DECEMBER 1947 



THEY lOOK UP TO... 




\^ It doesn't show up in media data, but cer- 
tainly prestige is important in selecting a radio 
station. No doubt prestige does influence many 
advertisers in choosing WFBM. Around Indian- 
apolis people are looking up to WFBM — have been 
for twenty-two years! WFBM won itself a faithful 
audience as a radio pioneer — the first station in 
the state. And WFBM's been building its audience 
and building its prestige with both listeners and 
advertisers ever since! 



Incidentally, WFBM's audience is faithful 
(as we said). If you'll do a little "Hooperoot- 
ing," you'll notice that WFBM is consistently 
rated first in Indianapolis in over-all listen- 
ing audience — day and night the year 'round. 




BASIC AFFILIATE: Colombia Broadcasting System 
Represented Nationally by The Katz Agency 



35 



-g - t n«j.. 



Symbol of Thoughtful Giving 




•dual lilt— dnisncd lot SPONSOR by Howvd Wcchilw 



Among those you want to remember this Christmas 
are some who seek a better understanding 

of broadcast advertising. They may be 
sponsors, prospective sponsors, advertising 

agency executives, or your own associates. For such 
we offer a unique gift . . . twelve consecutive 

monthly issues of the one magazine designed 
100% for buyers of broadcast advertising. 
The handsome gift card reproduced 
above acknowledges 
your thoughtfulness. 




for Buyers of Broadcast Advertising 



36 



SPECIAL GIFT RATES: 25 subscriptions or more, $3 «ach/ 15-24, $3.50; 5-14, $4; 2-4, $4.50; One, $5. 

SPONSOR 




1 AO/< Mary Lee Taylor broadcast her Pet Milk program direct from the sponsor's 
M.«9*9'^ test kitchen over St. Louis' KMOX. The novelty plus sound effects produced 



over-afi 



Home economics programs, 
conceived in the test kitchens 
of radio stations, advertising agencies, and 
advertisers in the late twenties and early 
thirties, have during the current decade 
almost passed from the commercial broad- 
cast scene. The duo that remain in net- 
work radio, Mary Lee Taylor and Betty 
Crocker, like their few local contempor' 
aries in Oklahoma City, Chicago, and 
points north, east, south, and west, have 
continued to gather sizable audiences. 
That's because they have been able to 
keep up with the times. Although they're 
all in part based upon the skillet-and- 
saucepan approach, they're no longer Lily 
Tish'ish. They've added entertainment 
to the information they bring to the 
microphone. 

Everything from quiz to drama and 
name guest stars is currently found on a 
home economics program. Sponsors have 
discovered that kitchen personalities and 
a mike with the rattle of pots and pans 
offstage do not make a 1947 program. 
Not only must the authority be able to 
talk to her listeners as though she were in 
the same room and a personal friend but 
she must be a modem, not a hoover- 
aproned relic. 

When radio was young and sponsors 
were tyros in the field of broadcast adver- 
tising, almost all major food advertisers 
took a fling at selling the housewife via 
the cookery routine. There were Pills- 
bury's Kitchen Closeups and R. B. Davis' 
Mystery Chef on CBS. Borden had Jane 
Ellison's Magic Recipes and Kraft Mrs. 
Goudiss Forecast School of Cooking on 
NBC. General Mills started Betty 
Crocker on WCCO, Minneapolis, and 
moved it to NBC in 1927. Pet Milk came 
to the air with Mary Lee Taylor in the fall 
of 1933, spending $26,400 of its $358,600 
1933 advertising budget for the program. 

DECEMBER 1947 



Since then, only Betty Crocker and 
Mary Lee Taylor have continued nation- 
ally to deliver radio-inspired sales for 
their sponsors. Most local test kitchens 
in radio stations have since removed the 
white tile and ancient Kelvinators. 

Home economics sessions reached their 
zenith in the field of multiple sponsors. 
It's a simple matter to "sell" a number of 
food items as the air instructor tells the 
housewife what to do with them. Never- 
theless most advertisers have found other 
participating programs (women's gossip, 
news, disk jockey sessions, quiz, breakfast 
club, Mr. and Mrs., and musical clock 
broadcasts) deliver at a lower cost per 
listener. 

Betty Crocker is General Mills' house- 
name. There have been as many as 20 
Crockers on the air at one time, either 
regionally or locally. She's never photo- 
graphed and when the picture of her 
appears in advertisements it's a piece of 
"art." As the years have gone on, she 
has been modernized and never permitted 
to become dowdy. 

Mary Lee Taylor is the Pet Milk house 
name. Unlike Betty Crocker, Miss Tay- 
lor has been one person on the air down 
through the years, Mrs. Susan Cost of St. 
Louis. Amazing though it may seem 
Mrs. Cost looks younger, more vivacious 
today than she did in November 1933 
when she appeared before the KMOX 
microphone and broadcast for the first 
time as Mary Lee Taylor. The secret of 
the program's success is that just as Mrs. 
Cost appears (in her pictures) to have 
grown younger with the years so has the 
script discarded the stuffy, stilted verbi- 
age of years ago for the simple down-to- 
earth dialogue of today. 

Typical of the 1933 continuity is John 
Cole's "Pardon me if I seem to speak 
indistinctly — my mouth is watering." 



What 

Keeps 

a Home 

Economies 

Program 

Alive? 



■m O/l "y Mary Lee Taylor still helps 
i*'"* • wives sans kitchen clatter 




/ 



While Cole handled the commercials 
Mary Lee stirred noisily in a mixing bowl 
and told housewives at great length how 
to make a plum pudding with Pet Milk, 
naturally. It wasn't inspired radio but 
the distaff side of the house liked it, sent 
for Mary Lee Taylor recipes and bought 
Pet Milk. 

As the years rolled by, Mary Lee Taylor 
became the oldest continuously-sponsored 
show on CBS and Susan Cost was learning 
things. She discovered, for example, that 
a good recipe wasn't enough. It had to 
use ingredients that were plentiful — • 
seasonable crops. She had to suggest 
alternatives, for not everything is avail- 
able in all sections of the country at the 



same time — except Pet Milk, of course. 
She had to get away from straight exposi- 
tion and she did develop a warm, chatty 
style as she and the announcer kicked 
around an idea. 

Although Betty Crocker has been no 
one person, the program's development 
has been much the same as Pet Milk's. 
Betty Crocker was first a local operation, 
then a network show, then off the air, and 
now it's a two-web presentation (NBC 
and ABC). Today, Betty Crocker runs as 
two shows, five minutes on NBC in the 
middle of a block of General Mills day- 
time serials, and a Monday-through- 
Friday half-hour "magazine" on ABC. 
Crocker is still a drop in the bucket of 



Sponsors Plan Code of 
Own as Stations Vote 



Although the effective date for the 
Standards of Practice for broadcasting has 
not been set due to the fact that they have 
been referred to the membership of the 
National Association of Broadcasters for 
approval, stations generally are putting 
their houses in order in the expectation 
that the Standards will be passed. 

The Code, as the Standards are gener- 
ally referred to, is tighter than present 
practices on commercial time but more 
liberal than the restrictions originally pro- 
posed. Maximum commercial time is set 
as follows: 

Commercial Time 

Program Period Day NIglit 

(Minutes) (Minutes) (Minutes) 

5 1:15 1:00 

10 2:10 2:00 

15 3:00 2:30 

25 4:00 2:45 

30 4:15 3:00 

45 5:45 4:30 

60 7:00 6:00 

Participating programs which in the 
past have been exempt from commercial 
time regulations will be bound by the 
above schedules. Station breaks (periods 
between programs) will not be figured as 
part of the program time and are exempt 
from these regulations. Also exempt will 
be one hour a day which stations can use 
for shopping guides, market information, 
and other informative programs, since the 
NAB has come to the conclusion that such 
programs do perform a public service. 

News programs of 10 minutes or less are 
restricted to two commercials and other 
news programs are subject to the regular 
commercial limitations. 

Double spotting (two commercials be- 
tween programs) is prohibited except that 
time signals of 10 seconds in length are not 



to be construed as spot announcements. 

Attempts by the networks to get 
together and formulate a network code of 
their own have broken up. This is 
because there is definite feeling among 
some of the webs that they should not set 
themselves up as a super-tribunal more 
important than the NAB. In other words, 
the networks are part of broadcasting, and 
although not active members of the in- 
dustry association (they're associate mem- 
bers) they want the public and the adver- 
tising profession to know that they're part 
of radio and don't consider themselves 
radio itself. 

There is a growing sentiment among 
sponsors that the advertising profession 
might well establish for itself a code of 
broadcast practices and thus increase the 
effectiveness of air advertising. To this 
end a survey of advertising practices is 
currently being conducted for a number of 
key sponsors. When the report (highly 
confidential) is submitted and digested, 
the sponsors who are underwriting the 
survey will suggest to the Association of 
National Advertisers (ANA) and the 
American Association of Advertising 
Agencies (AAAA) that these two organi- 
zations set up their own broadcast Stand- 
ards of Practices. This would be an in- 
spiration for the stations and take the 
pressure off the NAB. However, no such 
self-imposed code will be submitted to the 
associations involved before June 1. 

At present most agencies are adapting 
their operations to what they call the 
"interim code"- — the time limitations im- 
posed in the Standards now being voted 
upon by the NAB membership. 



GM advertising, which is currently 
$1 1 ,000,000 a year of which 72 per cent is 
spent in radio. 

Mary Lee Taylor carries half the adver- 
tising burden for Pet Milk. Instead of 
a dozen programs, like General Mills, Pet 
has two, Taylor and Saturday Night Sere' 
nade, the latter in its 11th year. Last 
year Taylor received its latest alteration. 
To give it that "new look" half the pro- 
gram is given over to a complete dramatic 
15 minutes, with a Claudia-like heroine 
(the series is adapted from the novel 
Young Wife). This program formula 
change was insisted upon by CBS which 
felt that a straight home economics show 
in a sequence that included Let's Pretend, 
Adventurers' Club, Theater of Today, Stars 
Over Hollywood, etc., would lose its audi- 
ence. Both agency and client bridled at 
the network's insistence but Columbia 
was proved right. Mary Lee Taylor has 
kept its kitchen faithfuls and practically 
doubled its rating. Before the face-lifting 
it was gathering a 1.5 to 2.0 Hooper. 
Now it ranges from 2.5 to 4. The drama 
and the information are well integrated. 

Betty Crocker has also recently under- 
gone rejuvenating alterations. The NBC 
spot is just five minutes in length in the 
midst of an hour of General Mills enter- 
tainment — Today's Children, Woman in 
White, The Story of Holly Sloan, and 
Light of the World. The ABC Crocker is 
really a 30-minute women's variety pro- 
gram with news, fashion information, 
guest stars, a quiz with prizes, and finally 
the kitchen session. The new Crocker 
show (ABC) made its bow March 1947. 

What Mary Lee Taylor has accom- 
plished, in conjunction with Pet Milk's 
Saturday Night Serenade, is tangible and 
checkable. In the past decade Pet Milk 
sales have gone up 131 per cent while the 
entire canned milk market has expanded 
only 40 per cent (excluding government 
sales in both cases). 

House names with solid consumer fol- 
lowings are invaluable. Betty Crocker 
and Mary Lee Taylor have proved that. 
They've also proved that there's nothing 
wrong with the home-service type of pro- 
graming as long as it keeps up with the 
times. The only thing wrong with test 
kitchens is that they tend to become 
dated. The primary thing that the 
American housewife wants new is her 
kitchen — ask any builder. What goes for 
the listener's home goes for her listening 
also. Her cooking instructor must be as 
up-to-the-minute as tomorrow's head- 
lines. If the kitchen mentor is, she can, 
as Mary Lee Taylor does, deliver sales f)er 
can or package at less than one cent per 
dollar of sales. 

SPONSOR 



TV COSTS: 

(Continued from page 19) 

there will be more than 100,000 television 
sets in homes in Metropolitan New York. 
This means an "available audience" of 
600,000* in this area. When the event is 
important enough this figure jumps to 
enormous proportions. The World Series, 
according to a C. E. Hooper survey, was 
seen and heard by 3,962,336 people over 
television, which is more than six times 
the year-end TV "available audience" 
figure. One way to become "socially 
prominent" is to own a TV receiver. 
(Although such prominence, needless to 
say, brings more than its share of ex- 
expense. "Friends you never knew you 
had become bosom companions," accord- 
ing to one set owner. "And the cost of 
hospitality runs high, if you're not 
careful.") 

Duane Jones' clients expect to get, as 
previously noted, dollar-for-dollar results 
from their telecasts. It's questionable 
whether Babbitt will sell Bab-0, via TV, 
at the cent-and-a-half per can that sound 
broadcasting costs them. To do this, 
television would have to market 50,754 
cans a month. This isn't entirely im- 
possible, since Missus is to originate each 

*Six viewers per receiver is an accepted average today 



irS THE 



MAKES A STATI 



T 



MONROE, LOUISIANA 

HAS MORE 
LISTENERS 

in Northeastern Louisiana 

Thai^il Other Stations 

tmbin 

JllATtD ' 
AN BROADCASTING CO. 

REftESEttTED Vtm^ 




telecast in a giant market and visual 
credits for all sponsors will be used on 
every airing. Nevertheless it is hardly 
likely at this stage of TV development 
that such sales results can yet be achieved. 
Missus Goes A'Shopping is a daytime 
program and the daytime audience, ex- 
cept for an event like the World Series, is 
only a small percentage of the total tele- 
vision homes. It is possible, however, 
that through Bab-O's point-of-sale pro- 
motion TV won't cost them much more 
than the radio which has brought them 
their success (sponsor, November 1946). 
Just using television won't be enough 
for any sponsor. That, all agencies using 



the medium agree. Coupled with intelli- 
gent sales promotion, however, it has 
already produced results. Pabst Blue 
Ribbon Beer has sponsored a number of 
football games in the New York market, 
over WNBT. After the first program 
they reported that Pabst hit an all-time 
high in the sale of their brew in the 
taverns and clubs of Greater New York. 
Swift is finding an improved acceptance 
for its brand name in New York through 
its sponsorship of the Swijt Home Service 
Club which during November it extended 
from a one-station telecast to the NBC 
Television Network. 

^Please turn to page 47) 



MAKING 



FRIENDS ON 



THE FARM, 



TOO 




WSBT covers a true cross-section of America's industrial-agricultural population. 
With increased power, WSBT gives increased service to farmers as well as city 
folks. One example of this service is "Farm Report," the newest WSBT program. 
It is aimed directly at the rich farm market of Indiana and southern Michigan. 
WSBT makes friends everywhere it goes. Today, with increased power and 
increased service, it is making them fast— in the city and on the farm. 



960 KILOCYCLES 
COLUMBIA NETWORK 




50O0 WATTS 



DECEMBER 1947 



PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 

39 



NOW! 



OU C€L4t 



uU . . . 



THE RICH 

DOWNSTATE 

ILLINOIS 

MARKET 

G*ul wiik . . . 

"Southern Illinois' Moif Powerful 
Radio Voice" 

WMIX 

cuui 

WMIX 



the only station covering ell of this 
rich downstatc oil, coel, farmins 
and industrial wealth with both 
AM and FM at a single low rate. 

No. 2 Radio Center, Mt. Vernon, III. 



940 AM 



94.1 FM 



National Representative 
John E. Pearson Company 



COFFEE ON THE AIR 

^Conixnued jrom page 23) 

say COFFEE, I mean Folger's," and liite 
slogans, with making substantial contri- 
butions to the sale of the brands using 
them. The good slogans leave what 
Robert H. Bennett, sales and advertising 
manager for Maxwell House Coffee at 
Ceneral Foods, calls a "favorable climate" 
of feeling about the brand. He considers 
this favorable psychological reaction vital 
in turning advertising into sales. An he 
feels that broadcasting performs an out- 
standing mission as a vehicle for slogans 
to create a beachhead for straight selling. 

Maxwell House uses two daytime strips, 
the long-proved Portia Faces Life and the 
experimental marriage of news and soap 
opera, Wendy Warren. These five-days- 
a-week slogan carriers do their job for 
Maxwell as well as for a number of other 
General Foods products. General Foods, 
generally speaking, doesn't keep one pro- 
gram selling the same product through 
the years. It makes a habit of selling one 
of its products to a program's audience 
and then assigning to that program the 
responsibility of being good-will ambassa- 
dor for another GF baby. This is not 
true, of course, of its Maxwell House 
Coffee Time on Thursdays at 8:30 p.m. 
The story of Maxwell House and night- 
time radio will be touched upon later in 
this linking of radio and coffee. 

Broadcasting is one of the world's 
greatest distributors of premiums. There's 
hardly a daytime serial that hasn't at one 
time or another used a self-liquidating 
offer, and while this type of selling went 
down during the war it's on the way back 
very strong in the coffee field right now. 
These self-liquidating offers are entirely 
different from the big contests that the 
soaps, cleansers, and drug products con- 
tinue to use. 

Typical of what can be done for coffee 
through broadcasting and a popular pre- 
mium (not all offers are popular, as was 
indicated in sponsor's November 1946 
report on Bab'O's Ad'$$$$) is a recent 
experience of Folger's. During this past 
summer "radio offers," as their agency, 
Raymond R. Morgan, calls them, pulled 
close to a half million returns. The offers 
included ball point pens, cook books, and 
dictionaries, in return for "evidence-of- 
purchase" of a can of Folger's and from 
10 to 25 cents, according to the offer. 
Summer is a slump period in coffee sales 
and the offers were made only over radio. 

This spring will see most regional 

brands using premium offers of one kind 

or another and even the "coupon worth 

one penny in each and every can" is 

{Please turn to page 43) 



COVERING 


KEY METROPOLITAN 


MARKET AREAS 


WKAP 


Allentown 


KVET 


Austin 


WSID 


Haltiiiiore 


WORL 


HostoM 


WFAK 


Charleston, S. C. 


WTIP 


Charleston, W. Va. 


WGTL 


(Charlotte 


WSBC 


Chicago 


KSIX 


Corpus Christi 


WJBK 


Detroit 


WBBC 


Flint 


KNUZ 


Houston 


WLAN 


Lancaster 


KWKW 


Los Angeles 


WNEX 


Macon 


WHHM 


Memphis 


WMLO 


Mil\>aukee 


WMIN 


Minn. -St. Paul 


WBNX 


New York 


WLOW 


Norfolk 


WDAS 


Philadelphia 


KARV 


Phoenix - Mesa 


WWSW 


Pittsburgh 


WRIB 


Providence 


KXLW 


St. Louis 


KONO 


San Antonio 


KUSN 


San Diego 


KEEN 


San Jose 


KFMJ 


Tulsa 


WWDC 


Wash.. D. C. 


WHWL 


\\ ilkes-Barre 


WTUX 


\\ ihnington 


Forjoe 


& Company 


National Representatives 


New York • 


Chicago • Philadelphia 


Pittsburgh • 


Washington* Baltimore 


Los Ange 


es • San Francisco 



40 



SPONSOR 



Moirthly Tabiilatioii olliaverttsmg by Categories 



DECEMBER CROSS SECTIOIV: COFFEE 



AGENCY 



PROGRAMS 



M 



M 



^^^ 








*KRON COFFEE* GROCERY 
CO. AKRON, OHIO 




Betsy Ross 


News; 5:30-5:45 pm; WADC (Akron) 




ALABAMA COFFEE CO, 
SHEFFIELD, AU. 





Old Gold 




Spots; MTWTFS; WMSL (De- 

tur) 


AMERICAN ACE COFFEE, 
NASHVILLE 


Mike Hedrick, 
Nashville 


American Ace 


Grand Old Opry; Sat 7:30-8 pm; 20 sta 




C. W. ANTRIM & SONS, 
RICHMOND, VA. 


Lindsa.v, Richmond 


Old Mansion 


Kate Smith Speaks; MTWTF 12-12:15 pm; 
WLEE (Richmond) 


Live, e.t. spots, breaks 


ARNOLD AABORN INC, N. Y. 


Samuel Croot. N. Y. 


Aborn's 


Morning Musical Clock; 15-min partic; WHEC 
(Rochester) 





BORDEN CO. N Y 


Kenyon & Eckhardt 


Borden's Instant 


H. V. Kaltenborn; MTWTF 7:45-8 pm; WBEN 

(Buffalo). County Fair; Sat 1:30-2 pm; 161 CBS 

sta 





BREAKFAST CLUB COFFEE INC. 
LA. 


Lockwood-Shackleford, 
L. A. 


Breakfast Club 


Arizona Quiz; KTAR (Phoenix) 




CALIFORNIA PACKING CO, S. F. 




Del Monte 




Live, e.t. spots, breaks; major 
mkts 


CAMPBELL-WOODS CO, 
PITTSBURGH 


Wiltman & Callahan, 
Pittsburgh 


Breakfast Cheer 


Songs You Love to Hear; Mon 7:30-8 pm; KDKA 
(Pittsburgh) 




COMMUNITY COFFEE MILLS, 
BATON ROUGE 





Community 


Kiernan; MTWTF 2-2:15 pm; WLCS (Baton 

Rouge). 
Hicks; MTWTF 8:45-9 am: KALB(Alexandria) 


Spots; WLCS. WJBO (Baton 
Rouge) 


CONSOLIDATED GROCERS 

ISPRAGUEWARNERDIV),CHI. 


Weiss & Geller, Chi. 


Richelieu 




Spots; WENR (Chi.) 


DEAN LILLY CO, MEMPHIS 


Cole, Memphis 







Spots; WMSL (Decatur, Tenn.) 


DIXIE COFFEE CO. 
BIRMINGHAM 




Dixie 


Jimmie WiUson; MTWTF 2:30-2:45 pm csf; 
WAPI (Birmingham) 




OOANS FOOD MARKETS. 
AUBURN, N. Y. 




Boscul 


Remember When; WMBO (Auburn) 




DONOVAN COFFEE CO. 
BIRMINGHAM 




Red Diamond 




Breaks; WAPI (Birmingham), 

southern mkts 


DUNCAN COFFEE CO. 
HOUSTON 


Steele, Houston 


.\dmiration 


Coffee Shop, variety, 40 southern, wouthwestern 
mkts. 


Live, e.t. spots, breaks; southern, 
southwestern mkts 


DAVID G. EVANS COFFEE CO. 
ST. LOUIS 


Olen R. Stocker, 
St. Louis 


Old Judge 


Kennv Baker (e.t.) ; 14 southern, midwestem mkts. 
News"; KVfOC (Poplar Bluff), AVMIX (Mt. Ver- 
non! . Kon Howard Hillbilly Show; KLCN 
(Blytheville) 




FLEETWOOD COFFEE CO, 
CHATTANOOGA 


Nelson Chesman, 
Chattanooga 


Fleetwood 


Bill Henrv & the News; MTWTF 8:45-9 pm; 
WDOD (Chattanooga) 


Live, e.t. breaks. 1-5-min spots; 
12 southern mkts 


J. A. FOLGER&CO. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 


Grant, Chi. 


Folger 


Judv & Jane (e.t.1; 25 sta. Singing Sam; KMMJ 
(Grand Island, Neb.) 


Breaks; midwestem mkts 


J. A. FOLGER&CO, S. F. 


Raymond R. Morgan, 
H'wood. 


Folger 


News; MTWTFS 7-7:15 am, 4-4:15 pm; Mutual- 
Don Lee, Inter-Mountain nets 


Breaks; western mkts 


F0LT2 TEA & COFFEE CO. 
NEW IBERIA, LA. 






Kate Smith Speaks; 12-12:15 pm; KANE (New 
Iberia) 




FORBES TEA & COFFEE CO, 
ST. LOUIS 


Seelig, St. Louis 


Forbes 


Food Store Quiz; KXOX (St. Louis) 





GENERAL FOODS. N. Y. 


Benton & Bowles, N. Y. 


Yuban, Maxwell House 


Burns & Allen; Th 8:30-9 pm; 143 NBC sta. 
Portia Faces Life: MTWTF 5:15-5:30 pm; 87 
NBC sta. Wendv Warren: MTWTF 12-12: 15 pm; 
145 CBS sta. Dinner Concert; MTWTFS 0:30-7 
pm;WQXR(N. Y.) 


Spots, WQXR (N. Y.) 


GENERAL GROCER CO, 
ST. LOUIS 


Olian, St. Louis 


Manhattan 


Telephone Quiz; 12 southern, western mkt« 




JAMES G GILL CO, 
NORFOLK 






Information Please; F 9:30-10 pm; WSAP 
P(ortsmouth, Va.) 




GRIFFIN GROCERY CO, 
MUSKOGEE, OKU. 


R. J. Potts— Calkins i 
Holden, Kansas City, Mo. 


Griffin 


Newscast; KFPW (Ft. Smith. OkU.1. FootbaU 
games; KOMA (Okla. City) 


E.t. breaks; 5 southwestern mkts 


MARTIN L. HALL CO, 
BOSTON 


JohnlC. Dowd. Boston 


Victor 


Bill Cunningham; WN AC (Boston). Fulton Lewis 
Jr.; WNAC, WEAN (Providence), WA.\B (Wor- 
cester, Mass.) 


Live. e.t. spots; major New Engl, 
mkts 


HOFFMAN & HAYMAN COFFEE 
CO, SAN ANTONIO 




H&H 


News; MTWTF 1:45-2 pm; WOAI (San Antonio). 
Mexican Fiesta; 15-min partic; KWBU (Corpus 

Christi) 


E.t. spots; southern mkts 


HUDSON'S BAY CO. 

WINNIPEG MAN CANADA 


Cockfield, Brown, 
WiniiiiKg 


Fort Garry 





Time signals: CHWK (Chilliwack 
B. C , Can ) 



m. 



'^M 



SPONSOR AGENCY PRODUCT PROGRAMS SPOTS | 


ISBRANOTUN-UOUEI CO. 
BOJTON 


(Jowan A I)*riglfr, N. \. 


"20" 


— 


Ln-e, e.t. fpoU. partic; 10-20 
easteni nikta 


J.|F. S. COFFEE CO. 
KNOXVIUE 




J. F. G. 


Ethel 4 Albert; MTWTF 2:16-2:30 pm; WBIE 

(Knoxville). WGAA (Cedartown. Ga.). Cecil 
Brown; MTWTF 10-10:15 am; WBU (Dalton. 
Ga.). Agronaky; MTWTF 8-8:15 am; WDEF 
(Chattanooga). World News; Sun 9-8:15 am; 
WROL (BSioxriUe). Western Music; WGGA 
(Gainesville, Fla.) 




KROGER GROCERY ft BAKIMG 
CO. CINCI. 


Ralph H. Jooet, Cinci. 


SpotUght 


Linda's First Love (e.t.); MTWTF 10:15-10:30 
am;28sU 


Live, e.t. apota; maior mkts 


LAFER BROTHERS, DETROIT 




Lafer 


I've Got Your Number; WXYZ (Detroit) 




UGOMARCINO CRUPE CO. 
CRESTON, lA. 




Atwood 




Spots; western mkts 


U PERU COFFEE CO. 
PASMIC. N. J. 




LaPerla 


L'Angelo Ignoto; MTWTF 6:30-6 pm; WOV 

(N. Y.) 




U TOURJklNE COFFEE CO. 
BOSTON 


IngaUn-Mioiter, Boaton 


La Touraine 


Tello-Test; MWF; WONS fHartford). WAAB 

(Worcester). Melody Mail Quii; MWF 8:45-9 

am; WBZ (Boston), WBZA (Springfield) 





H. P. LAU CO. 
LINCOLN. NEB 





Milady 


Ethel 4 Albert; MTWTF 2:15-2:30 pm; KFOR 
(Lincohi), KORN (Fremont). KGFW (Kearney) 




LEE ft CADY, DETROIT 


PoweU-Grant. N. Y. 


Quaker 




E.t. spots; 11 southern, mid- 
western mkts 


M. LIVINGJTON ft CO. 
PADUCAH. KY. 




Goldbloom 


(Juis; M 2:45-3:15 pm; WKYB (Paducah) 





JOSEPH MARTINSON ft CO 
INC. N. Y. 


Neff-Rogow, N. Y. 


Martinson's 


News; WQXR (N. Y.) 


E.t. spots; WCBS (N. Y.) 


MC CORMICK ft CO. 8ALT0. 


Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell 
& Bayles. N. Y. 


Schilling 




Live spots; major mkts 


MC GARVEY COFFEE CO, 
MNPLS. 


Fadell, Mnpls. 


Flame Room 


Cedric Adams' Stairway to Stardom; Coffee Time; 
Sat 6-6:30 pm; WCCO (MnpU.) 




MIRAMAR TRADING CO, N.Y. 




Mirco 


Judge O'Malley; MTWTFS 4:30-5 pm; WOV 
(N. Y.) 





MOREY MERCANTILE CO. 
DENVER 


Gray, Denver 


Solitaire 




1-min live, e.t, spots 


MORNING TREAT COFFEE CO, 
BATON ROUGE 




Morning Treat 


Music; WJBO (Baton Rouge) 




NASH COFFEE CO. ST. PAUL 


Erwin, Wasey, Mnpls. 


Nash's 


Fulton Lewis Jr, other news, music, spots; 26 
major mkts 


E.t. spots; major mkte 


NESTLE-S MILK PRODUCTS 
IMC, N.Y. 


Compton, N. Y. 


Nescafe 


Paul Whiteman Club; MTWTF 4-4:15 pm; 202 
ABC sta 




NORTH AMERICAN COFFEE 
CO, PORT HURON. MICH. 


Billiard, Fort Huron 


Dunker's Club 




Spots; WXYZ (Detroit) 


PASTENE PRODUCTS CO. N. V. 




Pastene 


News, music (e.t.); MTWTFS; WOV (N. Y.) 




PAXTON ft GALUGHER. 
OMAHA 


Buchanan-Thomas, Omaha 


Butternut 


CBS Morning News; 9-9:15 am; WTAQ (Green 
Bay, Wise.). News; MTWTF; KMMJ (Grand 
Island, Neb.). News; WNAX (Yankton, S. D.) 




RAGUND POTTER CO, 
NASHVILLE 


Noble Dury, NashviUe 


Fireside 




Live, e.t., spots; MTWTFS 4 per 
day 


WILLIAM REILLEY COFFEE 
CO, NEW ORLEANS 


Walker Saussey, 
New Orleans 


Luiianne 


Old Corral; 2 southern mkts 





ROUNDY, PECKHAMft 
DEXTER CO. MILW. 


Hoffman & York, Milw. 


Roundy's 


Partic 


Live, e.t. spots, breaks; WTMJ, 
WFOX, WEMP, WISN (Milw.) 


SAFEWAY STORES. 
OAKUND. CALIF. 




Edwards 


Dr. Paul; MTWTF 3:45-4 pm pst; 28 NBC sta. 
News: WRVA (Richmond. Va.) 





S. A. SCHONBRUNN ft CO. 
N.Y. 


Lawrence Gumbinoer, N. Y. 


Savarin 


Hi! Jinx; MWF 8:45-9 am; WNBC (N. Y.). 

Missus Goes A-Shopping; MWF 10:16-10:30 am; 

WCBS (N. Y.) 


Spots, breaks: WNBC. WCBS 

(N. Y.) 


SCHOHE COFFEE ft SPICE 
MILLS. JACKSON. MISS. 




Masterpiece 


Fulton Lewis Jr; WRBC (Jackson) 




WILLIAM S. SCULL CO, 
CAMDEN 


Kastor, FarreU, Chesley & 
Chflord, N. Y. 


Boscul 


Market Reports 4 Weather Forecast; MWF 7:4ft- 
7:46 am; WLW (Cinci.) 





LOUIS SHERRY INC, N. Y. 


Bermingham, Castleman & 
Pierce. N. Y. 


Louis Sherry 


Melodies of Old Vienna; Sun 5:30-6 pm; WQXR 
(N. Y.) 




E T. SMITH CO, 

WORCESTER. MASS. 


Ralph T. Foye 


Constitution 


Kate Smith Speaks; MTWTF 12-12:16 pm; 
WAAB (Worcester) 





STANDARD BRANDS INC. N. Y. 


J. Walter Thompson, N. Y. 


Chase i Sanborn, Instant 
Chase & Sanborn 


Charlie McCarthy; Sun 8-8:30 pm; 143 NBC sta 





STEWART ft ASHBY COFFEE 
CO. CHI. 


Chi. 


Stewart's 


Paul Harvey News; Sun 10-10:15 pm est; WENR 
(Chi.) 




WAPPLES PUTTER CO, 
FORT WORTH 




White Swan 




Breaks; southwestern mkts 


THOMAS J WEBB CO. CHI 


Ivan Hill, Chi. 


Thomas J. Webb 




Forfign language e.t. spots. 

breaks- WSBC. WGES (Chi.\ 

WEMP. WFOX 'Milw.) 


JOHN H WILKINSCO INC. 
WASHINGTON. D. C 


Lewis Edwin Ryan, 
Washington 


Wilkins 


The Factfinder; WTOP (Wash.) 





WOODS COFFEE CO. 

ROANOXF V« 




H4C 


Blend of Melodv (e.t.): Tu 12:30-12:46 pm: 
WINC-FM (Winchester) 






t * 



COFFEE ON THE AIR 

{Continued from page 40) 

scheduled for a New York and Midwest 
regional brand. 

Proof of purchase is also becoming a 
standard request with regional and local 
coffee broadcasters who use quiz pro- 
grams. No matter how successful a show 
is, the sponsors are switching back to 
their pre-war habit of wanting to see re- 
sults in terms of actual sales. A success- 
ful program like Forbes Food Store Quiz 
(KXOK, St. Louis — sponsor, March 
1947) during the war and the immediate 
postwar period did not ask for any proof 
of purchase with the questions sent in. 
When the program returned to the air this 
fall after a summer hiatus, listeners were 
asked to send proof of purchase, or the 
usual facsimile, with their suggested quiz 
questions. This hasn't cut down the 
number of questions. The prizes have 
increased. The mail has also. Awards 
like innerspring mattresses, radios, 
vacuum coffee makers, are sure-fire 
pullers. 

Another indication of what a quiz can 
do for a coffee is reported in a KXOK 
success story. The General Grocer Com- 
pany has used a telephone quiz in which 
the questions originate with the listeners. 
Somewhat like Tello-Test in formula, $5 
goes to the person sending in the question 
and $5 goes to the person giving the cor- 
rect answer on the telephone when called. 
Each time the question goes unanswered 
both the sender and the person called 
have the opportunity of winning extra 
five dollar bills since that's the amount 
added daily until the person receiving the 
station's call comes up with the correct 
answer. One hundred thousand pieces of 
mail were received the first year. The 
quiz sold an amazing quantity of Man- 
hattan Coffee — this despite the fact that 
Forbes was also selling coffee on the same 
station, and that there are a number of 
other good stations in St. Louis. 

Folk music appears also to be program 
material that coffee lovers want to hear. 
As shown in the types of programs used 
by roasters, folk music represents in the 
SPONSOR cross-section 9.8 per cent of all 
programs used by coffee firms. In the 
South and Southwest, range and moun- 
tain music gather solid coffee-drinking 
audiences. Griffin Grocery Company of 
Oklahoma City reports, for instance, that 
it has consistently sold all the coffee 
(Polar Bear) it could produce using 
Cousin Jack Beasley's western music over 
stations KOMA in Oklahoma City and 
KTUL in Tulsa. While it didn't go over- 
board in promoting Cousin Jack it did 



^^IBCing you". . . in INDIANAPOLIS 



The Top "Hoosieratings" 
Go to Live Talent Shows 

When it comes to radio listening in Hoosierland. the 
shows that earn the greatest ovations — and the most 
impres.sive sales results — are the programs planned, 
written, played and ]jro(luced hy the live talent staff at 
WIBC. For not only does Indianapolis' fastest grow- 
ing radio station have the largest live talent staff in 
town, but the faces on the towering WI1?C totem pole 
are the most familiar and most favored in Indiana radio. 
So to send Indiana sales soaring, ask your jolm Hlair 
Man for full details on WIBC live talent shows — 
cither ready-made, or specially tailored to flatter your 
])roduct's sales physique. 



JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 



WIBC 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

1070 KC 
5000 WATTS 
BASIC MUTUAL 



The INDIANAPOLIS NEWS Station 



what {U\S& Time-Buyers see 
in WHBC's new coverage 

THE 
BEST BALANCED 



MARKET IN THE -^ 
UNITED STATES 

318,440 Radio Families 
50,540 Farms 
1,791 Manufacturing Firms 
21,019 Retail Stores 




5000 

WATTS 
DAY AND NIGHT 

ABC 



\ly 



?.£' 



pRtSV 



KTV^^ 



'R^ai" 



(kU' 



v^hbc 



CANTON, OHIO 

The Best Balanced Market in the United States 



DECEMBER 1947 



4J 



use newspaper ads and singing commer' 
cials to direct attention to its programs 
and product. 

One objective of the national coffee 
association at present is, among others, to 
hit the young married market, the age 
group under 35, since only 16 per cent of 
this group are said to be consistent coffee 
drinkers. However, this campaign has 
not as yet influenced coffee roasters and 
merchandisers to any great degree. There 
are very few programs on the air directed 
to the young marrieds and the 20 30 age 
group. The Coffee Advertising Council 
feels this is a virgin market and must be 



tapped. Peak drinking is in the 40-tO'45 
age bracket, although one-third of the 
35-40 group are also supposed to be 
three-meals-a-day coffee drinkers. 

Indicative of the fact that "taste" is 
not the conclusive factor that it's sup- 
posed to be in coffee preferences is the 
fact that Chicago, long rated as a "heavy 
roast" market, i.e., a user of the dark- 
roasted bean instead of the light, changed 
to a light-bean territory when Hills 
Coffee invaded the market and refused to 
accept what local roasters claimed, that 
the Windy City insisted upon heavy 
coffee. 



Cliicag^o's 



IS 



T 

P 
S 



spot on the dial — 560 k.c. 



circulation buy — according to Hooperatings. 



in music, in news, in sports. 



studio facilities — new in the Wrigley Building. 



in public service features. 



in national spot billing. 



station choice — for maximum returns per dollar. 



Of the three truly national brands, the 
A&P group. Maxwell House, and Chase & 
Sanborn, the latter two have used broad- 
casting consistently and the former 
haven't used the air to any extent since 
1936 when they sponsored Kate Smith. 

Maxwell House is rated as the first big 
national brand. They've used broadcast- 
ing since 1932 when they presented the 
Maxwell House Concert over NBC. Since 
that time they have had a parade of 
notable programs and a few bloomers. 
Their radio calendar looks like this: 



Program 


Web 




t>ates 


Maxwell Mouse 








Concert 


NBC 


Jan 


Mar '32 


Tune Blenders 


CBS 


Mar 


-Jun "32 


.Showboat 


NBC 


Oct 


•32-Oct "37 


Good News 


NBC 


.Nov 


'37-Oct '40 


Kale Hopkins 


CBS 


Oct 


'40-Apr "42 


Coffee Time 


NBC 


Nov 


•40-Sep '43 


Topper 


.NBC 


Aug 


•44-.Sep '45 


Thin Man 


NBC 


Sep 


'44-Sep '45 


Burns & .\llen 


NBC 


Sep 


'45-(current) 


Second Mrs. Burton 


CBS 


Jan 


'46-Mar '46 


Wendy Warren 


CBS 


Jun 


'47-(curTent) 



Of these programs the Maxwell House 
Showboat is perhaps the best-known. In- 
spired by the great Broadway musical 
show of the same name, at first the cast 
was headed by Charles Winninger, also 
from the Broadway cast, as the lovable 
Captain Henry. Later (in its decline) it 
became a vehicle for Lanny Ross. Show- 
boat is rated as having done more for 
Maxwell House than any other of its 
programs, although some of the Maxwell 
House Coffee Time shows, the title being 
an omnibus tag which has included a 
number of formulas, have had great fol- 
lowings, especiall\' the Frank Morgan 
series. 

General Foods did more promotion foi 
its Showboat than it has for nearly an> 
other program except for the premiere of 
its Good News, which was the first net- 
work program in the $25,0O0-a-week- 
talent-budget class. This was, at the out- 
set, a package sold by Metro-Goldwyn- 
Mayer and broadcast direct from the 
MGM lot. It was the greatest all-star 
clambake that radio had heard up to that 
time and MGM bowed out soon after the 
first few programs. However, to intro- 
duce it, General Foods used huge space 
and pla\cd up all the great MGM names 
scheduled. It could have been great. It 
was a gigantic bust. Out of it, however, 
grew a number of programs that General 
Foods has carried on, like Baby Suooks, 
its Frank Morgan opus, and others. 

General Foods' record of successful 
vehicles for Maxwell House as well as for 
Sanka and Postum rates an industry blue 
ribbon. It has backed ver\- few lemons. 
There were of course McGarry and His 
Mouse, Tuv on a Clue, and Kate Hopkins, 
{Please turu to page 00) 



44 



SPONSOR 



siped and unsigned 



Ad<jieAiliin(f A(fe4iC4f Pe/UOH^ijei QUoHife^, 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Richard C Bachman 
Robert N. Baggs 
James S. Beard 
Burton U. Beck 
F. J. Bruguiere 
Tom Cafferty 
Gordon D. Gates 
Bert Gavanaugh 
Charles E. Goleman 
E. R. Gollard 
Douglas Goulter 
Seth Dennis 
John Eichhorn 
Leonard M. Einsidler 
Catherine Lewis Fassett 
Milton J. Feldman 
Henry Flarsheim 
R. David Fris 
Mary Elizabeth Gaynor 
Jack Gregory 
William E. Holden 
Charles Hotchkiss 

Allen Hubbard 
Robert Hussey 
Adolphe Larson ^ 
Jean Lawler 

Joseph H. Le Moyne] 
Harold Livingston 
Louise Ludke 
George Laflin Miller 
Roger Pryor 
Sherwin R. Rodgers 
V. L. Scantlin 
L W. Scott 
Louis E. Tilden 
(i. A. Wasser 
Ernest A. Wilcox 
Tedford L. Woodard 
Alvin Zeller 



MBS, N. Y., acct exec 

Intl Resistance, Phila., sis mgr 

NBC, H'wood., Calif. 

Fawcett Pub, N. Y., research dir 

Avery-Nolan, .S. F. 

WGN, Chi., comml anncr 

Young & Rubicam, N. Y. 

Buchanan, L. A., acct exec 

Crown Overall Mfg Co, Cinci., adv mgr 

Foote, Cone & Belding, N. Y., radio dir 

ABC, N. Y. 

KING, Seattle, comml mgr 

Maas Studios of H'wood., H'wood., adv mgr 

Earl Ludgin, Chi., asst timebuyer 

Amer Red Cross (S. E. Pa. Chapt), radio dir 

H. M. Gross. Chi. 

Charlotte (N. C) News, natl adv mgr 

WTRY, Troy, N. Y., women's dir 

Allied, L. A., acct exec 

Affiliated Products Inc. N. Y., vp, gen mgr 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N. Y., TV, publ, 
prom head 

Allied, L. A., acct exec 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Chi., media dir 

Welborn, L. \., acct exec 

Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, N. Y., time- 
buyer 

WING, Dayton, acct exec 

Barton A. Stebbins, L. A., prodn, media dir 
Williams & Saylor, N. Y., vp 
Radio, stage, screen actor 
Harry J. Lazarus, Chi., radio dir, acct exec 
Buchanan, Chi., acct exec 
Montgomery Ward & Co, Chi. 
Sherman & Marquette, Chi., radio dir 
KQV, Pittsburgh, gen mgr 
Advertising House, N. Y., media dir 
( McManus & Riley, Albany, N. Y., adv mgr 
Donahue & Coe, N. Y. 



W. Earl Bothwell, Pittsburgh, new business dcpt head 

Harry P. Bridge, Phila., vp. gen mgr 

O'Brien, Vancouver, radio dir 

Campus, N. Y., partner, gen mgr 

Avery & Bruguiere, S. F., partner 

Charles N. Stahl, L. A., radio dir 

Lennen & Mitchell. N. Y., vp 

Roche, Williams & Cleary, Chi., radio timebuyer 

Same, plans bd chmn 

Keelor & Stites, Cinci., acct exec 

Same, vp 

Federal, N. Y., acct exec 

Hiddleston, Evans & Merrill, Seattle, acct exec 

M. M. Young, L. A., acct exec 

Piedmont, Salisbury, N. C, media exec 

J. M. Korn. Phila., head 

Ruthrauff & Ryan, Chi., acct exec 

Woodard & Fris (new), Albany, N. Y., partner 

Woodard & Fris, Albany, N. Y., radio dir 

Same, .S. F., mgr 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield, N. Y'., acct exec 

Same, Chi., Falstaff Beer acct exec 




Associated, L. A., radio dir 
Foote, Cone & Belding, Chi. 
Western, L. A., acct exec 
Same, chief timebuyer 



media dept mgr 



Hutzler, Dayton, vp, radio head 

Mike Goldgar, Boston, TV head 

Glasser-Gailey, L. A., prodn. media dir 

Doyle, Kitchen & McCormick, N. Y., vp 

Foote, Cone & Belding, N. Y., exec asst to TV head 

Same, vp 

Scantlin & Co (new), Chi., head 

John W. Shaw, Chi., vp, acct exec 

Same, vp 

Pete Wasser Co (new), Pittsburgh, owner 

Same, pres 

Woodard & Fris (new), Albany, N. Y., partner 

Lew Kashuk, N. Y., acct exec 



Sp^04tdJ04> Pe^iianHel QUcuu^ 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



A. D. Adams 
John W. Burgard 

H.'J. Col ton 

C;. B. Hensen Jr. 

Harry G. Kebel 
I). D. Knowles 
Robert S. Lord 
A. Louis Read 
Richard G. Rettig 



Hickey-Murphy-St. George, N. Y., acct exec 
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp, Louisville, 
asst adv mgr 



California Fruit Growers Exchange, 
Calif., chge natl sis 



Ontario, 



Diamond Iron Works, adv mgr 
St. Claire, Detr., acct exec 
WWL, New Orleans, comml mgr 
Whitehall Pharmacal Co., N. Y., adv mgr 



Air King Products Co Inc, N. Y.. adv mgr 
Same, adv mgr 

Blatz Brewing Co, Milw., adv, sis prom, mkt research dir 
Same, adv, sis prom mgr 

Harriet Hubbard Ayer Inc, N. Y., adv mgr 

.Schaefer, Minneapolis, sis proin, adv dir 

National Pressure Cooker Co, Eau Claire, Wis., adv mgr 

Wembley Inc, New Orleans, dir adv, sis prom 

Same, vp 



DECEMBER IV-iT 



^■J■^/^^.yJ y|> l».. ^ . . ■ .^^ n y^AJyJV>y ^ >l l ^JJ^^A^.^yVJ^A^W>J III JJJ ^ ^V ^^ ^ ^ J ^^ JW^^ ' .Wj■ ' ^*^''J'^A^ ■' V.V ' .V ■ ^ ^ .W. JU J ll n.WJkJ i JJ ■ ■ V J V 







COFFEE ON THE AIR 

{Continued from page 44) 
which were valiant tries but not audience- 
getters. 

Sanka's greatest contribution to broad' 
casting history was We, the People, which 
it sponsored for four years. 

Standard Brands, for its Chase & San- 
born Coffee, broke into radio almost as 
soon as SB came into being in 1929. Like 
Maxwell House, it started with a musical 
ensemble. C&S had a choral group from 
September 1929 to September 1930, right 
at America's great headache time. Its 
first great success was Eddie Cantor, who 
sold Chase & Sanborn Coffee for five 
years, at the end of which Cantor decided 
to bow out for greener sponsorship. The 
Chase & Sanborn timetable looks like 
this: 

ProCram VVcb Date 

<;horal Orchestra NBC Sep '29-Sept '30 

Eddie Cantor NBC; Oct •29-Dcc '34 
Rubinoff 

(and Chevalier) NBC Summer '31 

Opera <;uild NBC Dec '34-Mar '35 

Major Bowes NBC Mar '35-Sep '36 

C;<iod Will <:ourt NBC Sep '36-060 '36 
Do You Want to Be 

an Actor? NBC Dec '36-Ma> '37 

.\mechc-Bcrgen NBC May '37-Dec '39 

Berften-McCarthy NBC Jan '40-(current) 

Open Door NBC Jun '43-Jun '44 
CBS 

They also have a record of which to be 



proud, except for one trouble producer, 
Good Will (Murt, which was forced off the 
air due to pressure of bar groups, and 
Opera Guild, to which no one seemed to 
listen. 

Their one attempt at a daytime serial, 
The Open Door, stayed for a short time 
on NBC, shifted to CBS and then went 
off the air in June 1944. It's nothing of 
which they're proud. 

However, any line-up that includes 
Cantor, Bowes, and Charlie McCarthy, 
all at their peak, is something of which 
any sponsor may well be proud. It's a 
credit also to J. Walter Thompson, which 
has had the account all along, and the 
agency's radio vp John Reber, who has 
lived with the account from the start. 

Radio is also credited partly with the 
upsurge of public interest in instant 
coffee, although there's no question but 
that the war-inspired increased produc- 
tion of the concentrate is primarily re- 
sponsible. Having developed the facili- 
ties to produce instant coffee the industry 
naturally wanted to see if a market could 
be created for it. Instant coffee is not, of 
course, a new or a war-bom product. 
Both G. Washington and Barrington 
Hall survived World War I, although 
neither is among the first three today. 

Today's national leaders are big users 



365 QMS A YEAR.' 

lowas l\vin markets — rural and urban 
— give you a bonus "present" every 
day ^\ith the highest per capita income 
in the U. S. A.! 

There's always a holiday buying spirit 
in Iowa's twin markets where listen- 
ing to WMT is a habit 365 days a 
year. (Just as it has been for a 
quarter of a century.) 

.'Vsk the Kat7 man for details. 




■ <'«S>«i'<l>'>&*QC^'^. 



'. _ WNA'SS-N. *:v\"N 



WMT 



CfOAR RAPJOS 



Th* Station Built By Loyal Listinar- 
ihip . . . Now in itt 25tk Yaar! 



BA»C COlUAUfA NITWOHK 
SOOO wottt 600 k. c. Day and Night 



of broadcasting. In sales rank, Nescafe 
is first, Borden's second, and Maxwell 
House third. Nescafe is using the Paul 
Whiteman Club (ABC). Borden's was 
introduced on County Fair and that pro- 
gram for one year represented almost the 
entire advertising for the product. Such, 
however, was the program's impact that 
it brought the product up to second place. 
Chase & Sanborn also have their instant 
coffee on Charlie McCarthy and in tele- 
vision and theirs is one of the six brands 
of soluble coffee which most food mer- 
chandisers feel will survive. These six 
which will remain (unless something un- 
foreseen by coffee men at the present time 
upsets the bean cart) are: Nescafe, Borden, 
Maxwell House, G. Washington, Barring- 
ton Hall and Chase & Sanborn. 

Coffee men point out that the big 
problem is to deliver an instant coffee 
which tastes, to the coffee-drinking pub- 
lic, the same as their regular brew. That's 
why instant brands (except Nescafe) on 
the air stress, besides the convenience, 
that theirs is real coffee. 

In the most recent market surveys con- 
ducted by leading local newspapers and 
radio stations in eight markets, Maxwell 
House has the lead three times, Hills four 
times, and Butternut once. The top 
three according to the surveys, and their 
percentages of the market, appear in the 
following order: 





Omaha 




Ist 


2nd 


3rd 


Butter- 


Folger's (33.3) 


Hills (9.7) 


nut (48.4) 


St. Paul 




Hills (35) 


Butter- 
nut (19.4) 
Indianapolis 


Folger's (18) 


Maxwell (23.4) 


Hills (13.1) 
Philadelphia 


PhoenU (8.4) 


Maxwell (26.1) 


Boscul (21) 
New York 


.\sco(11.8) 


Maxwell (27.2) 


A&P* (22) 
Sacramento 


Martinson (9.5) 


HiUs (34.1) 


MJB(13.8) 
Fresno 


Maxwell (13.1) 


Hills (32.8) 


MJB (18. .S) 
Modesto 


Maxwell (I8.I) 


Hills (32.8) 


Maxwell (13.2) 


MJB (13) 


*All Ihref brands 





The fight for the sale of the 4' 4 pounds 
that the average family buys a month is 
scheduled to be intensified. Nobody in 
the coffee field wants to go back to the 
time when Brazil to hold up the market 
had to dump thousands of bags of coffee 
into the ocean. 

The general feeling in the coffee field is 
that broadcasting can do the selling job. 
After all, it is credited with having made 
a major contribution to increasing the 
U. S. coffee consumption 66 per cent in 
the past 10 years. 



46 



SPONSOR 



TV COSTS 

(Continued from page 39) 

How-to-do'it selling is naturally better 
with sight and sound than it is with sound 
alone. 

The stakes are high in TV but advertis- 
ing executives feel that it will deliver a 
sales miracle for the men who really study 
how to use it. 

WHY SPONSORS CHANGE 

(Continued from page 16) 

is to tear apart a radio program. 

Nevertheless when it comes to closing, 
it's seldom that a contract is signed with- 
out the advertising agency's suggesting a 
complete campaign. Probably less than 
one-third of advertising agency changes 
are consummated without a campaign 
outline. In most cases these campaigns 
are paid for by the prospective clients. 
Very few important agencies at present 
record programs or do finished art for an 
advertiser on spec. Lesser agencies may 
go all out to land new business and fre- 
quently invest as high as $25,000 on a 
presentation and suggested campaign. 
Advertisers who have these presentations 
made to them know that if they "buy" 
the agency they'll actually pay for the 
campaigns in some way or other. 

Twenty-five per cent of all agency 
changes are accomplished without a pre- 
sentation's being made. These come 
about generally through a "suggestion" 
by a major stockholder or financial inter- 
est in a firm to a top corporate executive 
that a change is called for. Such a note 
was written by the president of a motor 
firm to the key executive of a radio manu- 
facturing firm in which he had a sizable 
financial interest. The note read, "You 

old , give the bearer of this note your 

advertising account." 

When Major Bowes sold Chrysler his 
Original Amateur Hour he asked the 
motor man through what agency the 
business should be placed. Chrysler told 
Bowes to select his own since he'd have to 
work with it. 

Bowes in turn asked C, "Doesn't your 
son-in-law work for RuthraufF and 
Ryan?" 

C answered "Yes." 

Bowes then said, "Why not keep it in 
the family?" 

Which explains why R&R billed a 
good slice of the Chrysler advertising 
budget for a number of years. 

Full page advertisements in the New 
York Times, when they had something to 
say, have been known to swing accounts 
to the agency that used the full page. 
Erwin, Wasey, following the financial 
crash of 1929, ran a full page headed 




Find the Sponsor whose station plays Santa Claus to its adver- 
tisers 12 months a year! hHe's the merry-maker who was smart 
enough to sign up with Rochester's 
new live-wire, up-and-at-'em station — 



WVET 



BASIC MUTUAL STATION 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

5000 WATTS 1280 KC 

NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY WEED AND COMPANY 




PIONEERING SINCE 

1942 

• 

(Zn cdtaMiiJhed claim 

an the 
JCatiAOA CU^ Aitvcket 

• 

for availabilities write 

O. R. Wright, Sales Manager 

Porter BIdg., Kansas City, Mo. 

• 

E. L. DILLARD, GENERAL MANAGER 



''^^ 1a *«»-** 







offices in Chicogo 

New York • Detroit 

Si. louis • los Angeles 

Son Froncisco 



JOHN 
BLAIR 




t COMPANY 

REPRESENTtNC LEADING RADfO STATIONS 



i*"*'*^'^*****'^ " 



DECEMBER 1947 



47 



SELL 



OUT OF 



CITY FOLKS IN THE 



SOUTH'S No. 1 STATE 



WITHIN OUR 



Primary+Area 



• WINSTON-SALEM 

• GREENSBORO 

• HIGH POINT 

2.5 MV/M 

MEASURED 
SIGNAL 



210,200 PERSONS 

$179,469,000 in Retail Sales 
$283,685,000 in Buying Income 

We Lead Day and Night 
in This Big Tri-City Market 



f d ' -HM& - J 



BMB DATA FOLDER 



j:'?i~W Vjr-Z. 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (^ 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



NBC 

AFFIUATC 

Natiofial R*»r*s«iit«Mva 

HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



"Now that the headache's over let's go to 
work." The direct traceable results of the 
page were millions in new billing for the 
agency. The first account to come into 
E, W through the ad was the Saturday 
Evey}ing Post. More recently, Deutsch & 
Shea, Inc., took a page to tell "A Truth 
About Advertising," and is presently a 
beehive of activity making presentations 
to new accounts. Accounts point out 
that it wasn't the use of full pages that 
started the flow of business in the case of 
Wasey or D&S but the ads themselves 
and perfect timing in each case. 

Sponsors' change of agencies inspired 
by newspaper or magazine advertising is 
less than 3 per cent of the annual turn- 
over of accounts. Advertisers like agen- 
cies to use space to sell the idea of adver- 
tising because most of these ads go into 
publications that reach stockholders and 
thus make it easier for advertising- 
minded executives to keep the moneymen 
sold on what they're trying to do. Space 
in Fortune and trade media is generally 
classified as "insurance" on accounts in 
the house. Despite the fact that most 
agency copy is apparently geared to 
straight selling . . . the straight selling 
keeps the business in the house sold. 

In a majority of cases advertising is a 
top-level matter with policy set by the 
board of directors. The board doesn't 
stop with policy either. In many cases 
the actual program is played for the 
policy makers in the board room and they 
make the final decision. This doesn't 
take the curse off a program that later 
fails to find an audience. The more posi- 
tive a corporate director is that a show is 
just right for his firm, the more he will 
blame the agency who suggested the pro- 
gram when it doesn't produce. Therefore 
programs that fail also have agency- 
changing repercussions. No matter who 
okayed the vehicle, when it bogs down a 
new deal is called for. Only the old-line 
agencies with plenty of director and stock- 
holder contacts have client relations that 
survive broadcasts that don't produce. 

Program stars have brought about 
agency changes in a number of cases. 
Before Bing Crosby signed with Philco 
there were four agencies that would have 
landed million-dollar-plus billings if 
Crosby would have signed with them. 
J. Walter Thompson's regaining part of 
the Ford broadcast account is directh' 
traceable to its being able to deliver Fred 
Allen. When Jack Benny threw the 
blame for a declining Hooper on Y&R 
some years ago and left the agency, he 
helped Ruthrauff and R\an land a solid 
piece of the American Tobacco Com- 
pany's business. Bob Hope, Edgar 



• ••••••• 

A STAR 
MARKET 

o///,e SOUTH 

* The People 

Combined: 1,000,000 
Urban only: 131,000 
Johnson City. .34,000 

Kinssport 33,000 

Bristol ; 30,000 

Elizdbethton. . .20,000 
GreenevilJe. . . 8,000 
Erwin 6,000 

* Radio Homes 

WJHL is the only full time 
regional station serving 
this dred. Thirty-tv^o BMB 
counties with 85,020 BMB 
radio homes. WJhlL is the 
"most listened to" in ten 
of its 32 BMB counties. 

* Buying Power 

Highest income bracket 
group in South. 
Richest and most thickly 
settled rural communities 
in South. 

* Industry 

Plastics 

Textiles 

Bookbinding 

Hardv^ood flooring 

Hosiery 

Rayon 

Silkmills 

Furniture 

Foundries 

And many others 

* Agriculture 

Tobacco: 100,000,000 
pounds sold annually 

Beans: World's largest 
market 

Dairy 

Poultry 

Livestock 

* Tourists 

Heart of TVA recreation 
area. Gateway to Great 

Smoky Mountains. 



John E. Pearson Co. — Reps. 
910Kc Ml. I H I 5000 WaHs 



Johnson City, Tennessee 
ABC Full Time 

• ****•**■ 



48 



SPONSOR 




DAVENPORT, ROCK ISLAND 
MOLINE, EAST MOLINE 



Only woe delivers satisfactory 
year-round NBC service to the 
Quad-Cities . . . the largest 
metropolitan area between Chi- 
cago and Omaha, and between 
Minneapolis and St. Louis. 
Approximately 218,000 people 
work and live here . . . make it 
the 40th retail market in the 
nation. 

5,000 Watts, 1420 Ke. 
Basic NBC Amiiale 

B. J. Palmer, President 
Buryl Lottridge, Manager 




Bergen, Fibber McGee and Molly, Walter 
Winchell, and a number of other stars 
whose programs regularly make the 
Hooper "First Fifteen" all are in the posi- 
tion of being able to move an account 
from one agency to another. When The 
Great Gildersleeve was lifted out of the 
McGee program family, the Needham, 
Louis & Brorby agency landed part of the 
Kraft Food Company account with the 
program built around the character. 
While, as indicated before, accounts that 
are brought to an agency through a new 
program can also be lost to that agency 
through another program, NL&B has 
held the Kraft business all along and ex- 
pects to continue to hold it as long as 
Gildersleeve continues to entertain an 
audience. 

One great danger agencies face when a 
new program is sold to a client or brings in 
a new account is keeping the client sold on 
the vehicle while it's attracting an audi- 
ence. As indicated in sponsor's report on 
Johnson's wax-selling on the air (January 
1947) Fibber McGee and Molly at the out- 
set was no ball of fire. If it hadn't been 
for agency partner Jack Louis' unique 
position with the S. C. Johnson Company 
sponsor, it is very probable that the 
agency would have lost the account and 
Fibber would have had to look for another 
bankroller. It's possible that the team 
would never have reached the top. 

Some accounts stay with agencies re- 
gardless of program or campaign. For the 
most part these are accounts which have 
interlocking directorates or where there 
are mutual financial interests in agency 
and account. These latter are not neces- 
sarily house agencies, which by agreement 
are forbidden to collect the usual 15 per 
cent agency discounts on business placed 
for their owners. No one is surprised that 
Coca-Cola stays put at D'Arcy, Listerine 
at Lambert and Feasley, Vick Chemical 
at Morse International, Barbasol at 
Erwin, Wasey, General Mills at Knox 
Reeves, Campbell Soup at Ward 
Wheelock, or Bulova Watch at Blow, to 
mention a few account-agency faithful 
twosomes. 

Such accounts are in the minority. 
There are a number of other accounts 
which stay with their agencies for a long 
time, or travel with their account execu- 
tives from agency to agency (like Conti- 
nental Baking which traveled from 
BBD&O to Benton and Bowles to Ted 
Bates with Ted Bates, who was its ac- 
count executive before he opened his own 
shop). Solid service and close personal 
and business friendships between com- 
pany and agency executives cement 
(Please turn to page 56) 



GIVOT 

"THE AMBASSADOR 
OF GOOD WILL" 




i 



LOOKING FOR SOMETHING 

NEW IN RADIO SHOWS ? 

HERE IS A SHOW THAT 

IS NEW AND DIFFERENT ! 

A OUARTER-HOUR OF LAUGHS, 
SONGS AND GOOD WILL 

feoturing the inimitoble style of 

George Givot 



FIFTY-TWO OPEN-END OUARTER-HOUR 
TRANSCRIBED PROGRAMS 



C. BRUCE KNOX 

Radio Productions 

FAIRMONT HOTEL - ATOP NOB HIU 

SAN FRANCISCO 6 CALIFORNIA 

YUkon 6-0224 



DECEMBER 1947 



49 



No. 4 



in a series , 



tough -minded 
examination 
of 1947 
radio values 
shows that 
CBS is the 
most effective 



networic 



CBS leads all other networks in delivering 
actual audiences at lowest cost to advert i>er-. 

CBS achieves this effectiveness by means ot 
superbly balanced facilities and completeness 
of coverage combined with CBS' ability to 
provide advertisers with programs that 
simultaneously win large audiences 
and deliver outstanding radio values. 

CBS does this with a "Package Program" 
operation unmatched in network radio. 

For example: "My Friend Irma" and 
Arthur Godfrey's "Talent Scouts". . . 
both CBS-built, CBS-produced . . . both 
in their first sponsored season . . . are 
ranked by NRI among the top-audience 
shows in all network radio. 

And along with this . . ."My Friend Irma" 
ranks third, "Talent Scouts" fifth, in 
number of homes deliveretl per dollar. 

The reasons why CBS is able to supply 
such performances for its advertisers are 
factually summarized in a new study. 
To see the study . . . 
And to get the utmost in radio values . . . 

SEE CBS... 

THE COMPLETE NETWORK 



December 1947 ^^y 


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Pit, I.MT 
Kfll°ii 


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Ton, Co. 


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p..,i... .i„„ 


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pl^p'w'tr 


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; 




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k.l, Sn.>lh 




"Cc, 


tt,»d,W.-..n 


K.., Sn.,rh 




,;!";:. 


A.nul>«|C«k- 
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s„. 


riX^ 


•p«l 

12:15 
12:30 
12:45 

-1 - 

1:15 
1:30 
1:45 




!...,.,«,. 


ruiu.Htw 


Bmi.-a»l. 


M.I— -P.. 


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Pll 

12:15 
12:30 
12:45 

-1- 

1:15 
1:30 
1:45. 


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L..H.S*., 


V»i«U»3lth> 


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Lr.«-S,-, 


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wl";r.r! 


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wr.'-.ll. 


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Lunclmo wilh 




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P*C-l..n 




a'.rJ,- (><,nuv« 


**^" 


B..S..In 
PtG>l>m Sup 


\»..Pu 


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c«. 


B.| Sulr. 


C»l... F..i» 
N...P« 






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Hf 


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P(C-OiHd 


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2:15 
2:30 
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3:15 
3:30 
3:45 

4 


„.^..,..d„ »-'•;»_'- 


BurfC—^. p.- 


arii,o.h>fP<>' 


P*,l.p M,.n. 


T«l.,-.l-h,ld..n 
Or-fl Mill.- 


Ckr, -P« 


""';«,; 




r,cr...l Mill.. 

^ pff^k 

b,).. .1 W.ld 
Gn....l M.1I. 


1.. m-Pv 

■-.:rif„ 


JndM...B-ri«.IOii"nU.II., 


C.«..l MJI.. 


t.-Lr. P.. 


"-';H 


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Uk..S.II... 
Pl«l.»M...i. ' 


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2:15 
2:30 
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3:15 
3:30 

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0««.l«D.,-P.. 


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j8,u,C,-k.. 


BuUititPti 


PmiMiw 

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= H.II,Sl.,n 
iB«il>(..U 

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B.ukk.„-P., 


P.mMiw> 


y l'..^k 








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S...1U1, 


0„<,l.,D.,-F. 


Bna. t G.«,« 


,:;ri., 


B'id. 1 Cmtn 
Si, .tin, 


Iwl, 






.w;.„ 


Mi.l.n Bl.k 
K B. S.ml.. 
)«..n(.,D., P.. 


'•:r;;™r 






HiFr> RhI Bh> 




(IS»>NO««nf,D.,P. 


rh..„o. 


„..rr 


M.rf>....rS.., 


M'.rt!ii«&™ 


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M.nh.l..„ faTp 


M....-HI«.k 








MMTtn. 


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jl>ri«B<B»yI 

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PiV^.iC 


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D.uhif » ^l)lKl^| 

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ps'cv'is^ 


^ ":".:"' 






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^ PMK.™„, 


.107) M 




'-9,„ 


r«.H<™ P«™. 


""'"l 


M. P«k.u 
PIGOiiM 


rm,.H-.P.,m 


.144) % 




"'■''"•liiu 


S<,.n.. 








bMoril F«>d> 


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'n^iTbI'™" 




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<ai;>' 


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o.».,m..»,. 

<irf H«>. P.n, 
CnutlElHtro 


SonI.I%l,.P,., 

Ph..™.- 


"'■'■Zs 


'sim"r 




Pb„m...,- 


pic'fl^,' 


c-w... 






*'»i3«"' 


- 


""^S 


C™.JD«lri. 


M,. r...... 


P»C.|.«, 


R.r»>l«. Ti*. 


C.E.H«„P.n, 




R-fhi It li>iw» 

PtCI.., 


""■1»?» 




^,h<l.ll.„i«.. 


R.,H,ld. T.I, 




R„Ki .. H.™.n.t 


R.rnol6 T>h. 




GuxulDtMiK 
II6IIH 


R.,hl 10 H.pp.n.. 












1 












1 


1 1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

M^ — 











December 1947 



^ 



4- 

m 
4:45 

5- 

5:15 
5:30 


"U'fZ^' 


>,«,,.(«,.» 


Hm.JMi''"' 


OuilM> 


Pud «>.««» 


KinlH^ 

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"7^" 


si-r 


'■cr; 


*1JP.»*K|. 


"■^JT- 


bck S>.|. Wf. 


""^r. 


H-»lHiH 


..1^^^ 


tr;r 


P..m,..n..n 


■"^?;c 


-'rr™ 


B.*.i...Wil. 

Mul«ft.4 
lltlW 


^rr- 


-UIP,^<m:<> 


i„,„,.™ 


B.ih>iil. WJt 
MoluF.,.! 




,:::;,:::, 






C«T««w >ft.A,ViH>M" 


,^^,.* 


3i.ll> OilU. 

SlHiM.PtuBip. 


p„ivm,.».. 




Si'U. Dillii 
Sl,H,n,-P1.i11». 
MJh W M.|. 


W.M»(W 


J,,hiu«Fti>U> 


Sl»l,n,.PKill.,. 


""w.II^oT 


].hiu« F.>nlt. 


Si. II. D.IUi 

S..,l„„-Ln.i,.f- 

llUlt 


"""r« 


|Jvn..« F.H..I. 


s..^i'l','&t^>- 


(MIIN 








liulihlfM.ll 


T™. iM-ft.. 




„'.:i-»i 


^t:, 


'luklr 


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.::-;. 


C«P 


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S.,hn,.B.,., 


1 — — — 


Tir 


L».r,i. J„, 


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:-;, 




"■"■■S;» 


H.nJ Sho- 


(«» 


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S.„lin,.Ph,U,,. 
M.lk,(M., 


„^;:;:::. 


„„ 


Mu.,..n. 


•j'-r 


WiMrrarnm 


'tr;." 


Widdf B..«. 




e«p 


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;l|>iJJ.. Bio.n 
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';;■,::,:■ 


T«>ihi..>i. 

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,:;;";::: 


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W.nd<. 


.t;;=. 


a, K.B,- 


,:■::::. 


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.r,n^i 


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SUNDAY 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


LLl!f>J:l.i:ili:i:!^I.M<H:M:i:}^i:i:14I.M«»Jii:i(^i:i:{»l 


Jil!k'J:i.i:i:l^«;i;MI;l;I«4:ia;il:i«JiJI;Ll«tJ;l.i:Liaj^ 


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6:15 
6:30 
6:45 

7- 

7:15 
7:30 
7:45 

8- 

8:15 
8:30 
8:45 
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M«<Mu».-P- 




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S«rMB-*u »'-V 


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Cii.iuiSion P»"«T»i.t 


Ciidihi Pi Ant 


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RkI B.it.. 


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t>w.l MdU 


ampb.llS«, 


luMuhXUl 






aR.rb.iiSw 




L™ Fl.1,,,, 
G.«..l Mill. 


Cin^llW 
ilSOlH. 


Arlhu,Ct«h 


tt<Liu|Mu>-C««R 




C.mfWI W 


Kiii.<.F..,.. 

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9:45 

10- 


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ibUntt.iiill. 
El™,O....P^ 


Aiu'iB 


Whil^ll *nt,m 


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STANDING OP 
VHVIR THE TEST 






O ROCHESTER 



(N.Y.) 



Tied for 9th place among all cities in U.S.A. 
In the 1947 Test Market Survey! 

Ranked 1st in New York and Middle Atlantic 
States among all cities of all sizes! 

Tied for 5th place among all cities in U.S.A. 
in 100,000 to 500,000 population group! 

Ranked 1st in New York and Middle Atlantic 
States in 100,000 to 500,000 group! 



O STATION WHEC 




Hooperatings show more people 
listen to WHEC than any other 
Rochester Station! 

This WHEC advantage holds good 
morning, afternoon and night— and 
has ever since Hooperatings were 
instituted in Rochester 4 years ago! 

Rochester and WHEC— What a Com- 
bination for a test campaign! 




*SOURCE— Fourth Test Market 
Survey conducted by "Sales Man- 
agement" magazine released 
Sept. 1, 1947. 

THE STATION THAT COOPERATES 




ROCHESTER, N.Y 



National Representatives: J. P. Mc KINNEY & SON, New York, Chicago, San Francisco 
DECEMBER 1947 




55 



Make Hay in 

North Carolina- 
The South's 
No. State 

- WPTF 

North Carolina's 
No. Salesman 




^41^^^^^^$ 



WPTF'S Primary 



Has More Farm Income 

Than Any Southern State 

Except 

North Carolina Itself. 









Gross Firm Income 


North Carolina . . . S712.604.000 


WPTF Primary 






640,895,000 


Kentucky . . 






490,285,000 


Florida . . . 






423,728,000 


Georgia . . 






419,583,000 


Virginia . . 






383,722,000 


Tennessee . . 






367,721,000 


Mississippi . 






333,528,000 


South Carolina 






259,925,000 




FREE O- PETERS, Inc , NalionjI Repr«jenl.tl»«» 



WHY SPONSORS CHANGE 

(Continued from page 49) 

relationships that withstand campaign 
failures. 

As long as there's a working under- 
standing between agency and client (as 
there is with most of the big agencies) 
the failure of a single program or cam- 
paign does not affect the over-all relation- 
ships since both realize that there is 
always the possibility of a campaign's 
hitting the wrong note just as there is the 
possibility of an advertiser's line not being 
geared to the market for which it is 
manufactured. 

However, most advertisers are not in 
the position of being able to take lightly 
the failure of an advertising campaign ot 
a product. Even an "inexpensive" radio 
program on a coast-to-coast network will 
cost $350,000 a year for time and talent. 
A national spot program with adequate 
coverage will run $100,000. In a great 
number of cases this kind of money repre- 
sents either the entire advertising appro- 
priation or a sizable part of the firm's 
budget (except of course in the case of 
industrial giants). Pressure on an agency 
is terrific, despite the fact as indicated, 
that more often than not the board of 
directors and the president of the account 
have okayed the campaign. No one can 
take the failure of a network or national 
spot campaign lightly. When a radio 
campaign fails, agency men rush in with 
alibis. When the story isn't good enough 
the client starts looking for a new agency. 

This is one of the reasons why some 
advertising agency men have welcomed 
the return of the webs to the program- 
package-producing business. As the oper- 
ating executive of one of the two top 
agencies in radio billing put it: 

"Networks have the facilities and the 
staffs to test programs. No agency has 
either facilities or staff adequate to assay 
properly the public interest in a show.* 
When we produce our own programs full- 
blown we become showmen with no place 
to sneak-preview our wares. The sooner 
agencies permit the networks to develop 
entertainment packages, the sooner the 
radio end of the advertising business will 
assume a little stability. 

"This doesn't mean that the agencies 
'mustn't live with the program once it's 
bought for a client. It doesn't mean that 
there isn't a great area in which agencies 
must work for a radio advertiser. So 
much agency time has been spent develop- 
ing programs that the commercial side is 

*\lhile Srhtrerin (SPOXSOFI. \tarch I9'i7). Calhip, 
/,fi:nrsfftd-Slnntnn. and nthrr svslrnis pretest pro- 
'jriinit. the ori/v sure test is (irliinl t}rfHidcasting of the 
pr'}tfr,irii fnr nt least a I. '1- week run. 



frequently given short shrift. The com- 
mercial is our business. The creation of 
the program shouldn't be." 

The reaction of one agency, Young and 
Rubicam, to CBS's package-building can 
best be appraised by the fact that it 
bought that chain's My Friend Irma and 
Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts. 

With some of the best research brains 
in business, agencies still admit that ad- 
vertising is at best only partially a science. 
Advertisers trust only success. They look 
upon their agencies as collections of 
creative minds. They know that very 
few of these minds feel any real affection 
for their firms — that in most cases good 
copy, art, and campaign men will and do 
shift when greener fields present them- 
selves. When they're forced to change 
agencies they don't worry too much — the 
programs and the necessary creative 
talent will go along with the shift. 

There is also a deep-rooted feeling 
among old-time advertising men that no 
account should stay too long with the 
same agency, or, if it stays at an agency, 
with the same creative group. Radio, 
copy, and art men, they claim, are worn 
out working too long on the same account 
and a new deal is called for regularly. 
That also accounts for some client moves 
from agency to agency. 

Asked why his corporation had a num- 
ber of small agencies handling his account 
instead of one of the big five, the chairman 
of the board of a great food organization 
said, "I've invested hours listening to pre- 
sentations from all the biggest advertising 
agencies. If I were to interchange the 
names of the organizations I am afraid 
that I'd never be able to identify the 
agency through its presentation. The 
big agencies, by and large, all come from 
the same can. You can't tell them apart 
if you don't keep the label on the can. 
We couldn't exist that way and 1 can't 
see having our advertising handled by 
carbon copies of successful advertising." 

Although Bill Lewis of Kenyon & Eck- 
hardt (rated as the most successful agency 
salesman in the radio field by his com- 
fjetitors) says that his formula is "get a 
piece of a big account's business, do a 
low-cost productive job for the client, and 
then watch the account grow," the fact 
remains that the great majority of adver- 
tising accounts don't shift that way. It's 
one agenc>'s failure, not another's suc- 
cess, that inspires account movements — 
and agency ability to handle the business 
unfortunately has ver\' little to do with 
the case. 

Too many executives have their fingers 
in the promotion pie. There's nothing 
constant in agency business but change. 



56 



SPONSOR 



BANKERS' MYSTERY 

{Continued from page 20) 

While the open mind is slowly replacing 
the hide-bound thinking of a decade ago, 
90 per cent of America's banking institu- 
tions continue to use no radio advertising. 
A considerable number of these are too 
small to buy radio advertising and an 
additional number are located in towns 
•which don't have their own radio stations 
or else have no radio outlets which cover 
the population that the bank aims to 
serve. Nevertheless, more than 50 per 
cent of the nation's 16,000 banks could 
use broadcasting. That only 1 ,600 do use 
it may be traced chiefly to the fact that 
most bank advertising men admit that 
the medium stumps them. To this 
ignorance of how to employ the spoken 
word on the air for selling banking 
services must be added the fact that most 
banks frankly don't know what they 
want to sell. In the American Bankers 
Association 1947 survey, ABA members 
■were asked what they expected from ad- 
vertising. Of the over 2,000 respondents 
1,000 said "sell" and 1,059 said "educate 
institutionally." While an institutional 
job and direct selling are not incompat- 
ible, advertising that achieves both at the 
same time is the exception, not the rule. 
One station sales manager after another 
comes back to his desk tearing his hair 
after trying to sell a bank on using radio. 
To quote one commercial station man- 
ager, "I find bankers hard people to talk 
to about advertising. I understand re- 
tailers and their problems. I don't under- 
stand bankers and their problems, and no 
banker I have ever talked to yet has been 
able to tell me what he wants his adver- 
tising to do for him." Another stated his 
gripe about bankers in terms of banking. 
He pointed out, "If bankers would only 
think of the broadcast dollar as they do of 
their investment dollar, in terms of money 
that will draw interest only if it's left 
where it is month after month, we'd all be 
happy. Instead they want to invest a few 
dollars in the medium and expect them to 
blossom forth in no time at all. They ex- 
pect results through consistency in their 
own business but they refuse as a group 
to be consistent about advertising." 

There are some banks which, running 
contrarywise to the general trend, have 
produced better than satisfactory results. 
The Northern Trust Company of Chicago 
has been on the air for 17 years. Its pro- 
gram, The Northerners, built along lines of 
the old Revellers singing group, fills a half 
hour weekly over WGN. Continuity of 
effort has delivered proved results year 
after year. The commercials are highly 

DECEMBER 1947 



effective despite the mixing of institu- 
tional and commercial copy. There is no 
heavy selling. The program does the job. 
The City National Bank of Oklahoma 
City, Oklahoma, is only the fourth largest 
bank in that city, but it's growing month 
by month. It has found that mysteries 
deliver good banking prospects and is now 
using The Shadow. It has employed news 
co-ops and 15-minute transcribed mys- 
teries like Philo Vance from time to time. 
City National spends one-third of its ad- 
budget in radio and another good slice of 
the bankroll promoting its broadcast ad- 
vertising. The bank advertising manager 



states his credo in the following manner, 
"Radio advertising can't run itself. 
Availabilities must be carefully checked. 
Opposition must be carefully watched, 
not only when the program is first spon- 
sored but throughout the entire run of the 
program, because in most cases competi- 
tion changes many times even during a 
13-week campaign. Banks must not get 
into radio advertising unless they are 
willing to spend enough to make certain 
of a good impression on the audience. 
Commercial air-copy must always sell 
bank services in small doses." 
Contrasting with the Oklahoma City 



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57 




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KNOXVILLE'S 

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wik 

Knoxville, Tennesee 

Represented by Donald Cooke, Inc. 



bank is the Fidelity Savings and Loan 
Bank of Spiokane, Washington, whose 
advertising manager states succinctly, 
"We prefer spots. We have tried pro- 
grams and don't feel they do as well." 
(Fidelity's spots are on KXLY and 
KFIO.) 

The Watertown National Bank, up 
near the Canadian border in New York 
state, has created a one-man documentary 
selling vehicle. Watertown lies in his- 
torical territory and the program gathers 
outstanding listening. It's endorsed by 
the schools and Chamber of Commerce. 
Local businessmen approve of it since it 
sells the area they serve to itself. Since 
schools, C of C's, and local businessmen 
represent a solid slice of a bank's pros- 
pects for depositors and borrowers, any 
local program that can attract them is 
bound to help a financial advertiser. 

Proof that banks do not need the insti- 
tutional and stuffy type of program is 
best evidenced by the broadcast adver- 
tising operations of two southern banks, 
the Rapides National Bank of Alexandria, 
La., and the Bank of Charlotte of Char- 
lotte, N. C. The former uses local high 
school sportscasts and wins the business 
of the students' dads besides influencing 
the future businessmen of Alexandria. 
The Charlotte institution does its best to 
avoid stodginess by buying an hour-and- 
three-quarters disk-jockey session on Sun- 
day afternoons over WBT. Only popular 
music is played; Carle, Lombardo, and 
Herman are typical of the disks placed on 
the turntable. Feeling that the type of 
music tells the story of a bank that isn't 
stand-offish, the commercials are institu- 
tional. There're plenty of mail requests 
for listeners' favorite disks. This is an- 
other case where the type of program does 
its own selling. 

Contrasting with the mass level of the 
Charlotte bank's use of radio is the pro- 
gram of First National Bank of Boston, 
Sunday at 4:30. This bank has spent 
$150,000 a year for three years to present 
the Boston Pops under the direction of 
Conductor Fiedler. The first year the 
commercial copy on the program was 
institutional. The second year the copy 
had a "free enterprise" slant. Currently 
it's using restrained straight selling and 
George Hicks-like tales of bank officials 
who have risen from the ranks. Since 
both the fine music of the Boston Pops 
and the First National are integral parts 
of the New England town, it's easy to see 
how they go together. The appropriation 
of the First National for radio alone is 
almost one-third larger than the average 
advertising budget of a bank of its size. 
This latter figure, according to the Finan- 



cial Advertisers Association, is $106,412. 
Among the 1,600 banks using broad- 
casting the program preference is for 
news, seven to one. Sportscasts run 
second.* This over-all preference for 
programs is verified by a recent (Octo- 
ber 1947) survey of the banks using net- 
work cooperative programs. The break- 
down, by program types, rdn as follows: 

BANKS USING NETWORK CO-OPS 



Proftram '1 


"ype 


Per Cent 


Newscasts 




«9.5 


Forum 




17.9 


Quiz 




8.3 


Current Affairs 




1.3 


Mysteries 




1.3 


Women's Commentary 


1.3 


Sportscasts 




1.3t 



Banks were among the earliest users of 
network cooperative programs. Fulton 
Lewis' first sponsor was the American 
National Trust of Denver, Colorado, over 
KFEL. They still sponsor him. 

Although banks have a long way to go 
to begin, as a group, to use broadcasting, 
credit must be given to the American 
Bankers Association for trying to educate 
its members to the medium. From ABA's 
first fling at producing a program for 
local sponsorship (during the same year 
that the banking group failed so miser- 
ably on the Blue Network — 1937) to 
date, the association has always served 
its members with either transcribed pro- 
grams or scripts. Presently they have a 
series of 52 five-minute transcribed pro- 
grams on the agenda. These will be used, 
they hope, as dramatic spots in local ly- 
produced bank programs. Most of their 
previous transcription attempts have re- 
sulted in deficits for ABA but they expect 
that this new venture will be in the black. 

A bank's greatest problem is to decide 
what it has to sell. Money is still the 
most difficult of all commodities to buy. 
Broadcasting is no help to confused think- 
ing on the part of an advertiser. It's 
direct and a personal medium. Because 
newspapers are relatively impersonal 
mediums, almost 100 per cent of the 
banks use them. 

Only 27 per cent of the small banks (up 
to $5,000,000 in deposits) use radio. This 
percentage rises to 83 per cent for the giant 
banks of over $400,000,000 in deposits. 
The rub is that there are 10,787 of the 
former class of banks and only 31 of the 
latter. 

Banks and radio have a lot to learn on 
how to get along with each other profit- 
ably. 

*/n a report to the ABA. 

t While preference is high for local sporlscasU. the national 
(nehmrk shoirs) broadcasts nf sporting etents do not 
hold the same appeal. 



58 



SPONSOR 



NIELSEN'S TOP TWENTY 

(Continued from page 28) 

homes are located in the following states 
in the following manner: 

State Audlineters 

♦Connecticut 18 

*New York 150 

New Jersey 65 

Pennsylvania 145 

West Virginia 21 

Kentucky 28 

Ohio 108 

Micliigan 77 

Indiana 53 

♦Wisconsin 34 

Illinois 126 

♦Missouri 22 

East and Midwest 847 

♦North Carolina 19 
♦South Carolina 9 
♦Georgia 13 
South 41 

♦Louisiana 14 

♦Oklahoma 22 

♦Texas 44 

Southwest 80 

California 127 

Washington 25 

Oregon 18 

Pacific 170 

Total audlmeter homes 1138. 

Because so many sponsors judge rC' 
search coverage by the sample located in 
big cities, Nielsen reports the location of 
his audimeter homes in big population 
centers as follows: 

City Audimeters 

New York 124 

Manhattan 32 

Kings 44 

Queens 22 

Bronx 23 

Staten Island 3 

Chicago 76 

Los Angeles 57 

Detroit 36 

Philadelphia 44 

San Francisco 27 

Pittsburgh 21 

Cleveland 19 

St. Louis 21 

Milwaukee 13 

Big city total 438 

Roughly therefore onc'third of Niel' 
sen's audimeters are located in 10 of the 
nation's top 13 cities. Baltimore, number 
7, Boston, number 10, and Washington, 
number 1 1, are not covered. 

This city rank order is based upon the 
last U. S. Census (1940). The population 
of these 10 areas represent 21,791,924 
individuals or 16.6 per cent of the 131,' 
669,275 recorded individuals in the 1940 
census. This 131,669,275 U. S. popula- 
tion is supposed to have increased to 
140,386,509 by January 1, 1946, and the 
increase in the top 13 cities is supposedly 
in proportion to the over-all increase al' 
though the West is recorded as having in- 
creased more rapidly than the rest of the 
nation. 

Thus 16.6 per cent of the nation is 
covered by more than 32.0 per cent of 

DECEMBER 1947 



Nielsen's audimeters. His other 68 per 
cent must cover 46.4 per cent of the na- 
tion, since according to Nielsen's state- 
ment he is covering 63 per cent of the 
U. S. A. 

The audimeter records on a tape the 
minute-by-minute use of the radio re- 
ceiver to which it is attached. It makes 
no attempt to give the number of listeners, 
nor does it report actual listening. It's 
merely a record of a receiver being turned 
on. Recent check-ups by advertising 
agency research departments indicate 
that this lack of definitive information on 
who is listening is not important for night- 
time ratings, since sets are seldom turned 
on at night without someone's listening. 
Similar daytime figures are probably 
somewhat inflationary, since housewives 
do turn on their radio receivers and leave 
them on over an extended period while 
listening only sporadically during the 
period. 

Selection of NRI homes, as Nielsen 
calls the families covered, is, as far as is 
humanly possible, based on stratification 
as to income, education, and a number of 
other factors which Nielsen's organization 
has found to be important. That this is 
almost impossible to accomplish in a 
broad sense, at least at present, is indi- 
cated by the fact that the first require- 
ment in placing audimeters must be popu- 
lation. When there are hundreds of 
counties represented by one audimeter 
each it can be seen that stratification 
other than for population is a tough as- 
signment. However, within the limita- 
tions imposed by size of sample, Nielsen 
does take income, education, etc., into 
consideration in installing his audimeters. 

Nielsen's "Top Twenty" is based upon 
average audience. Since the "average 
audience" rating figure is just one of the 
figures contained in the NRI "pocket 
piece" sent to subscribers it is important 
that it be explained. "Average" in the 
Nielsen use means listening in the average 
minute; i.e., if the program is 15 minutes 
in length the number of NRI homes 
listening in each minute are added 
together and divided by 1 5 to obtain the 
average for one minute. (Technically 
Nielsen may use some other and quicker 
method of arriving at this "average 
minute" figure but in effect this is the 
significance of this rating.) Other rating 
figures which Nielsen reports are "total 
audience," i.e., receivers tuned to a pro- 
gram at any time during its broadcast; 
and a rating figure which reports listener- 
ship in areas in which the program can be 
heard. 

The other figure which is released with 

*Slales covered only in pari by audimelers as indicated 
by both Ihe territorial and the population maps. 



THE KAY LORRAINE SHOW 

53 transcribed musical ]/i hours 
with special Christmas program 




Announcer, Frank Gallup 

"Songbird Kay Lorraine is scheduled For the 
biggest gal build-up since Dinah Shore" 

—WALTER WINCHELL 

"Kay Lorraine is the greatest modern song- 
stress" — QUENTIN REYNOLDS 

Write . . . Wire . . . Phone . . . 

3lwvtif S. Qaedman 

RADIO PRODUCTIONS 

19 East 53rd St. New York, N. y. 




[gW The Best Buy in 
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/(SO'S New 

5000 Watt Transmitter 
is Now in Operation 

• Another reason why 

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MURPHY BROADCASTING COMPANY 

5000 WATTS -BASIC CBS 

Des Moines 9, Iowa 



Kinssiey H. Murphy 

PRESIDENT 

Headly-Reed Co. 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



59 



THE JOE HERNANDEZ SHOW 

a 3.1 Hooper 

in 
OCTOBER ! 



Nightly . . . 3,000,000 listeners in 
Southern California, via KMPC! 

1,500,000 listeners in the San 
Francisco bay region, via KYA! 

Mr. Sponsor, or Mr. Account 
Executive, this is the show that 
delivers, six nights each week, 
throughout the year! 

The Joe Hernandez Radio Show, 
featuring Thoroughbred Racing, 
is available for the San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, San Diego, 
Portland and Seattle Markets!! 



The Bloodstock Agency of California 

954 So. La Brea Street 
Los Angeles 36, Calif. 

YORK 0373 




5,433,574 People 
REMEMBER what 

they hear on . . . 
PHILADELPHIA'S PIONEER VOICE 

WIP 

BASIC MUTUAL 



Represented nationally 
by EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



the NRI "Top Twenty" is the NRI 
homes reached per ad-dollar. This is 
arrived at by projecting the reports of the 
1,260 audimetcrs to the 63 per cent of the 
U. S. reported upon by NR 1 . No attempt 
is made to relate the number of NRI tapes 
to the area covered within the NRI terri- 
tory by any network. The total NRI 
area is used in each case. The cost factor, 
according to the Nielsen organization, 
takes care of the partial networks, i.e., if 
the network is small the total cost is less 
and this balances the low number of NRI 
] homes reported listening. Thus the 
I "homes-per-dollar" figure should be cor- 
rect. In reporting the NRI-homes-per- 
ad'dollar, Nielsen uses the "total audi- 
ence," not the "average audience." In 
other words, everybody who hears any 
part of a program is figured as a program 
listener when number of NRI homes per 
dollar is reported. 

Nielsen's "Top Twenty" without pro- 
jection is a report of the listening in 1,128* 
homes selected by Nielsen as representa- 
tive of 63 per cent of the nation's radio 
homes. The cost factor, included in the 
report, is the number of homes per dollar 
reached by each program listen in the 
"Top Twenty." There may be programs 
that reach more homes per dollar but 
which do not reach the "Top Twenty" 
pinnacle — the audience may be smaller 
but the cost may be even smaller than 
that. 

Nielsen's rating system is criticized 
because he is heavily weighted in the over 
500,000 population cities; other critics 
question his audimeter distribution. Ac- 
ceptance of NRI conclusions must be 
based upon the fact that Nielsen has been 
in the research field for a number of years, 
and has unquestioned integrity. It is 
noteworthy that he has built an organiza- 
tion to which clients have paid $40,000,- 
000 for reports. 

At the very least NRI gives an accurate 
report of sets in use in 1,128 radio homes 
located in areas including 63 per cent of 
the U. S. population. At the best it's an 
accurate index to the circulation of a pro- 
gram in the area covered. The truth, as 
advertising research men see it, is some- 
where in between the two. 

*The difference between this figure II7S and the I'lOO 
auditneters in use is accounted for by the fact thai many 
homes hare more than one radio receiver and therefore 
more than one audimeter. 



HOOPER'S FIRST FIFTEEN 

{Continued from page 29) 
people (1940 census) living in the 36 
Hooper cities. To this figure must be 
added the non-urban population which 
Hooper interviewers phone while covering 
their city areas. According to Hooper's 
field staff this roughly increases the popu- 



lation sampled by one-third (9,695,180), 
making the total number sampled 38,- 
780,722. 

With the average American family 
numbering slightly over four, this would 
mean about 9,697,000 families in the 
Hooper areas. Since 735 telephone calls 
are made each 1 5 minutes in the areas in 
which these families live, a quarter-hour 
program rating is based upon one call for 
each 13,194 families (735 into 9,697,000) 
In the case of longer programs the ratio of 
phone calls to population decreases and 
with a 30-minute airing one family in each 
6,597 is called. 

In the case of daily programs, of five to 
15 minutes, on which only one rating is 
reported for the entire week, 3,675 calls 
are made, each call representing 2,638 
homes. 

Hooper's ratings are based upon total 
homes, not radio homes, and are therefore 
likely to be a little lower than other 
ratings which are based usually upon 
homes with radio receivers. (According 
to the Broadcast Measurement Bureau 
90.4'^ r U. S. homes have radio receivers.) 

A question frequently raised by spon- 
sors and agency executives is how accu- 
rate a gauge of program popularity are 
Hooper's tabulations? 

Hooper not unnaturally has been inter- 
ested in this question also, and has com- 
pared the ratings which he makes in some 
83 city areas with his 36-city network 
figures that come out of the hopper twice 
a month. Nowhere has Hooper found 
more than a 0.6 difference between the 
reports from his 83 cities and his regular 
36 areas. This, research men point out, is 
below the normal permissible statistical 
variation. Hooper releases, with alter- 
nate refx)rts, a graph showing the plus- 
and-minus margin of error to which his 
reports are subject. With a daytime strip 
rating of 7 (average for a top soap opera) 
and the normal number of telephone calls 
made for a five-a-week 15-minute pro- 
gram (3,675) the rating is subject to a 
plus or minus swing of 0.9. In other 
words, the reported rating of 7 m ght, in 
fact, be a 6. 1 or a 7.9. 

Hooper reports to the trade and con- 
sumer press twice a month the "First 
Fifteen" nighttime network programs and 
once a month the "Top Ten" daytime 
programs. A report ma>- come as much 
as 17 or as little as II days after a pro- 
gram airing. The report issued on the 
18th of the month covers the first week of 
the month; the report issued on the 30th 
covers the third week. This is Hooper's 
greatest asset since it enables sponsors to 
ascertain quickly the popularity of their 
programs. 



60 



SPONSOR 



f 4ltet52iin 



{Continued from page 4) 

mittee whose objective will be to suggest 
ways of making a better alUaround BMB, 
we were very glad to be able to sign an 
unconditional subscription contract with 
the Broadcast Measurement Bureau. We 
have also re-signed with Hooper for the 
regular Hooperating service. We had no 
desire to "travel alone" but there were 
some matters to be straightened out, and 
we had to allow sufficient time for every- 
thing to be worked out satisfactorily. 
Everything now seems to be in apple- 
pie order. 

Next item. Our use of the recall tech- 
nique in presenting ratings for the World 
Series games was based entirely upon the 
practical problems involved in getting an 
estimate of the audience effectively 
reached by a broadcast that lasts several 
hours. The instantaneous or coincidental 
telephone survey is useful for most pur- 
poses, but we believe it is not as well 
adapted to the job of getting a line on the 
World Series audience as is the recall 
method, which enables one to get an indi- 
cation of the total number of people who 
heard any part of these long broadcasts. 
The mechanics or the mathematics of 
this are best demonstrated in the Nielsen 
studies. Nielsen shows the difference 
between the audience for the average 

. minute and the total audience for any 
given program — one being a momentary 
picture, moving minute by minute 
through the period of the broadcast, 
while the other is a cumulative picture. 

While we are talking about the con- 
tents of your November issue, I should 
also like to make some reference to your 
editorial on the relative importance of 
promotion, publicity and certain other 
phases of commercial broadcasting. In 
the radio field as a whole, promotion and 
publicity have perhaps not always been 

• given the important position they deserve 
in the minds of top management, but we 
like to think that Mutual was among the 
pioneers in correcting this astigmatism! 
Mutual has had a vice president in charge 
of promotion ever since Bob Schmid was 
elected to that position on May 1, 1945^ 
and a vice president in charge of pub- 
licity since Abe Schechter was so desig- 
nated on March 14, 1946. 

E. P. H. James 

Vp 

MBS, N. Y. 

A pp in charge of publicity is different from a pub- 
licity num with a title of vp. It was the latter to which 
tponsors referred in their protests on the lack of stature 
of publieity at the networks. 



BMl ^-^SAeO- 



Hit Tunes for December 

(On Records) 

A GIRL THAT I REMEMBER bmo 

Tex Beneke— Vic. S0-S497 . Victor Lombardo— M«i. 7269 
Tommy Tuckei — Col. 37941 

AS SWEET AS YOU C^esenO 

Art Lund— MGM 1 0072 . Freddy Stewart— Cap. 479 
Bill Millner— United Artist* 

FORGIVING YOU ^e ) 

rar:y^rare-^°'c.\^o'.|434\°Ve:Vc%^op^°r^^^^^^^ 

HILLS OF COLORADO °n'on) 

Guy Lombardo-D«c. 241 79 . Robert Scott— Mercury 3069 

I WONDER WHO'S KISSING HER NOW cm. ) 

Perry Como— Vic. 20-231 5 . Ted Weemt-Perry Como-Dec. 25078 
Rav Noble — Col. 37544 . Dinning Sisters- Cap. 433 

?eria^b?:n^-^rc^V;0^i°Ol\^r„^y°o°st''i;;;;?rs-^^^ 



LET'S BE SWEETHEARTS AGAIN 



(Campbell -Poraie) 



Margaret Whiting-Cap. 15010 .Victor Lombardo-Maj. 7269 

Blue Barron-MGM* . Shep F'?^d^^'"''"?*,,„,„„_vic 20-2591 
Guy Lombardo-Monica Lewis— Dec* . Bill Johnson Vic. XU-xavi 

Billy Leach— Merc* 

MADE FOR EACH OTHER >^~> 

Dick Farney-Mai-7273 • Desi Arnai-20.2550 
Maria Lina Landin— Vic. 70-7245 

MY RANCHO RIO GRANDE (Harwal-Oienon) 

Jack Smith-Cap. 473 . Shep Fields-Musicraft 522 . Dick Jurgens-Col. 38027 



(Marks) 



THERE'LL BE SOME CHANGES MADE 

r^. L CL »_r„l 17963 Peggy Lee— Cap. 1 5001 . Ted Weems— Dec. 25288 
^"dfeltd^°ie"r8|4/;iirWaller-'Vic. 20-2216 
Ambrose Haley— Merc. 6067 

THE STORY OF SORRENTO e- ^ 

Buddy Clark-XavierCugal-Col. 37507 . Bobby Doyle-Sig. 1 5079 



ZU-BI (Republic) 



e _« v.Mc Vie 20-2420 . Victor Lombardo-Maj. 7263 

S^y'ru'ckTr^ciL* ! Art Mooney-MGM* 



* Soon to he released. 



BROADCAST MUSIC INC. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE . NEW YORK 1 9, N. Y. 
NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



DECEMBER 1947 



61 



Si*€^]VSOR 




SPEAKS 

p.s. 

With this issue, sponsor introduces a 
new tradition in trade paper journalism. 
The stories printed on its pages will not be 
permitted to become dated. It's our duty, 
we feel, to keep you informed of every 
major development in broadcast adver- 
tising as it happens — even (or especially) 
if it happens to one of our stories. 

And so P.S. (page 12) was born. With 
this section, each month, sponsor will 
bring previous issues up to date. It will 
report, for instance, what happened to 
Teentimers on NBC (March 1947 issue). 
It will tell why Balm Barr and Carey Salt 
ceased to sponsor The Shadow (February 
1947 issue). It will report what happened 
when Revere Copper and Brass stopped 
Exploring the Unknown (April 1947 issue). 
This month After- Midjiight Audience 
(May 1947 issue) and Lister ine Loves 
Company (April 1947 issue) are brought 
to date. 

We feel it makes a good story better 



when you are kept informed of just what 
is happening day-by-day, when we con- 
sider every sponsor analysis a living 
thing and you are abreast of changing 
facts of broadcast advertising life — 
with P.S. 

Spot Needs a Name 

What's spot advertising? 

That seems like a simple question, yet 
most advertising agency men failed in a 
recent survey to answer the question 
correctly. 

The reason? 

It's the confusion between spot an- 
nouncements and the broad field of spot 
advertising. When a much-used word 
means more than one thing there's bound 
to be bewilderment. 

Paul Raymer recently surveyed the 
advertising field and came up with 
"selective advertising" as a suggestion. 

It's time for a new name. Sponsor will 
serve as a clearing house. What have you 
to suggest? Let's wipe out the confusion 
concerning spot. 

A new name will help. 

The Spot Figures Please 

Nowhere in the field of radio are figures 
more difficult to obtain than in the field of 
spot broadcasting. Nowhere in the field 
of air advertising are they more essential 
to sponsors and their agencies. While 
network figures are simple to chart, spot 
broadcasting, being scattered throughout 
the 48 states and Canada, can't be ob- 
tained by checking each station without 
prohibitive expense. 

N. C. Rorabaugh, through his monthly 
reports on spot business, has gone further 
than any other organization in reporting 
spot placement, but even his figures are 
only a cross-section rather than an actual 
100 per cent report. Every month more 
agencies and sponsors break down and 



okay the release of their spot advertising 
to Rorabaugh but it's a slow process and 
the results leave much to be desired. 

With this issue sponsor starts a Spot 
Trends report (page 24) based upon Rora- 
baugh and developed through an exclusive 
mathematical formula devised by a num- 
ber of advertising agency and network re- 
searchers. All that Spot Trends purports 
to do is to chart monthly spot business of 
the advertisers who report to Rorabaugh. 
In most categories the sample reporting is 
an adequate cross-section. 

Two answers to the industry's obtain- 
ing a truly representative report are 
possible. Most logical would be a move 
by the National Association of Radio 
Station Representatives to have its mem- 
bers (through whom the greater part of all 
spot business is placed) report their 
monthly business. Since the report would 
cover business that has already been on 
the air, the representatives would lose no 
competitive advantage by releasing such 
information. 

The other answer is one that lies with 
each sponsor himself. Every advertiser 
could notify his agency to report (after 
the fact) the spot advertising he has used. 
Since it is vital that each sponsor know 
what's on the air in every market, his own 
release of the information can bring him 
reciprocal facts of what the other firms in 
his field are doing. 

In either case an organization is in 
existence ready, even anxious, to correlate 
and report the information available, the 
N. C. Rorabaugh Company. Spot is a 
vital form of advertising. The more that 
is known about it, the more effectively it 
will be used. It's up to the National 
Association of Station Representatives to 
part the iron curtain. If this isn't done, 
it's up to the sponsors themselves to tell 
their agencies (as so many have done 
already)— "REPORT!" 



[ 



Applause 




Good Commercial Taste 

A number of sponsors this season have chosen to present 
programs with a minimum of advertising. This does not mean 
that the sponsors in question have decided to present their 
programs as public service vehicles. Rather, they have con- 
ceived the shows in such a manner that the program and the 
sponsor over a period of time will become identified with each 
other and will not require aggressive commercialism. Typical 
of this type of presentation are the Ford Theater and the 
Pause that Refreshes on the Air. The title in both cases is 
tied to the sponsor. Each has won critical acclaim for its 
advertising approach and while neither has achieved top- 
ranking Nielsens or Hoopers they have been building solidly 
if conservatively. 



Both sponsors have or will have other vehicles on the air 
and will use them for straight competitive advertising. They 
realize that radio can be used for selling and for goodwill and 
are using it for both purposes but not on the same program. 
Goodrich Tire set the pattern for goodwill programing last 
season (sponsor, May 1947) and it's spreading — for the good 
of radio and advertising and the sponsors who underwrite the 
presentations — ^as well as the listening public. 

Broadcasting is all things to some people and some things 
to all people. Ford, Coca-Cola, Goodrich, and an increasing 
number of barker-less sponsors deser\'e that extra round of 
applause that isn't heard in the studios or in the homes. It's 
the applause that's heard on the cash register, for not trying 
to do everything with one show. 



62 



SPONSOR 



UR CONVENIENCE IN ORDERING SPONSOR AT THE SPECIAL CHRISTMAS RATES 



One Sub. . 


$5.00 


ea. 


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ea. 


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ea. 


15-24 


Subs., 


$3.50 


ea. 


25 S 


jbscripl 


ions 


and more 


, $3.00 ea. 





Id SPONSOR: 
<s my gift fo:.. 

•ompany 

(ddress 



Name (please print) 



\$ my gift to:_ 

Company 

vddress 



Name (please print) 



(GOOD ONLY UNTIL DECEMBER 2S) 

And send me a bill 
for these tuhscriptiont 



(please print) 



Company 



X33T 



\i my gift to:_ 



}<ompany_ 
kddress 



PLEASE INCLUDE ADDITIONAL NAMES ON SEPARATE LIST. 



You may also enfer \ □ new 
my own subscription \ q renewal 

Name (please print) j gS part of thIs Order V 

to not enter my own ( 
tfbscription at this time ^ U 



"I Do 
J sut 



rmsT CLASS 

1 


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47613 


(Sec. 510. P. L. & R.) j 


NEW YORK. 


N. Y 1 

1 

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No Postage Stamp Necessary il Mciled in the United States 



2c. - POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 
40 WEST 52 STREET 
New York 19, New York 







miffXSOUTHERN YANKEE 




A Southern gentleman and a Yankee scholar . . . that's MEL 
ALLEN, winner for the second successive year of the Sporting 
News Award for his "outstanding play-by-play description of 
the Yankee Baseball Games on WINS." 

Now the versatile Mr. Allen turns to other records as he as- 
sumes the role of a disc personality on his own 2-5 p.m. daily 
program. 

The MEL ALLEN SHOW^ is important not only because Mel 
can deliver an audience — witness the 11,000 letters in two weeks 
he averaged on simple request for all star team nominations — 
but also because it's the first of the WINS new bloc program- 
ming format. 

Both listener and advertiser benefit from the AlEL ALLEN 
SHOW^ for it calls for long range planning and listening. Thus 
WINS continues its efforts to serve metropolitan New York to 
the fullest of its ability. 



CROSLEY BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



WIKS 



NEW 



YORK 



DRAWING POWER ■sxFTTnilr ' 




ABC Nefwbrfc CLLYtLAWU ^qqq ^^^,,^5 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY H F ^A OLEY-REED COMPANY 



•iS;^'" "" 



■V.N V 






v,C 




^Irepolitan Opera at Milton Goti, Tcxaco't announcer, viewi it (page 41) 



The Benrus story • Soft drink leadership • Spot Trends 
Selling the supplier • Oil and the opera • FM Market 



MiMcUtaUhuaBwJiij 




*. SPONSOR RE 

S...S*P&N$OR REPORTS.. 




JANUARY 1948 



U. S. RADIO 
TWO BILLION 
ANNUAL 
SPENDING 



CAMELS 
USING 
BIG SPOT 
BUDGET 



PETRILLO ' S 
SWORD OVER 
WEB HEADS 



RADIO 

MANUFACTURING 
FACILITIES 
CLOSE DOWN 



CBS 

BLOCK- 
PROGRAMS 



SPONSOR BUYS 
TELECASTING 
PUBLICATIONS 
INC. 



0. H. Caldwell, former broadcasting commissioner, estimated last 
month that America spent $2,115,000,000 for radio in 1947. His 
breakdown showed time sales of $350,000,000; talent costs $60,000,- 
000; electricity consumption $220,000,000; radio receivers (retail) 
$800,000,000; TV sets $120,000,000; replacement radio tubes $90,- 
000,000; radio parts $100,000,000; phonograph records $300,000,000; 
and receiver repairs $75,000,000. 

-SR- 

Caraels is largest user of spot announcements among cigarettes today. 
Other tobacco organizations are pouring cash into day and nighttime 
network broadcasting. Camels is also networking but is spending as 
much for announcements as for one of its chain programs. 

-SR- 

Petrillo (as SPONSOR goes to press) is following usual routine de- 
laying tactics on new web contracts. Tension is mounting at net- 
works. Preparations are being made for musicians' walk-out despite 
hope there won't be any. 

-SR- 

Closing down of number of radio factories is indication that present 
receiver manufacturing potential exceeds demand. Production was 
built to fantastic heights during war and U. S. won't buy all sets 
which can be produced. Hoped-for export business hasn't developed. 

-SR- 

To combat both local block programing and other networks, CBS, which 
developed "mood" (block program) formula, is going all out to block- 
program network. First indication of this is notification to adver- 
tisers that protection on time slots will end shortly. First all- 
out CBS attempt to block-program is Friday night, which now 
throughout the U. S. has grown to be sport-listening night, 
making CBS job more difficult. If CBS attempt to build Columbia 
ratings through comedy block-programing on Fridays works, block-pro- 
graming can be answer to that chain's fight for top audience ratings. 

-SR- 

Sponsor Publications Inc. has purchased the capital stock of Tele- 
casting Publications Inc., publishers of FREQUENCY MODULATION BUSI- 
NESS . SPONSOR will continue its established format and editorial 
content with added emphasis on TV, FM and FAX. Publication of 
FREQUENCY MODULATION BUSINESS has been suspended. Edward Codel, 
former president and publisher of Telecasting Publications Inc., has 
joined the Katz Agency Inc., national station representatives, as 
head of its new television department. 



SPONSOR, Vol. 2, No. 3, January 1948. Published monthly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 N. Mervine St., Philadelphia 41, 

Pa. Advertising, Editorial, and Circulation offices. 40 W. 52 St., New York 19, N. Y. Subscription $5.00 a year in U. S., $5.50 elsewhere. Acceptance 

under the act of June 5, 1934 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, authorized December 2, 1947. 

JANUARY 1948 1 



I in£rkl** iIm* Am • 






PONSOR RE PORTS... SPONSOR 



NBC TO LEAD 
IN HOOPER 
NATIONAL 
RATINGS 



TRANSCRIPTION 
FIRMS SET ON 
MUSICAL 
BACKLOG 



LOUIS FIGHT 
HITS COMPETING 
PROGRAMS 



YEAR-END 
NETWORK 
REPORTS 
GLOW 



50 KW FOR CFRB 
HELPS CANADIAN 
INDEPENDENTS 



STEEL COMPANY 
DONATES TIME TO 
COMMUNITY 



PROJECTS 



SOAP OPERAS 
ENDORSED 



ALL-NIGHTERS 

INCREASING 



Hooper's national ratings, which will be available some time in 
March or April, will give NBC programs, generally speaking, largest 
listening indices of any of four networks' shows. More NBC sponsors 
use full web and NBC stations, averagewise, are older and more powerful . 

-SR- 

All major transcription organizations finished pressure schedules of 
musical recordings under wire. Killing pace had been maintained 
until December 31, with one musical aggregation refusing New Year's 
Eve bookings in order to fill six recording sessions that day. Now 
e.t. organizations are prepared for Petrillo ban on recordings. 

-SR- 
ABC's airing of Louis-Walcott fight hit all competing programs. "It 
Pays to Be Ignorant" Hooper was down to 4.1, from 8.5. Spotlight 
Revue was off 5.0, rating 2.6. "Mystery Theater" rated 5.4, off 
6.5. Gillette-sponsored fight garnered 41.5 and was highest-rated 
regularly-scheduled program of 1947. It increased by 5.8 rating of 
"The Sheriff" which preceded it, sending it to 14, perfect indication 
of what good programs do to airings which precede them. 

-SR- 
Heads of all four networks look forward to '48 with optimism which 
reverses most network heads' approach to '47. While there were no 
feelings of cockiness, all being certain that there would be real 
battles for advertising dollar, there nevertheless was assurance 
that broadcasting would do its job and get its share. 

-SR- 

Canadian independent broadcasting (non-government) was given new 
hope during past month by CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corp.) grant of 
50,000 watts to Harry Sedgwick's CFRB. CFRB is first independent 
Canadian station to reach 50 KW. 

-SR- 

To guarantee premium nighttime spots for civic groups, Portsmouth 
Steel Corp. (Ohio) has purchased 6:30-6:45 p.m. on WPAY, Monday 
through Friday. Five to 15 minutes will be available to worth-while 
projects in station's area. Gesture will also serve to further 
employee relations. 

-SR- 

Study of "Big Sister" published in "Genetic Psychology Monographs" 
by Professor W. Lloyd Warner and Dr. William E. Henry of Social Re- 
search, Inc., indicates soap operas do have stimulating effect on 
listeners, both as individuals and as members of society. Most 
women listeners researched by Warner and Henry feel they "learn 
while they listen." 

-SR- 

Number of stations on air 24 hours daily is increasing at rate of 
one a month. Latest to serve its all-night area (which is many 
times a station's day or evening listening territory) daily is 
WCKY. Cincinnati, which started January 1, though it broadcasts only 
18 hours a day on Sundays. 

SPONSOR 



Today's Most Perfect 



Picture of Product Behavior 




S^^APLE DESIGNED BY 
..Or.RoYmondFronxcn 

i,,CHN>CAL ADVISOR 
for. Po"' U-^'^' 
PANEL CONDUCTED BY 
Audience SorveYV 




What every Advertiser wants to know! 



T he Oklahoma City Consumer Panel 
has been set up on a continuing basis and 
financed by WKY and the Oklahoma 
Pubh'shing Company to give advertisers 
and manufacturers the most perfect picture 
ot product behavior modern research 
methods can devise. 

The method, the products covered and 
the samph'ng were adopted after consul- 
tation with the country's leading agencies, 
advertisers and research men. 

Four hundred families, selected for 
perfect representativeness of Metropolitan 
Oklahoma City, maintain a day-by-day 
purchase record for some 40 commodity 



classifications, recording brand, size, number 
ot units, price paid and place ot purchase. 

Tabulations are issued quarterly, but 
special reports for longer or shorter periods 
are available at cost covering any phase of 
acti\ ity possible to obtain from correlation 
of the detailed purchase records and bio- 
graphical information available. 

Nowhere in the U. S. today is there 
available to advertisers a more sensitive 
thermometer and more accurate recording 
of product behavior. Write today, letting 
us know how the Oklahoma City Con- 
sumer Panel may be helpful in the solution 
of your particular problem. 



What YOU Can Find Out 
About YOUR Product! 

I, The number and percentage of" families 
buying your proJua in Meiropoiitan 
Oklahoma C^ity. 

X* The tomparative standing of your prod- 
uct with tonipeiiiive brands. 

^* The number of units, price and weight 
of all brands purchased. 

4* The time and place of purchase; grocery 
or drug store, independent or chain; 
department store; house-to-house dis- 
tributor; or other. 

This information on products in 40-odd classifica- 
tions is available quarterly. In addition special reports 
-ire available at cost. >X'ricc today for the reports- 
covering the specific products in which you are 
interested. 



WKY • OKLAHOMA CITY « 



. S. C. /iitliiatf 



0\\\H> AND OPERATED BY THE OKLAHOMA Pl'BLISHING COMPANY: mE DAILY OKLAHOMAN - OKLAHOMA CIT^' TIMES — THE FARMER STtX KM AX 
j K\()R, (OLORADO SPRlXt-,S - KLZ, DEXNER AND W IKK, PEORIA, AFFILIATED IN MANAGEMENT — REPRESENTED N.\TIONALLY BY THE K AT/ ACFNCY 

JANUARY 1948 3 



.LudaliuW th. ■ 



#. 



I n.^ 



IKWKW \^« 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

NEW AND RENEW 

PS. 

MR. SPONSOR. STEVE DOUGLAS 

SOFT DRINK LEADERSHIP 

BENRUS ADDS PROMOTION 

FM MARKET: JANUARY 1948 

SELLING THE SUPPLIER 

SPOT TRENDS 

OIL AND THE OPERA 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 

TO BUILD OR TO BUY 

TV RESPONSIBILITY 

THE WRITER ON THE AIR 

BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

SIGNED AND UNSIGNED 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 

TV-FM-FAX 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 




1 
4 
9 
18 
22 
27 
30 
32 
34 
38 
41 
45 
48 
52 
54 
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94 
94 



Publiehed monthly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Executive, 
Editorial, and Advertising Offices: 40 West 52 Street, New 
Yorkl9,N.V. Telephone: Plaia 3-6216. Chicago Office: 410 
N. Michigan, rdephone: Whitehall 3540. Publication Offices: 
5800 North .\lervine Street. Philadelphia 41, Pa. Subscrip- 
tions: United State« t5 a year; Canada S5.50. SIdkIo copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1947 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



President and Publisher: Norman R. Ulenn. Secretary- 
Treasurer: Elaine C. Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. Koebler. 
Associate Editors: Frank Bannister. Charles Sinclair. Art 
Director: Howard Wechsler. Advertising Director: Letter 
J. Blumenthal. Advertising Department: Edvin D. Cooper; 
( Chicago M anager I Kav Brown; (Ixis .\ngelcs) Duncan A.Scott 
ACo.,448 S.Hill St.; (San Francisco) Duncan A. Scott A Co., 
Mills BIdg. Circulation Manager: Milton Kaye. 



COVER PlCTl'RE: The air audience looks over the .ihoulders 
of Milton Cro!is at the opera each Saturday afternoon 



i III West Sgndl 



CONGRATULATIONS 

\'()u arc certainly to be congratulated 
on your December issue. It is literally 
packed with informative data. In fact, I 
would like to have two more copies, il 
you could send them to me. 

Harley B. Howcott 

Media director 

Fitzgerald Advertising Agency 

New Orleans 



1 would like to take this opportunity to 
tell you how 1 enjoy sponsor. When I 
was in New York last month for a BMB 
board meeting, I heard, on two or three 
occasions, the name of your book men- 
tioned. 

A. H. Caperton 
Advertising manager 
Dr. Pepper Co. 
Dallas 



1 would appreciate it if you would 
change the address for future mailing to 
my home so that I will not miss any 
copies of your esteemed publication and 
will have time to enjoy it in my leisure. 

Emery M. Lewis 

Executiie vp 

Brown & ^'xlliamson Tobacco Corp. 

Louisville 



I am gathering some information on the 
idea of "planned programing" or "block 
broadcasting" by radio stations. 

I am referring, of course, to the idea of 
stations arranging the subject material 
they put on the air in an orderly, planned 
fashion, for the convenience of listeners 
and of advertisers. 

I shall appreciate ver>' much any in- 
formation you can give me on the growth 
of this idea, its present development, its 
use b>- the major networks, and the 
names of any stations that have used the 
idea independently. 

John B. Mack, Jr. 

Director 

Public Relations Onincil, N. Y. 

SPOPiJSOfi reported on lih}ek Prnijrtiniing in its "Fait 
Farti" (./ii/.v IU^i7) and October Ii)'i7 issues. 



COMPLETE FILE WANTED 

Would it be possible to obtain a com- 
plete file of Sf'ONSOR for our agency 
library? Somehow in the travels of our 
agency copy, the library has suffered, and 
Mr. Evans particularly is most eager to 

{Please turn to page 6) 







WWSW delivers "More L. P. D." 
in Pittsburgh ! 

That's More Listeners Per Dollar in 
this rich industrial market you 
can't afford to overlook. 
These are the facts. * WWSW leads 
Pittsburgh stations in sports ... in 
public-service features ... in on- 
the-spot coverage of local events 
... in value for your advertising 
doUar. 

WWSW belongs on your station 
list. Allow us to prove it I 

♦ASK FORJOE for evidence! 



« 



Pittsburgh's Leading Independent Station 
Hotel Keystone. Pittsburgh. Pa. 



SPONSOR 




(KCMO '/2 millivolt contour map — 50,000 watts non-directional) 

Mid-America is many markets in one — metropolitan, urban and rural. And KCMO, Greater Kan- 
sas City's most powerful station for Mid-America, covers this entire area . . . reaching out far 
beyond the V2 millivolt contour to a mail area (based on first 3 months' operation) which includes: 



700 counties in Missouri 
79 counties in Kansas 
42 counties in Nebraska 
70 counties in Iowa 



19 counties in Oklahoma 
30 counties in Arkansas 

23 counties in Illinois . . . plus 
18 other states not tabulated. 



This is 150 counties more than the 213 counties in the V2 millivolt area. 

With 50,000 watts day, non-d/'recf/ona/, and 10,000 watts night, KCMO, 
and only KCMO, offers you one-station, one-rate coverage of this important 
industrial and agricultural area. 



.^^ 



National 
Representative: 

JOHN E PEARSON CO. 
• •••••••••• 

Base mop courtesy 
Broackasting Magazine 

JANUARY 1948 



KCMO 



Kansas City, Mo. * Basic ABC for Mid-America it^J u^at 




• • 



4 • • 



I '"<'■"■" 'fill' lh> WftT.»^ k.. 




GOOD MOSIC IS A HABIT Good music forms good listening habits . . . 
attracts music lovers . . . keeps them listening . . . knits them into an 
intensely loyal, responsive audience. More than half a million music-lo\ ing 
families in the New Y'ork metropolitan area time habitually to 
WQXR-WQXQ . . . comprise "A City Within A City" in the worlds richest 
and greatest market. A record number of advertisers, using the 
sales-producing impact of good music, are tapping this vast source of 
purchasing power. Their increasing sales are proof 
that good music is a powerful selling force. For 
greater sales, use WQXR-WQXQ . . . the stations 

distinguished for good music and the news ^„j ^ ^^ j;,^,,,,,, ^.^^^.^^ 

bulletins of The New York Times. Radio Stations of The New York Times 



WQXR 



(Cx)iUiyiu€d from page 4) 

have a complete file. Also, do you pro- 
duce binders for a year's file? 

Dorothy Ca.ntrell 
Account Executive 
Albert Evans Advertising 
Fort Worth 

Bark Utiut are trarct but the h'rani' agmey filet hate 
brrn hroiuihl up to date. .\o binderi am liable yel. 



(2) 



(3) 



TRANSCRIPTION CORRECTIONS 
Just a note to let you know how very 

much I enjoyed the transcription article 

in the November issue. 
A couple of corrections >'ou ought to 

know about: 

(1) Singin' Sam, not the Mullen Sisters, 
does the commercials in the Singin' 
Sam series. 

Captain Stubby and the Buccaneers is 
no longer handled by Transcription 
Sales. (Now distributed by Larry 
Fin ley.) 

Recorded announcements by talent 
on all Transcription Sales features are 
available for clients' use not only as a 
part of the programs proper but as 
spot announcements on the same and 
other stations in the purchased pro- 
gram markets. There's no addi- 
tional charge for spot use. 
On the Wings of Song series, Emile 
Cote and the Serenaders are avail- 
able to do personal appearances for 
clients in purchased program mar- 
kets. 
Again, congratulations on a mighty fine 

article in a mighty fine magazine. 

Edward Hochhauser, Jr. 
Eastern Division Manager 
Transcription Sales, Inc., N. Y. 



(4) 



LOCAL PROGRAMS 

We're sorcy that WKNA missed a list- 
ing in your November tabulation of ad- 
vertising by categories. Perhaps the 
questionnaire failed to arrive. 

Checking the tabulation we find that 
only San Francisco, Chicago, Yakima, 
Los Angeles and Fort Worth have across- 
the-board programs of 30 minutes or 
longer. We think that WKNA's accom- 
plishment in joining this list of large 
cities is noteworthy. 

The Valley Bel! Dairy of Charleston 
sponsors "The Valley Bell Swap Shop of 
the Air" Monday through Friday 12:30- 
{Please turn to page 12) 



SPONSOR 




e. A. RICHARDS 



HARRY WISMER 
Ant. to tht Prmt. 



JANUARY 1948 



iijan hi Ihr nmimn hi i "■ r J 




SPONSOR. 



new and renew 



yVe<t( /^aiioHai Spoi Bud^He44. 



SPONSOR 



PRODUa 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Block Drug Co 
Bon Ami Co 
Doublcday Co 

Emerson Drug Co 
Foster Mllbum Co 

Garrett Wine Co 

Hercules Powder Co 

Hudnut Sales Co. 

National Biscuit Co 
Hiels Bros 

Schenley Distillers 

Stanback Co Ltd 

Standard Brands Inc 



Sterling Drug Co (Whitehall 

Pharmacal dlv) 
William H. Wise 



Polygrip 
Cleanser 
Dollar Book Club 

Bromo-Seltzer 
Doan's Pills 

Virginia Dare wines 

Texctone 

Rayve Shampoo 

Shredded Wheat 
Plel's Light Beer ; 

Wines 

Stanback headache 

powders 
Chase & Sanborn 

coffee 
Bluebonnet 

Margarine 
Anacin 

Books 



Cecil & Presbrey 12 

BBD&O 12-15 

Huber Hoge & Son 20-30 

BBD&O ^^ 40 

Street &' Finney 20-50 

Ruthrauff & Ryan , 20 

Fuller, Smith & Ross 10-15 

Roche. WlUlams & 25-30 

Cleary 

McCann-Erlckson 25-50 

William p;sty 5-10 

Biow 25-40 

Piedmont 60 

J. Walter Thonipson 5-10 

Ted Bates 50 

Dancer-Fitzgerald- 15-20 

Sample 

Huber Hoge & Son 30-40 



K.t. spots; Jan 1; 13 wks 

Spots in women's participations; Feb 1; 13-52 wks 
15-min spot program; Jan 15; 13 wks (with 2-wk can- 
cellation clauses) 
E.t. spots, breaks; Feb-Mar; 8-52 wks 
E.t. spots, breaks In expanding campaign In rural 

markets; Jan 1; 52 wks 
E.t. spots, breaks In nighttime availabilities; Jan 15; 

13 wks 
Early a.m. spot programs in southern markets; Feb 

1; 13-52 wks 
E.t. spots, breaks, local programs; (expanding current 

campaign) Jan 15; 13-52 wks 
Spot programs, morning hours; Feb 1; 13-39 wks 
E.t. spots in expanding campaign In southeastern 

markets; Jan 15; 52 wks 
5-mln e.t. programs in nighttime availabilities; Feb 

1; 13 wks 
Peter Donald. 15-mln e.t.; Feb-Mar; 13-52 wks 

E.t. spots in test campaign (may expand later); Jan 

1-15; 13 wks 
E.t. spots; Jan 12; 9 wks 

E.t. spots, breaks; Jan-Fcb; 13 wks 

15-min spot programs; Jan 15; 13 wks (with 2-wk can- 
cellation clauses) 



AfeuA On ^eiuPH^Uu 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Appalachian Coals Inc 
Brotherhood of Railway 

Trainmen 
'Champion Spark Plug Co 
Famsworth Radio & Television 

t;orp 
Ferry- Morse Seed Co 
Ford Motor Co 
General Electric Co 
Lambert Pharmacal Co. 
Ludens Inc 
PhUip Morris & Co Ltd Inc 



Haehnle 

William Von Zehle 

MacManus, John & Adatns 
Warwick & Legler 

MacManus, John & Adams 
J. Walter Thompson 
Young & Rubicam 
Lambert & Feasley 
J. M. Mathes 
Biow 



MBS 


75 


ABC 


105 


ABC 


215 


ABC 


82 


CBS 


161 


NBC 


162 


CBS 


161 


CBS 


165 


CBS 


67 


NBC 


160 



Alvin Heifer News; MTWTF 7:15-7:20 pm; Dec 1; 52 wks 
Dorothy Fuldhelm News; Sat 5:45-6 pm; Nov 15; 52 wks 

Champion Roll Call; Fri 9:55-10 pm; Jan 2; 12 wks 
Metropolitan Auditions of the Air; Sun 4:30-5 pm; Jan 

4; 20 wks 
Garden Gate; Sat 10-10:15 am; Jan 17; 16 wks 
Fred Allen; Sun 8:30-9 pm; Jan 4; 52 wks 
House Party; MTWTF 3:30-3:55 pm; Dec 1; 52 wks 
Abe Burrows; Sat 7:45-8 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 
Strike It Rich; Sun 10:30-11 pm; Nov 2; 52 wks 
Horace Heidt; Sun 10:30-11 pm; Dec 7 



* Extended contract. 
(Fifty-two icfekt generally meant a 13-week contract with optiom for 3 luceetiive 13-XDeek renewalt. It't luhject to cancellation at the end of any 13-week period) 



HeHe44MiU On Aetwo^Ju 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Express Co 
Anchor-Hocking Glass Corp 
Armour & Co 
Bristol-Myers Co 

Colgate-Palmollve-Peet Co 



Continental Baking Co 
Curtiss Candy Co 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & 
Co Inc 

F. W. Fitch Co 



'ANUARY 1948 



J. M. Mathes 

W'illiam H. Weintraub 

Foote, Cone & Belding 

Young & Rubicam 

Doherty, Clifford & Shenfield NBC 

Ted Bates 



Sherman & Marquette 



Ted Bates 
C. L. Miller 
BBD&O 

L. W. Ramsey 



ABC 


161 


CBS 


144 


MBS 


197 


NBC 


134 


NBC 


133 


NBC 


141 




142 




150 


NBC 


70 




^ 141 


CBS 


47 


CBS 




NBC 


147 


NBC 


158 



.^*>^*..A w^rtiWrt '^'->'^j«j(yfrV»MC'^N'''Vr^^«C9j:?HW*««C«pflR:^e9Sa?p5953??^^^ 




Vox Pop; Wed 8:30-9 pm; Dec 31 ; 13 wks 

Crime Photographer; Th 9:30-10 pm; Nov 1; 52 wks 

Oueen for a Dav; TTh 2-2:30 pm (alt 15 min); Dec 2; 13 wks 

Duffy's Tavern: Wed 9-9:30 pm; Dec 24; 52 wks 

Mr. District Attorney; Wed 9:30-10 pm; Dec 24; 52 wks 

Can You Top This?: Fri 8:30-9 pm; Jan 2; 52 wks 

Kay Kyser; Sat 10-10:30 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 

Dennis Day; Wed 8-8:30 pm; Jan 7; 52 wks 

Sports Newsreel of the Air; Fri 10:30-10:45 pm; Jan 2; 

52 wks 
Judy f^nova; Sat 9:30-10 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 
Grand Slam; MTWTF 11:30-11:45 am; Nov 24; 52 wks 
Warren Sweeney News; SS 11-11:05 am; Dec 28; 52 wks 
Cavalcade of America; Mon 8-8:30 pm; Dec 22; 52 wks 

Fitch Bandwagon; Sun 7:30-8 pm; Dec 28; 52 wks 




SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATION 



PROGRAM, lime, start, duration 



f General Foods (>>rp 
Andrew Jerftens Co 

LeTer Bros Co (Thomas J. 

Lipton Inc div) 
Manhattan Soap Co 



Minnesota Valley Canning Co 
National Biscuit Co 

Ncstlo's Milk Products Inc 
Norwii-h Pharmacal Co 
Radio Hlblo ClaNN Inc 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co 



Sealtest Inc 
Standard Brands 

Sterllnt Drug Co 



Sun Oil Co 

Tillamook County Creamery 

Assoc 
Wesson OU & Snowdrift Sales 

Co Inc 
Wesdnfthousc Electric Corp 
William Wrldley Jr Co 
Young People« Church of the 

Air 



Benton & Bowles 
Robert W. Orr 

Young & Rublcam 

Duane Jones 



Leo Burnett 
McCann-Erlckson 

Compton 

Lawrence C. Gumblnner 
Stanley G. Boynton 
William Esty 



McKee & Albright 
J. Walter Thompson 

Dancer-Fitzgerald -Sample 



Pedlar & Ryan 

Roche, Williams & Cleary 

Botsford. Constantlne & 

Gardner 
Kenyon & Eckhardt 

McCann-Erlckson 
Ruthrauff & Ryan 
Erwln. Wasey 



MBS 


110 


ABC 


218 




210 


CBS 




CBS 


160 




159 


NBC 


160 


ABC 


234 


ABC 


202 


AB<: 


136 


MBS 


250 


ABC 


236 


NBC 


151 




148 


NBC 


75 


NBC 


144 




143 


ABC 


202 


NBC 


140 




141 




141 


CBS 


147; 


NBC 


33 


NBC 


7Pac 


ABQ 


185 


ABC 


199 


CBS 


152 


MBS 


253 



Juvenile Jury; Sun 3:30-4 pm; Dec 7; 52 wk« 
Walter WInchell; Sun 9-9:15 pm; Dec 7; 52 wks 
Louella Parsons; Sun 9:15-9:30 pm; Dec 7; 52 wks 
Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts; Mon 8:30-8:55 pm; Dec 

29; 52 wk« 
Romance of Evelyn Winters; MTWTF 10:30-10:45 am; 

Nov 17; 52 wks 
Rose of My Dreams; MTWTF 2:45-3 pm; Nov 17; 52 wks 
Fred Waring; FrI 10-10:30 am; Jan 16; 26 wks 
Paul Whiteman Club; MTWTF 3:30-3:45 pm; Dec 29; 

Paul Whiteman Club; MTWTF 4-4:15 pm; Dec 29; 13 wks 

Fat Man; FrI 8-8:30 pm; Feb 13; 52 wks 

Radio Bible Class; Sun 10-10:30 am; Dec 28; 52 wks 

Paul Whiteman Club; MTWTF 3:45-4 pm; Dec 29; 13 wks 

Bob Hawk; Th 10-10:30 pm; Jan I; 52 wks 

Grand Ole Opry; Sat 10:30-11 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 

Village Store; Th 9:30-10 pm; Jan 1; 52 wks 

One Man's Family; Sun 3:30-4 pm; Jan 4; 52 wks 

Charlie Mcfjirthy; Sun 8-8:30 pm; Jan 4; 52 wks 

Bride and Groom; MTWTF 2:30-3 pm; Jan 5; 52 wks 

Walt! Time; Fri 9:30-10 pm; Jan 23; 52 wks 

Manhattan Mcrry-Go-Round; Sun 9-9:30 pm; Jan 25; 

52 wks 
American Album of Familiar Music; Sun 9:30-10 pm; 

•Tsri 25* 52 wks 
Big Town; Tu 8-8:30 pm; Dec 30; 52 wks 
Sunoco Three Star Extra; MTWTF 6:45-7 pm; Jan 19; 

52 wks 
Tillamook Kitchen; Sat 9:45-10 am pst; Jan 3; 52 wks 

Paul Whiteman Club; MTWTF 4:15-4:30 pm; Dec 8; 

15 wks ^"""^^ 

Ted Malone; MTWTF 11:45-12 am; Dec 29; 52 wks 
Gene Autry; Sun 7-7:30 pm; Dec 28; 52 wks 
YounC Peoples Church of the Air; Sun 9-9:30 am; Nov 

30 ; 52 « ks 



A/e44f. cutd Ho^taim^d 04t ^^UidUoH. 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATION 



PROGRAM, lime, start, duration 



American Tobacco Co 
Peter Ballantlne & Sons 

The Boston Store 

Botany Worsted MlUs 



Foote. Cone & Belding 
J. Walter Tliompson 

Mark Mautner & 

Berman 
SUbcrstcin-Goldsmith 



Broadway House of Music Direct 

Bulova Watch Co Blow 

General Foods Corp (Sanka) Young & Rublcam 

A. Gettelman Brewing Co Scott-Tclander 



Gimbels (Milw.) 
Glrard Chevrolet Co 
Hat Research Foundation 



Robinson Lloyds Ltd 

(wines) 
Perma-Stone Corp 
Powell-Campbell Shoe Co 
Ed Schuster Stores 
Sears- Roebuck 

Socony- Vacuum OU Co 

(Wadbam dlv) 
Transmirra Products Corp 

Trilling & Montague 

(Norge dealers) 
Wfstern Fuel Co 



Direct 

Edward Shapiro 

Grey 



Wiley, Frazee & 

Davenport 
Direct 
Sterling 

Cramer- Krasselt 
Mayers 

Scott-Telander 

Smith, Bull & 

McClreery 
Campbell-Ewald 

ScDtt-Telunder 



WCBS-TV, N. Y. 
WABD, N. Y. 

WTMJ-TV, MUw. 

WTMJ-TV, Milw. 
WABD, N. Y. 
WTMJ-TV, Milw. 
WTMJ-TV, MUw. 
WABD, N. Y. 
WTMJ-TV, Milw. 

WTMJ-TV, Milw. 
WFIL-TV, Phila. 
KTLA, L. A. 
WCBS-TV, N. Y. 

WABD, N. Y. 

WTMJ-TV, MUw. 
WABD, N. Y. 
WTMJ-TV, MUw. 
KTLA, L. A. 

WTMJ-TV, MUw. 

WABD, N. Y. 
WTTG. Wash. 
WFIL-TV, Phlla. 

WTMJ-TV, Milw. 



Film spots following news, preceding sports; Dec 29; 13 wks (r) 
N. Y. Yankees baseball games; as scheduled; April thru Sept; 

21 wks (n) 
How to Do It; Sun 8:45-9 pm; Dec 7; 13 wks (n) 

Weather spots; Dec 3; 13 wks (n) 

Weather spots; Dec 17; 11 wks (r) 

High school basketball games; Fri 7:55-10 pm; Dec 5; 13 wks (n) 

Time signals; Dec 3; 52 wks (n) 

Spots; Jan 1 ; 8 wks (r) 

Wrestling matches; Th 8:30-10:30 pm; Dec 4; 13 wks (n) 

Sports Parade (Blm); Sat 8:15-8:30 pm; Dec 10; 13 wks (n) 

Television Newsreel; Sun 8:15-8:30 pm; Dec 7; 13 wks (n) 

Spots, preceding and following TV sports; Nov 14; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots; Dec 13; 13 wks (n) 

Film spots, before and after Madison Square Garden events; 

Dec 20; 6 wks 
Spots; Dec 9; 12 wks (n) 

Boxing matches; as scheduled; Dec 10; 13 wks (n) 

Spots; Jan 6; 52 wks (n) 

Schuster's Open House; Wed 8-8:15 pm; Dec 3; 52 wks (n) 

Spots in "Shopping at Home": Sun 8:40-9 pm; Nov 14; 52 wks (n) 

Spots; as scheduled; Dec 8; 52 wks (n) 

Marquette U. basketbaU games; Sat 8:30-10 pm; Dec 13; 13 

wks (n) 
Spots in "Small Fry"; Tu 7-7:30 pm; 13 wks (n) 

Phila. Warriors basketball games; as scheduled; Nov 31; to 

Mar 18 (n) 

Spots; Dec 4; 13 wks (n) 



Ne44A A<f€HC4f /lpfiaUiUM/e4ii4. 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



Academy Theatres, L. A Movie chain 

Allda Products Co, Tujunga, Calif Cosmetics 

American Frigid-Dough Inc, Oak Park, lU Frozen Ready-to-Bake Pastries. . , 

American-Marietta Co, Chi Paint, asphalt products 

Appalachian Coals Inc, Clncl Coal 

Arnold Bakers Inc, Port Chester, N. Y. Raisin tea loaf 

Associated Products Inc, Chi Cosmetics, toiletries 

Hroadway-.Spring Arcade Building Corp, L. A Cooperative merchants 

Urock ik Co. Phlla Frozen French Fried Potatoes 

lirown Brothers Ltd. Toronto Stationers 

<Uilifomla Dew Distilling Co. L. A Orange wine 

Cella Vineyards, Fresno, t^lif Wine 

Chicopee Mfg Corp (Lumite dlv), N. Y Lumlte screening, plaatlc fabrics. 

<;ircus Foods Inc, S. F Circus Peanuts 

Claridge Food Co, N. Y Meat products 

Coast Van & Storage Co, L. A Moving & storage 

C<ilgiite-Palmollve-Peet Co, Jersey City Lustre-Creme Shampoo 

C«H)perative Mattress Assn, L. A Institutional 

Craig OU Co, Oakland ... Petroleum products 



Tullis, H'wood. 

A. James Rouse, L. A. 

Swanev, Drake & IJement, Chi. 

Ruthrauff & Ryan. C:hl. 

Haehnle. Clncl. 

Walter Weir. N. Y. 

Norman A. Mack. N. Y. 

Charles .\. Stahl. L. A. 

Richard A. Foley, Phila. 
. Vlckers & Benson. Toronto 

Harry J. Wendland. L. A., for natl adv 

McNeill & -McCIeery. L. A. 
. Geyer. Newell & Ganger, N. Y. 

BBD&O. S. F. 

Al Paul Lefton. N. Y. 

Irwin-McHugh, H'wood., for regl adv 

Lennen & Mitchell, N. Y. 

John Freiburg. L. A. 
.TuUu, H'wood. 



{Please turn to page 62) 



t 



t 




/^\'-<:^ -v"- 



IT TAKES 
MORE THAN 





M 



^* 



^ 



to dttrdct dnd hold 
an dudience/ 




^/>w-/<?»M coi//ifTm*f?^!/!^^ 



People listen to certain radio stations more 
than others because they like what they hear. 

For example, Des Moines has four* radio sta- 
tions, each of which has daytime coverage 
throughout the nine counties emphasized on 
the map at the right. In addition other sta- 
tions "come in" with sufficient strength to 
warrant very considerable audiences. 

Normally you might expect Vi HO to get 25% 
of the audience in these nine counties. The 1947 
Iowa Radio Audience Survey shows, from 5:00 
a.m. through 6:00 p.m., WHO^s 9-county ai'er- 
age percentage of all radio listening is 66.4% ! 

There is only one answer to such listener-pref- 
erence. That answer is Top-Notch Program- 
ming — Outstanding Public Serrice. Vi rite for 
your copy of the 1947 Iowa Radio Audience 
Survey and see for yourself. 




*At the time of the 1947 Iowa Radio Audience 
Survey — May, 1947. 

JANUARY 1948 



WHO 

*for Iowa PLUS + 

DES MOINES . . . 50,000 \^ ATTS 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident -Manager 

FREE & PETERS, INC, National Representatives 



11 



„J^.,.. II..I it^ „.„„.„ K.. . ,.~..l 




V AfS 



THE AIRLANE TRIO 

"Good listening music" — in the 
inimitable style of The Airlane 
Trio — Hammond Organ, Ac- 
cordion and Guitar — is avail- 
able for 



FM 



through Lang-Worth exclusive- 
ly. Other outstanding features 
in Lang-Worth's Service of 
4000 high-fidelity selections 
include: 

D'Artega and the Cavalcade of 
Music, Vaughn Monroe, The 
Silver Strings, Blue Barron, Lew 
White, The Emile Cote Glee 
Club, Los Amigos Pan Ameri- 
canos, Chiquito, Chuck Foster 

. . . The Lang-Worth Sym- 
phony, Anita Ellis, Szath-Myri, 
Bertrand Hirsch, Harry Hor- 
lick, The Lang-Worth Choris- 
ters, Claude Thornhill 

. . . Tommy Dorsey, Foy Will- 
ing, Count Basie, Shep Fields, 
Joan Brooks, Howard Barlow, 
Johnny Thompson, Frankie 
Carle, "Dinner Music" 

. . . and many more. 



LANG-WORTH 

INCORPORATED 
113 W. 57th St., New York 



1 4l|-Wk SBiKl ] 



1 :()() p.m. on WKNA. Ninety per cent 
()( the mail received at the station by this 
pn)<jram bears the name of the sponsor. 

Frank E. Shaffer 

Program director 

WKNA, Charleston, W. Va. 



First, let me say that I believe sponsor 
offers the most interesting radio trade 
news of any publication on the market 
today. We think it's doing a most re- 
markable job. I've only found one 
instance of sponsor slipping up, and I am 
ready to admit it may not be your fault. 

In the November issue, you present an 
index of locally-produced programs avail- 
able for sponsorship. In the Middle 
Atlantic section, WCAE is not repre- 
sented despite the fact (although I hate to 
admit it) that we, too, have a few pro- 
grams available for sponsorship. 

I personally can't recall being con- 
tacted by sponsor for information. I am 
ready to admit, as I said before, that per- 
haps any questionnaire you may have 
sent might have been mislaid or lost here 
at the station; or didn't you contact the 
station for information. 

I realize it's too late for inclusion, but I 
would appreciate being included in any 
further similar indices. 

John Wilkoff 
Promotioyi manager 
WCAE, Pittsburgh 



I found the issue of sponsor with The 
Ohio Story more interesting than The 
Philadelphia Story. 

John F. Royal 

Vb 

NBC, N. Y. 



That article you had on page 39 plus in 
the September issue of sponsor, dealing 
with the problem of VV'/iaf's Wrong With 
Insurance Advertising?, was a peach. 

We would like to get it into the hands 
of insurance companies in Canada and 
wonder if there is an\ wa\ by which we 
could obtain about 50 reprints. Or, fail- 
ing that, sufficient tear sheets from copies 
of the magazine. What would the charge 
be? 

You have a dand\ magazine and there 
is a lot of good, useful selling material in 
it. Keep it coming. 

A. A. McDermott 
Horace N. Stovin & Cj). 
Toronto 
{Please turn to page 14) 



COVERING 


KEY METROPOLITAN 


MARKET AREAS 


WKAP 


Allcntow n 


KVET 


.\ustiii 


WSID 


Baltiinorr 


WORL 


Boston 


WEAK 


Charleston, S. C. 


WTIP 


Charleston, W. Va, 


WGTL 


Charlotte 


WSBC 


Chicago 


KSIX 


Corpus Christi 


WJBK 


Detroit 


WBBC 


Flint 


KNUZ 


Houston 


WLAN 


Lancaster 


KWKW 


Los Angeles 


WCCM 


1 .owcli - Lawrence 


WNEX 


Macon 


WHHM 


Memphis 


WMIE 


Miami 


WMLO 


Milwaukee 


WMIN 


Minn. -St. Paul 


WBNX 


New York 


WLOW 


Norfolk 


WDAS 


Philadelphia 


KARV 


Phoenix 


WWSW 


Pittsburgh 


WRIB 


Providence 


KXLW 


St. Louis 


KONO 


San Antonio 


KUSN 


San Diego 


KEEN 


San Jose 


KFMJ 


Tulsa 


CKNW 


\ an('()U\«'r. B. C. 


WWDC 


Wash.. D. C. 


WHWL 


\\ ilke."i-Barre 


WTUX 


W ilmington 


For joe 


& Company 


Nation 


si Representatives 


New York • 


Chicago • Philadelphia 


Pittsburgh • 


Washington • Baltimore 


Los Ange 


es • San Francisco 



IS 



SPONSOR 




in Nev\^ England 



the ^ocai ;4^i^inacic^ 

Gets the Warmest Reception 



^^Istening to the local station is an old 
New England custom — as much a part of 
the community life as the annual town meet- 
ing or the high school graduation. 

Here's an important fact to remember 
about radio reception in New England: the 
Yankee Network's 23 home-town stations 
bring your message into 89.4% of the radio 



homes of New England — a sales impact 
with the kick of a mule. 

The Yankee Network is "sell-ective". You 
can buy the complete network of 23 sta- 
tions from Bangor to Bridgeport or you can 
buy any group of individual stations. 

The home town station is an essential 
with New England people and a must with 
the advertiser trying to reach them. 



/icce/itaticc U THE YANKEE NETWORK'S 'P<xu*uici(c<M, 

The Yankee Network, Inc. 

Member of fhe I^{j\\jo\ Broadcasting System 
21 BROOKLINE AVENUE, BOSTON 15, MASS. Represented Nationally by EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



JANUARY 1948 



13 



-Lxinln lk.1 Ik. .„ k.. . , 



10.000 WATTS 




i 



^/.eSwingisto^^lnK^n^^^G 




WHB is swinging high because . . . 

Throughout every period of its broadcast time, WHB 
is the area's highest Hooperated station. 

In the vast and incredibly rich Kansas City 
Marketland, WHB reaches effectively the greatest 
number of listeners per advertising dollar, has 
the lowest cost per thousand listener rate. 

WHB will soon be offering greater power, 
a better frequency and full-time operation! 

See your John Blair man today, and join 
the Swing to WHB in Kansas City! 

WHB 



MUTUAL NETWORK • COMING! • 10.000 WATTS DAY-5,1 
710 KILOCYCLES • FULL TIME 



WATTS NIGHT 




A NAME FOR SPOT 

I have just read, with a great deal of 
interest, your editorial "Spot Needs a 
Name." 

Paul Raymer's "selective advertising" 
doesn't, to me at least, quite hit the bell. 
It sounds a trifle too "exclusive." I take 
the liberty of offering my humble sug- 
gestion. 

Why not call it "market advertising"? 
Upon reflection, I think you'll agree that 
this term properly describes it. After all, 
so'called "spot advertising" is nothing 
more or less than advertising designed 
specifically to cover certain "markets" at 
the advertiser's and agency's discretion. 
It also would eliminate any confusion 
arising between announcements and pro- 
grams. C. Wylie Calder 
Manager, WHAN 
Charleston, S. C. 



Yes, indeed, "Spot Needs a Name"! 
Around here, "spot" means radio spx)t 
announcements. The other thing often 
referred to as "spot advertising" is always 
called either pin-point advertising or 
area advertising. We think either of 
these names might well be generally used. 
They are really descriptive, easy to say. 
H. R. Lauder.milk 
McCormick' Armstrong Co. 
Wichita, Kansas 



ONE BANK SOLUTION 

1 was \er> much interested in the 
article, Bankers' Mystery, appearing in the 
December issue of sponsor, and could not 
refrain from writing you of our experience 
at KSFO which, 1 believe, takes some of 
the mystery out of financial advertising. 

The Morris Plan Company of Cali- 
fornia, with offices in San Francisco and 
Oakland, has, for many years, been a big 
advertiser, using all media, including 
newspaper, outdoor, street car, and direct 
mail, with varying degrees of success. 
Radio had never been used nor considered 
on a consistent basis but had been used 
spasmodically and consisted chiefly of 
spot announcements. 

Last year, the Morris Plan people were 
keenly interested in increasing the number 
of their thrift savings accounts. Many 
campaigns and media were thoroughl)' 
discussed and finalh', in collaboration 
with their agenc> , Leon Livingston, radio 
was given the nod. With sound judg- 
ment, a program of the widest possible 
appeal was chosen, so with eyes on the re- 
markable record of other KSFO adver- 
{Please turn to page '^0) 



14 



S?DA'iO 



I 




I 









cv-t^ 



6\.^^^ 



JANUARY 1948 



^^??^???i^^?'?;?:!??^'^^ 



15 




16 



SPONSOR 







'^^ 



a/f^i 



To the best of our ability we shall operate in the public interest, convenience 
and necessity. 

All citizens shall receive equal consideration in regard to their constitutional 
rights whether of minority or majority groups. 

Recognized religious groups shall enjoy equal access to KVOO microphones 
and shall receive equal consideration and respect for the sanctity of their 
rituals and beliefs. 

The good things in life will be presented in the best light at all times while 
the mean, the sordid and the evil aspects of life will be minimized. 

Medical and professional information and/or advice will be broadcast only 
by authorized speakers and as a service of the station. 

The normal relationship of the sexes and family life will be referred to 
and/or portrayed in accordance with established customs of good taste and 
decency. 

Newscasts, political broadcasts, matters of public interest and controversial 
issues will be presented factually without dramatization. 

All commercial copy must comply with good business practices, professional 
ethics, KVOO Standards as herein outlined, and be acceptable listening in 
mixed company of the sexes. 

The amount of commercial copy allowable on any sponsored program or 
within any time period will be governed by the quality and method of pre- 
sentation and its fitness for the program within which it appears, except; 
Straight commercial copy which does not provide entertainment or educational 
value will be limited to the following time: 

5 minute programs (4:30) 1 :30 minutes commercial 

10 minute programs (9:30) 2:00 minutes commercial 

15 minute programs (14:30) 3:00 minutes commercial 

30 minute programs (29:30) 4:00 minutes commercial 

45 minute programs (44:30) 4:30 minutes commercial 

60 minute programs (59-.30) 6:00 minutes commercial 

We shall at all times be attentive to the desires and needs of our listeners, 
and try, to the best of our ability to perform our license and citizenship 
obligations in a manner worthy of the trust which is ours. 









OKLAHOMA'S GREATEST STATION 






EDWARD RETRY & CO. INC. 



JANUARY 1948 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



17 



Ltfial lll# Mi^m k.. 



*- 



p 



(See Mf Sponsor, Donald Bryant of Hudnu« Sales, SPONSOR, 

S October 1 947, paae 12.) Why did William R. Warner (Hudnut 
• parent company) drop its network programs? Are ttiey out oF 
radio for a long time? 



WMIX 

6eA4je4. ail • . • 

THE RICH 

DOWNSTATE 

ILLINOIS 

MARKET 

WMIX-AM 
WMIX-FM 



"Southern Illinois' Most Powtrful 
Radio Voic«" 

No. 2 Radio Center, Mt. Vernon, III. 

th« only stations that cover the 

entire rich Downstate Illinois 

Market with both AM and FM 

at one sinsle low rate. 



940 Ice 



94.1 mc 



National Representative 
John E. Pearson Company 



The thinking beliind Hudnut promotion is that new audiences must coH' 
stantly be reached. What builds a networi< radio program is the habit of 
listening, a faithful audience week after week. But Hudnut feels that 
what makes cosmetic sales is audience turnover, not audience consistency. 

Hudnut dropped its two network programs, Jean Sablon and Sammy 
Kaye, when it felt that it had reached the saturation point in new buying 
among listeners to this pair of sugary, ballad programs. The ideal 
format, as this cosmetic manufacturer sees it, would be a program that 
had a different audience every broadcast. The nearest approach to this is 
spot campaigns and that's what Hudnut has turned to in 40 to 50 markets. 
Everything from music to newscasts, including women's participating 
programs and luncheon shows, are being used. These spot campaigns are 
being backed with window displays, counter cards, and are tied into 
magazine color advertising. Radio plans for 1948 include regional broad' 
casting over the Don Lee system. 

The shift to spot and magazines will cost 30 per cent more for adver- 
tising than was spent in 1947, or nearly $5,000,000. 

Hudnut is not sour on network radio. The web programs curtailed 
the downward cosmetic sales curve. The report for the first nine months 
of 1947 indicates that Hudnut's sales increased 78 per cent. But when 
the shift to spot was pretested in Pittsburgh with Rayve shampoo the 
change of pace brought a 240 p>er cent increase in sales in the Smoky City . 

To Hudnut's that confirmed the fact that turnover's their answer. 



P 



(See "Crime Pays," SPONSOR, January 1947, page 24.) 

SWhy did Balm Barr and Carey Salt drop "The Shadow"? Why 
• did "The Shadow" become a network (MBS) cooperative 
program? How is it doing for Blue Coal? 



Balm Barr decided to discontinue its network advertising tThe Shadow 
|MBS)) because it just hasn't the budget to do both broadcasting and 
black-and-white. Its the opinion of Barr's advertising manager, Jerome 
H. Mitchell, that cosmetics require a visual campaign to complement radio 
promotion. He says that the stories of Lady Esther and Campana, both 
of which spent all their initial budget on the air, are different in that the 
competition wasn't the same when they were introduced as it is today. 
All Balm Barr's budget will go into rotogravure. The fact seems to be 
that the Barr organization is still trying to find the merchandising answer 
to it's problem and will continue testing media and copy slants for some 
time to come. The Shadow didn't fail to sell Balm Barr, Balm Barr just 
didn't know what they wanted it to do. 

Carey Salt, which also decided to withdraw from sponsorship of The 
Shadow, did so because it felt that while the program had a great number 
of listeners it wasn't adapted to their needs. The rumor that Carey 
felt that a general recession was in prospect is denied b> R. W. Streeter, 
advertising manager. He states, "We anticipate about the same general 
trend in volume for at least the next year, with the gradual increases con- 
tinuing." The idea of sponsoring a mystery scries never did sit well with 
conservative executives of the Carey organization. However, they 
recognize radio as a potent advertising medium and will continue to use 
it as part of Care>- advertising. Spot broadcasting will get almost as 
much mone\ as The Shadow did last season. 



18 



SPONSOR 




a natural tcs^t market 



Leading drug and grocery firms (names sent on request) in growing numbers 
^ are turning to the rich Ark-La-Tex to test their new products. Here in North 

Louisiana, East Texas and South Arkansas are nearly 2,000,000 people with 
more than $1,000,000,000 effective buying income. Shreveport is the distribution 
center for, and KWKH is the only station that influences all the industrial, agri- 
cultural and petroleum wealth of this great tri-state area. Big, 50,000-watt 
KWKH is the Number One station in a Number One market. 



■is SHIIVirORT 



rr 



SAtevefnytt 
JANUARY 1948 



sa,aaa WATTS 

RtpresenTed by The Branhain Co. J 



11 counties in Arkansas, 12 counties in Texas 
and 26 parishes in Louisiana (1946 BMB — 50°o- 
100%). served exclusively by Shreveport and 
KWKH. 



19 



■ I ■ lAalii Ihar Ik. . 




ASK YOUR 

WAAT MAN 

ABOUT 

WATV 



SERVING NEW 

JERSEY AND 

METROPOLITAN 

NEW YORK! 




After Carey and Barr had withdrawn from The Shadow sponsorship. 
Mutual made a determined effort and did take over control of the program 
coast to coast. MBS didn't see the sense of permitting an independent 
producer (Charles Michelson) to sell a program on the Mutual network 
despite the fact that he controlled radio rights except Blue Coal's under- 
writing. With no regional sponsors on the line, they sold the producer 
on permitting them to offer The Shadow as a c(X)perative program in all 
areas where its major sponsor, D. L. & W. Coal Company (Blue Coal), 
wasn't broadcasting. 

The MBS co-op department sold over 50 sponsors almost as soon as 
the announcement of its availability was made. Local sponsors include 
building contractors, plumbers, banks, soap companies, bakeries, tailors, 
and photographers. Current rating for the program is 10.8 (Hooper, 
December 7). 

Blue Coal is still getting everything out of the program it could hope 
for. Coal business, however, is no test for broadcast selling at present, of 
course, since the fuel shortage throughout the country continues. 



P 



S (See "Revere Explores the Unknown," SPONSOR, April 1947, 
p^se 23.) What has happened to "Explorins the Unknown"? 
What are Revere Copper and Brass' plans for radio advertising? 



Revere Copper and Brass dropped Exploring the Unknown after running 
it 13 weeks longer than originally planned. The frequency discount 
enabled them to use this period at a small fraction of what their regular 
operation had cost them. They did not shift to daytime radio (as re- 
ported in the story) because they are not ready productionwise to fill even 
the market developed by their institutional campaign on Exploring. 
Revere is scheduled to return to the air by September and the daytime 
program will be handled by St. Georges & Keyes and Sherman H. Dryer 
Productions. The new campaign will start on a regional basis. 

Since the Mutual Broadcasting System was unable to resell Exploring 
it was moved to the American Broadcasting Company where a sale was 
said to be imminent. The sale did not materialize and the program is 
continuing sustaining on Sundays at 7:30 p.m. The spot which Exploring 
had held down on MBS is now occupied by Parkyakarkiis, a cooperative 
program sponsored by local advertisers throughout the U. S. 



p.s 



(See "$500,000 program sells $8,000,000 in teen-age dresses," 
SPONSOR, March 1947, page 27.) Why did "Teentimers' 
• Club" leave the air? What's happened to NBC's only program 
with local retailer cut-ins? Does "Teentimers' Club" return to 
the air and when? 



In order for Teen-Timers, Inc., to retain its program on NBC it was 
necessary to resell stores in key broadcasting areas consistently. Jules 
Rubinstein failed to obtain renewals in certain areas so was not able to 
renew the program last fall. Retail merchandisers point out that any 
campaign which requires renewals from every one of the cooperating 
department stores is doomed to eventual blow-up. The fact that Teen' 
timers' Club ran as long as it did on the senior network is a tribute to 
Rubinstein's selling genius. 

Teentimers' Chib comes back to the air on Mutual, on February 14 at 
11:30, same day of the week it was on NBC but a half hour later. It 
will have a minimum of 150 stations on the program. MBS stations are 
trained to sell ccxjperative programs and are said to be doing part of the 
Rubinstein missionary work themselves. Rubinstein will do even more 
promotion on the Mutual program than he did on NBC. The show 
formula is said to be the same. 



80 



SPONSOR 



L . 



ow 




sno^tv 



NARRATED BY DAVID ROSS 




-^ 



AMERICA'S ^1 BAND ON AMERICA'S ^1 SHOW 



(THE ROYAL CANADIANS 

with Guy, Carmen, Lebert Lombardo. 

DAVID ROSS, NARRATOR 

Poet-Laureate of the air. 

THE TWIN PIANOS 

With Fred Kreitzer. Paul Rickenback. 

L03IBARD0 VOCAL TRIO 

Three voices blended in harmony. 

THE LOMBARDO ^lEDLEV 

jV sure-fire audience builder. 

LOMBARDO VOCALISTS 

)on Rodney and Kenny Gardner. 

THE FAMOUS LOMRARDO 
PICTURE STORY 

> tapestry in story and song. 



More than a band, here's a 
star-studded half-hour of mu- 
sical showmanship at its sensa- 
tional best. Now offered for 
local and regional sponsorship. 

TRANSCRIBED BY ZIV MEANS THE 
GREATEST IN RADIO SHOWS 



^ 



J 



mm n. 



m?m 



w? mnoH mo . aHciHHAj'.T'^ 

•""TO., <r«,c4o ' "**^" *' OHIO 



Remember the 
story about... 



the flake of snow 



that rolled 



That's the story of W-W-D-C! 
Starting in pretty shyly . . . then 
growing more confident as clients' 
business boomeci . . . we rolled 
right along! Today, to do a low 
cost sales job in the great Wash- 
ington market . . . you need the 
audience that, in vast numbers, 
listens to and is influenced by 
1450 on the dial! 



Only one other station in 

Washington has more 

loyal listeners 

WWDC 

AM-FM— The D. C. Independent 



Mr. Sponsur: J 




Sl<^|»li4'ii A. Il4»ii;j(las 



Director of Sales Promotion and Advertising, Kroger Co. 

' I *he Kroger grocery organization, whose 2,545 stores in 18 mid- 
west and southern states make it one of the country's largest, 
sells to just one customer. She is a Steve Douglas creation, the 
mythical young matron chiistened "Mrs. Tom Smith," and her 
wishes aie law in the Cincinnati headquarters of the chain. 
Kroger expects to gross $728,000,000 this year by selling hundreds 
of thousands of Mrs. Smiths just what they ask for at the grocery 
counters. 

It is Steve Douglas' job to make the Mrs. Smiths in the 
Kroger 18 states conscious of the fact that she will find all the 
national brands at Kroger's as well as sell her on the more profit- 
able house brands. Douglas last October reversed his field and 
spent a young fortune promoting national brands. Not only did 
he use national publications to tie up Kroger and all the nation's 
famous brands but he planned spot radio promotions in a number 
of his areas selling the "Kroger's for national brands" idea. 

While this special campaign was building new customers for 
Kroger's, two daytime serials were continuing to sell house 
brands of coffee and bread for the grocery chain. These two pro- 
grams*, Linda's First Love, the coffee show, and Edifor's Daughter, 
the bread-selling vehicle, are broadcast from e.t.'s over 41 stations 
in key midwest and southern markets. Both have been pushing 
the sales curve on coffee and bread as well as other Kroger- 
owned products higher and higher for more than 10 years. 

Both Linda and Editor's Daughter are richly promoted at the 
point of sale and this has resulted not only in top drawer sales 
results but in local Hoopcratings averaging between 10 and 11.5. 

Nobody in Steve Douglas' 75-person department issatisfied that 
they are doing the complete promotional and advertising job. 
Like Douglas himself they all say, "even if we are spending more 
than other grocery chains, it isn't enough. " 

*Thrse programs nrr rrprrsrnird in Ihf rrsf of the nnlinn (.70 slntrs'< fcv Hitrrv S. GitodntnTt. 



II 



22 



SPONSOR 




HERE'S THE 



M Look 

AT NORTHEASTERN OHIO 



Styles change with the years. And so 
does radio coverage of your markets. 
Here, in Northeastern Ohio, with new 
power . . . 50,000 watts . . . beamed to 
blanket three important marketing areas, 
Radio Station WGAR now reaches an 
audience of more than two and one- 
quarter million listeners, representing 40% 
of Ohio's buying income. 
Here, with more than three billion dollars 
to spend, is a market you want to reach 
with stepped-up, pepped-up selling . . . the 
kind of selling for which you'll pick WGAR 
as you take a new look at Northeastern Ohio. 



w&mmm^ 




CLEVELAND 



MOST POWERFUL 



SIGNAL OF ANY CLEVELAND STATION ;n Cleveland ... in Akron ... in Canton 
Representee/ Nafionally by EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY 



JANUARY 1948 



23 






:^i/ 




IS THE FIRST WITH 



The profitable operation of your FM station is the first interest of Westinghouse. 

Because a Westinghouse station was the world's first . . . because Westinghouse 
operates its own FM stations . . . because Westinghouse builds both FM trans- 
mitters and home receivers . . . because we believe in the future of FM and, more 
important, in its immediate possibilities . . . because of all these things, we want 
to help you build a listening audience for your new Westinghouse-equipped 
FM station. 

On these pages, you will find concrete evidence of this interest. Here is a new 
FM promotion plan — the first real one offered to the broadcast industry — designed 
specifically to build your listening audience. 

All of the resources of four Westinghouse divisions — Industrial Electronics, 
Home Receivers, Radio Stations, and Advertising and Sales Promotion — have 
been pooled to create this plan. It gives each of you who own a Westinghouse 
FM transmitter a sound, thoroughly tested plan that would cost you upward of 
$10,000 if you were to duplicate it yourself. 

Find out more about this program . . . it's the hottest thing in broadcasting 
since FM itself! Write, on your business letterhead please, to your near-by 
Westinghouse office or directly to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, P. O. 
Box 868, Pittsburgh 30, Pennsylvania. j.02117 



\ 




PLANTS IN 25 CITIES . . . 




ouse 

OFFICES EVERYWHERE 




from studio. ..to station. ..to home 




PROMOTION PLAN 



9 r.vT 



Consumer booklets 
Programming aids 




1^ 




TO PROMOTE YOUR 
NEW FM STATION 



a new promotion package to help you gain 
listener attention and build your audience 

Here's a promotion package of 47 ideas to build good will, identification 
and listener acceptance of your new FM station. 

It gives you ideas — and specific help — on every phase of station promo- 
tion. And this plan is also backed up by a strong, co-ordinated program 
developed for Westinghouse radio retailers that will help you promote 
FM in your community. 

Here's }A^hat this new FM plan offers: 

Newspaper advertisements Newspaper publicity Car and window cards 
Window displays Demonstrations and movies 

Radio spots Studio party guide 



Contests 
Dealer support 




There's a lot more to it than this . 



Wee 




The man behind the pen is signing a contract for Spot Radio — one 
the most profitable of all forms of advertising. But the signing of the 
contract means more than that — a lot more. It means that 
plenty of hard work has been done — somewhere, by some one. 

Yes — there's a lot more to it than fountain ^x^ns — or contract 
forms, or sales charts, coverage maps and station lists. 

There's training and experience, timing, associations, persistence 
maybe even a little luck. But primarily . . . it's a simple matter of 
knowledge and hard work . . . the two factors that produce 
most of the results most of the time . . . the two factors that make 

Weed & Company service so valuable to anv advertiser. | 

I 

I 
radio station representative 



a n 



d 



C O 111 p 



new y o r k 
cl 11 V s a n t r a n c i s c o 



boston * Chicago • derr 

a t 1 a n t a • h o 11 y w c h| 









Soft Drink 
Leadership 



hoiv" radio has 
changed the picture 
and the outl<»ok 
for 194a 



over-ai) 



Kf E H 



The average American con- 
sumes 155 bottles of soft 
drinks each year. His maximum con- 
sumption is between the ages of 19 and 24. 
In this age group Pepsi-Cola leads the 
field — and the leadership was achieved 
through a broadcast jingle. 

In other age groups the battle hasn't 
been joined yet. Here Coca-Cola far out- 
strips all contenders and is spending in 
radio currently four times as much as any 
other drink. 

In 1948 the Coca-Cola advertising bud- 
get will be $18,000,000, which is $5,000,- 
000 less than the advertising department 
had hoped for. Since a good part of this 
appropriation is in the uncheckable cate- 
gory most advertising reporting services 
will show figures of less than half this 
amount. Actually Coke will be spending 
as much for broadcasting alone as the 
entire reported budget of 1947. Coca- 
Cola has four programs on the air aside 
from what individual parent bottlers* will 
be spending themselves on broadcasts like 
sporting events in the Philadelphia area. 
These programs and their annual costs 

*Parenl bolllers are corporationt conlrolling bottling 
righU in great sections of the U. S. and franchising 
actual bottlert. 



27 



— J^tfcilfl 'hir Ihr nrnnTiiii lui i 






Whali Doing In PR.PEPPER AVmj\Sm 



<\ 



CONCENTRATED ATTACK 
WILL DRIVE YOUR PUNCHES HOME 

LOCAL & NATIONAL ADViRTlSINC THIS MONTH AIMED AT THE HOME MARKET 



TAKE 4 




Use Your ^*Take Home" Kit * To Insure 'Take Home" Success 

Broadcastin3 sets seven and a half cents out of each 25 that Dr. Pepper spends on advertisin3 
Spike Jones and his City Slickers are part of Coca-Cola's multi-million-dollar radio schedule 




(sans discounts) arc 

Coke on the Air 

Program Tali-nt & 'linu- 

PauNfThat Refreshes* $1,352,000 

Spike JoneH (Spollleht Time) $1,040,000 

Morton Downey $ 708.000 

Claudia & Davidf $1,250,000 
*h'raluriiiij I'ercy Faith. 

t Theorelically placed by local botllm at local rales but 
artually paid for by Coca Cola. 

Thus $4,350,000 will be spent on radio 
if the programs or their equivalents con- 
tinue throughout the entire year. 

The only rub in this tremendous use of 
the broadcast medium is that the youth 
market, which is any cola drink's vital 
consuming group, is not being reached by 
any of these four programs. Coke's mar- 
kets, as the great Atlanta firm itself 
characterizes them are, At Home, At 
Work, Youth, Special Events, and Route 
although they do not list them in this 
order of importance. 

The home market is reached by the 
daily Claudia and David and the Percy 
Faith program on Sunday. Spike Jones 
may be addressed to the "at work" mar- 
ket but by what kind of thinking at the 
D'Arcy agency or at the Coke advertising 
department no one knows. Whom Mor- 
ton Downey is supposed to reach (he's on 
the air at 11:15 p.m. e.s.t. three times a 
week) is another question mark. 

The "special events" market is not 
reached by any air advertising of the 
Coke parent company, but as indicated 
previously a number of the big bottlers 
slant air advertising at this business 
through their own broadcasts of sporting 
events. 

Coca-Cola's failure to recognize the im- 
portance of the teen-age group, whose 
habits, according to a Ps>chological Cor- 
poration surve> , determine the drinking 
habits of the 19-24 group, is felt by many 
to be the Achilles heel in their promo- 
tional thinking. 

The impact, however, of reaching the 
radio audience twice a week between 6 and 
10 p.m., the late evening audience three 
times weekly (Downey), and the daytime 
listeners five times weekl)- (Claudia) is 
bound to be tremendous. Previous pro- 
graming b\' Coke has never had much of 
an audience. The Spotlight Bands (at 
times MBS and at others ABC) usually 
had a Hooperating of 2. Morton Downey 
(^MBS) in the daytime also was rated at 2 
or less. The Sunday afternoon Andre 
Kostelanctz-Lil\' Pons program on CBS 
did better than 2 (it hovered around 5 
most of the time it was on the air.) No 
Coke program, starting with its air debut 
featuring Jessica Dragonctte as the Coca- 
Cola girl in 1927, ever attracted a mass 
audience. Coca-Cola's current rating 
story is better than it has ever been 
before, with Nielsens in the IDs and 

SPONSOR 



Hooperatings in the 7s. 

Coca-Cola falls down on promoting its 
broadcast advertising — and since point- 
of-sale tie-in material is an essential part 
of using the air to sell, the leading soft 
drink firm in the world obtains only part 
value for its radio dollar. The firm is so 
big that point-of-sale material is planned 
a year ahead of its distribution. That 
makes it very difficult to promote radio 
effectively. As one promotion man in 
Coke's advertising department stated, 



increase in price to seven cents in most 
markets while Coca-Cola has turned 
handsprings trying to keep its dealers to 
the five cent figure. The Pepsi jingle, 
written by Austen Croom-Johnson and 
Alan Kent, made the nation conscious of 
a 12-ounce cola drink at a nickel. The 
jingle became so popular that it was even 
played without words on stations which 
refuse singing jingles— they played the 
tune and the listeners themselves sup- 
plied the words. 



gram and its anti-juvenile delinquency 
pitch. 

Pepsi-Cola will spend about $2,000,000 
on advertising in 1948. Its big problem 
is maintaining a bottling organization 
that's satisfied with its margin of profit — 
which it hasn't been able to do for some 
time. A rebate of two cents per case re- 
portedly is being paid them currently to 
keep peace in the family. This doesn't 
help too much in areas where cutthroat 
battles are going on between oth.-r 1 2- 




Harry Resor and his Clicquot Eskimos did one of broadcasting's greatest selling jobs. His musical signature meant ginger ale ts millions 



"We can't know if the programs will be on 
the air a year from now, so we've never 
discussed merchandising our programs 
beyond using newspaper advertising to 
introduce the new vehicles to the radio 
audience." 

The reverential manner in which the 
entire Coca-Cola organization approaches 
the advertising of the product leaves the 
entire field open to an aggressive com- 
petitor. Neither on the air nor in print 
may any claims be made for the product 
beyond the fact that it offers "the pause 
that refreshes." 

The youth market has been captured by 
Pepsi-Cola in many big cities, including 
New York. In fact, at the end of 1946 
Pepsi was the number one cola drink in 
metropolitan New York. It has lost some 
headway all over the country due to the 

JANUARY 1948 



Pepsi was hard hit by the war and 
sugar restrictions. It also just hasn't 
made the grade with any form of broad- 
casting except the jingle. That's now 
been changed so that there's no more 
nickel in it. The last program Pepsi-Cola 
tried — on Mutual for 13 weeks starting 
February 24, 1946— was a liberal program 
with Quentin Reynolds called Let's Talk 
It Over and was such a quickie that it 
went on the air before a name had been 
selected for it. Overtly it was an attempt 
to reach the youth market. Reports 
within the industry indicated that a basic 
motivation probably was a desire to 
make a political impression which would 
net them more sugar for their product. 
One thing is certain, Mrs. Walter Mack 
(Ruth Meier), wife of Pepsi's president, 
worked feverishly publicizing the pro- 



ounce bottled cola drinks and Pepsi. In 
Chicago Royal Crown Cola (Nehi Cor- 
poration) upset the market by dropping 
the price back to a nickel and making the 
news known by extensive advertising, on 
the air and via black-and-white. In 
Akron, the Pepsi bottler is said to be 
giving away one case free to a dealer for 
each case he buys in order to fight Royal 
Crown. Chicago and Akron are just 
straws which indicate that the cola busi- 
ness is heading for a slugfest before 
another year is over. 

Royal CrouTi, which rates third am )ng 
cola drinks, like Pepsi, places its con- 
fidence in spot announcement broadcast- 
ing (on some 250 stations). The an- 
nouncements designed and placed by 
Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn stress 
{Please turn to page 90) 



29 



— ^^jfclln till Ihr wi.^..n 1... . . 







•J i \fTTTT~i'i ii^H 


















Beiirus Sale 



Tli<^r4^*>» magic il 



Jinslcs recorded by star sin3in3 groups are 
used by Benrus dealers all the year round 



Benrus' radio-identiFication with airlines and terminals is accented by its tie-ups with airports as well as leadins flying organizations 



I u.-.Maitiimj 




^ • 



yvi 



4 



HICK I Municipal III! 



la Station Breaks 



pi*oiti€»tioiial tolloiv-tliroiijyfh 




spot 



Benrus is a radio-made watch. 
The Lazrus-headed tick-tock- 
ery (there are Benjamin, Oscar 
M., and Ralph Lazrus) wasn't a factor in 
the watch business prior to its sponsorship 
of time-signals; today it spends 80 per 
cent of its ad-dollars for broadcasting. 
And a sizable share of its $1,150,000 
budget goes tt) promote its air'advertising 
at the point of sale. 

Each air-dollar must be spent the hard 
way, because Bulova continues to have 
powerful key stations sewed up tighter 
than Stalin has Russia. Every good sta- 
tion Benrus signs is obtained the hard 
way, but KDKA, Pittsburgh, WGY, 
Schenectady, and WCAU, Philadelphia 
were won away from competition. Benrus 
frequently buys time on the sfecond or the 
third station in a town, feeling that a spot 
before Crosby or Winchell is much better 
than second-rate spots on the number one 
outlet. Benrus recently shifted from 
WMC, the NBC outlet in Memphis, to 
WMPS, the ABC station in that city. 
WMC had increased its rates and Benrus 
could get 10 spots on WMPS for less than 
it was paying for five on WMC. The 
shift, besides saving ad-dollars, reflected 
thinking at Benrus. They have records 
that indicate that repetition is more effec- 
tive than big audiences. If there's a 
choice between reaching a mass audience 
a limited number of times and a smaller 
group more frequently their tendency is 
to buy the station with the lesser circula- 
tion. 

It pays off. 

Despite the fact that no black-and- 
white advertising is used, Benrus does not 

JANUARY 1948 



expect the air actually to sell their 
watches. They are convinced that the 
actual sales are consummated by the 
jewelers, not the advertising. On the 
other hand when a consumer goes into a 
store and asks for a Benrus, or any other 
watch, it conditions the retailer just as 
much as, if not more than, it influences 
the final watch sale. 

Benrus wasn't original in its use of air 
time. Bulova was doing a terrific job 
with broadcast advertising and the Lazrus 
company felt they could do likewise. 
They bought a good many time signals on 
a good many stations and found, just as 
Arde Bulova and Milton Blow (the 
Bulova agency) had discovered before 
them, that time signals sold timepieces. 

They hadn't the Bulova budget to 
spend but they were perfectly happy to 
sell less than the big Bulova operation. 
At the outset just their being on the air 
brought people to jewelers to bu\' 
watches. That didn't continue long and 
the trend then ran to the firm with the 
most air advertising — Bulova. Benrus 
then decided to roll up its sleeves and 
bring in an air promotion specialist, 
Adrian Planter, to spark-plug their adver- 
tising. Even before that Benrus had 
started to tie in with air transportation. 
Since the public was being educated to the 
fact that airlines flew on split-second 
schedules and since Benrus had dis- 
covered that buyers of watches valued, 
above all other things, accuracy, the catch 
line, "official watch of famous airlines," 
plus rotated mentions of the airlines which 
Benrus has tied up — Delta, Northwest, 
(Please turn to page 79) 



31 




(top) Point-of-sale clocks emphasize airline time 
(center) Benrus officials see "Miss Embraceable" to plane 
(above) News tape pulls eyes to Benrus airport time 
(below) Benrus air give-aways are promoted by dealers 




M market 



JANIJAKY 



l» 



National coverage by FM stations is still far away but the 288 sta- 
tions on the air cover over 60 per cent of the nation's most profitable 
markets. True, most of these stations are operating with interim 
power but 80 per cent of them are moving along towards fulfilling their 
license requirements within the next six months. Many expect to be 
operating with full power before March 1 . According to the Federal 
Communications Commission, on December 3 there were actually 331 
FM stations on the air, but this figure includes some educational 
broadcasting stations which, while helping to develop FM listenership, 
are not available for advertising. 

Partial power and part-time operation (many stations are not on the 
air the full 18 hours that most standard broadcasters operate) may 
seem to shadow the outlook for frequency modulation. They don't. 
Progress is being made. Ingenuity is replacing network programs in 
building FM listening just as sports have made a major contribution 
to TV growth, so also are they building FM listening in many areas 
that have no television — and which because of location may be without 
visual entertainment on the air for many years to come. In a number 
of cases FM station operators have gone out and signed on an exclusive 
basis events that have for years been standard broadcasting features. 
Station WIZZ in Wilkes-Barre for instance signed 161 professional 
basketball and baseball games this season. This station is trying to 
prove that it's a whiz in promotion and claims that it is absorbing 3 to 
4 per cent of the national production of FM-AM receivers and a healthy 
quantity of tuners (devices which enable AM set owners to receive 
FM programs). Besides reaching home listeners (WIZZ claims 40,000 
FM-AM receivers in its service area), the station has started what 
it calls "Transcasts," which will ultimately 
place FM sets in all the trolleys and buses 
in its area. This "Transcast" installation 
differs from previous demonstrations in 
trolleys (Cincinnati) in that speakers are 
placed throughout each vehicle so that 
WIZZ's programs are heard throughout 
the vehicle with about equal intensity. 




® Towii5« with I FM outlet 
@ Towns with 2 F>l outlet 
(^ Towns with :t FM outlet 

Numbers indicate number of FM outlets in town. 



Like WIZZ, WWDC-FM in Washing- 
ton, D. C, is out promoting FM in every 
way possible. It goes to its full power in 
the latter part of January and expects as 
part of its promotion prior to that time to 
have a special section in one of the local 
Tiewspapers that will run to 20 pages or 



32 



larger. WWDC, the FMer's parent sta- 
tion, is typical of the operators who are 
going all out for the staticless type of 
broadcasting. It's a 250-watt operation 
which is doing a top program job but 
knows it isn't covering every part of the 
Capital market. With FM, it's putting a 
signal (even under interim power) in 
places in which WWDC itself isn't even a 
noise. Stations like this have a great deal 
to gain by complete consumer acceptance 
of FM and really roll up their sleeves to 
tell the public why FM is better. 

The set-production bottleneck is loosen- 
ing up each month as set manufacturers 



lick the problem of producing combina- 
tion FM-AM sets at reasonable prices. 
The tuners (of which Pilotuner is a 
leader) are educating future buyers of 
combination sets, for while these tuners 
cannot deliver program quality any better 
than the reproducing facilities of the AM 
receiver to which they are attached, they 
do eliminate the static. In many areas 
this is just as important as the full-range 
quality of the sound that comes forth 
from the speakers. 

In 1946 over 1,000,000 combination 
FM-AM receivers were produced i Radio 
Manufacturers' Association figures). 

SPONSOR 




Two hundred and eighty-eight frequency modulation stations reach a market representing 60 9^ of profitable areas throughout United States 



These do not include tuners, which are 
said to have run as high as 150,000 during 
the year. Most of these sets and tuners 
have passed into homes, because over 65 
per cent of all the FM stations on the air 
go out of their way to sell receivers. 
Twenty'seven per cent of the stations 
now operating are acting as sales agents, 
although half of this 27 per cent clear the 
sales through local dealers in order to re- 
tain the good-will of these local mer- 
chants. Every time a new station makes 
its bow, Pilotuner is in there pitching not 
only with special advertising copy but 
making a tie-up with the station and the 



dealers. The tuner is not a long profit 
item, the dealer's margin being around 
$7.50, but since some dealers have sold as 
high as 40 in one day when a new station 
opened a market, the short profit can add 
up to a long one. 

Typical of the number of sets which 
will be in cross-section areas throughout 
the nation on February 1 are the reports 
for the following areas (stations operating 
in each area indicated) : 

Town Station Sets* 

.\bilene, Tex. KRBC 5.710 

Beckley. W. Va. WLJS-FM 13.000 

Bethlehem, Pa. VVGP.\ 7,500 

Columbus. O. WELD 13,000 



Fort Dodge, la. KFMY 10,000 

Grand Rapids VVLAV-FM 25,000 

WFRS 
Ithaca, N. Y. WHCU 17,000 

Joplin, Mo. WMBH-FM 4.500 

New York \V.\BF 200,000 

WBAM 

WCBS-FM 

WFUV 

WGHF 

WGYN 

WMGM 

WNBC-FM 

WNYC-FM 

WQXO 
Oklahoma City KOCY-FM 6,600 

KOMA-FM 

KTOK-FM 

WKY-FM 

{Please turn to page 72) 



JANUARY 1948 



33 




Live stock must move to this Wilson Co. plant 





Sy^^^fei-^ * 




Market reports direct from yards sell farmer 




Listening before luncfi is a farmer's habit 



Selling The Supplier 



Flow of iiiali^riaK to llio iiiaiiiifa<*furer. pro- 
cessor, or ri'iailer €*airt be taken for {[^ranted 




Buyers and sellers don't like 
f»I»ll each other. This has been 
proved true at the consumer 
level. It's even truer at the wholesale 
and distributing level. A survey made by 
Grey Advertising of the relations between 
department stores and their sources of 
supply indicates that, by and large, sup- 
pliers dislike department stores and their 
buyers. Further investigation proved 
that relations between buyer and seller 
have been deteriorating for years and 
reached an all-time low during the war. 

In a few cases department store man- 
agements, realizing the problem, have 
made a special effort to correct the 
mental conflict between their executives 
and sales staffs of organizations serving 
them. This effort has taken the form of 
personalized direct mail which keeps the 
manufacturers constantly aware of what 
the stores are doing to promote the manu- 
facturers' products. In these letters are 
included copies of black-and-white adver- 
tising, pictures of window displays, and 
copies of commercial continuity used on 
the air for the products. Sometimes re- 
cordings are sent to the manufacturer 
(transcribed at a speed that can be played 
on any phonograph) . A number of stores 
have found that shipments are especially 
good from suppliers who have received re- 
cordings of broadcast advertising used to 
sell their lines. 

Alexanders' in New York used a TV 
series over WABD and prior to each tele- 
cast invited a group of their supply 
sources to a dinner. The president of the 
store at each dinner explained that he 
thought that a retailer forward enough in 
its thinking to sponsor a visual program 
on the air deserved special consideration 
from the manufacturers whose products 
the store handled. The entire telecast 



34 



campaign was geared to giving Alexan- 
ders' the reputation of being a modem 
up-to-the-minute merchandiser. It did 
just that and the relations between 
Alexanders' and its sources of supply are 
said to be on the highest level in the retail 
field. 

While the Allied Stores' TV tour of 22 
of its stores was basically a merchandising 
gimmick, it resulted in increased respect 
on the part of suppliers for all Allied 
outlets. This was expected, as far as 
those suppliers that participated in the 
traveling show were concerned, but it sur- 
prised Allied to discover that the tour had 
a beneficial effect on the relations between 
Allied stores and all their sources. 

Supplier relations have taken their 
place alongside consumer and employee 
relations as a major advertising job. 
Broadcasting's contribution to improved 
management and labor relations has been 
covered in a previous report (sponsor, 
August). The supplier problem goes far 
beyond building retailer-wholesaler mu- 
tual respect. Big corporations which buy 
from fanners have also found that they 
have a supplier problem of enormous pro- 
portions. Milk companies (sponsor, 
November) are very aware of the job on 
their hands and have booths at State and 
County fairs in all dairy areas. They 
broadcast from these booths over local 
stations and their programs are addressed 
to the dairymen from whom they buy 
raw milk. 

What is true of milk farmers is even 
truer of the men who raise beef cows. 
The farmers who breed and raise live 
stock for meat packers have long looked 
u pon the big butchers of cattle, sheep, and 
pigs with less than friendship. Armour, 
Swift, Cudahy, and Wilson purchase over 
[Please tur>\ to page 74) 

SPONSOR 



. . you CAN 
REDUCE YOUR 
SALES COSTS 

Ui Ute, DETROIT Anea 




6jee Ucuu ifUicJt |\/|^ ^Ixl ^^*^ 9^ ^^^ 



CKLW 



LvOCATED on, and bounded by Lake Erie, Lake Huron and the Detroit River, 
CKLW beams its 5,000 watt clear channel signal via the water route to a ten-million population area 
with a radio-homes and buying-power percentage second to none in America. The power of 5,000 
watts day and night. A middle-o(-the-dial frequency of 800 kc. That, coupled with the lowest 
rate of any major station in this market, has made and continues to prove CKLW the Detroit Area's 
Number One radio buy. 

Guardian Bldg., Detroit 26 Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc., Sat' I Rep. 

J. E. Campeau, President H. N. Stoi'in eS Co., Canadian Rep. 



5,000 Watts Day and Night— 800 kc— Mutual Broadcasting System 



JANUARY 1948 35 




NBC 



netivon 





most popular . . . according to Hooper Program 
Surveys. Year after year NBC has carried 
an overwhelming majority of the most pop- 
ular [)rograms on the air. Today, 19 of the 
25 highest rated programs are on NBC. 

fNost listened to . . . according to the Broadcast 
Measurement Bureau, the industry's officia' 
audience gauge. BMB. in a completelv ini 
partial survey of actual listeners to all net 
works, found that each week NBC reache^ 
nearly 3,500,000 more radio families ir 
the evening and over 2,500,000 more radi( 
families in the daytime than the seconc 
network. 

jiiost effective ... in the judgment of adver 
tisers. Last vear. according to Publisher? 
Information Bureau, gross expenditures fo 
network iaeilities hv the hundred larges 
radio advertisers, were S65.000.000 o 
MC— nearly 313,000,000 more than o 
the second network. Further. NBC not onl 
delivers larger audiences and more popuU 
shows, but on a straight comparison ( 
facility costs and BMB families, NBC d 
livers more listeners per dollar, both di- 
and night, than the network with the se 
ond largest audience. 



\fthe stars 



These are the stars 

of the 19 NBC programs which 

today ore among radio's 

top 25. (HOOPER REPORT NOV. 15-21) 
KEY 

1. Boh Hope 

2. Jack Benny 

3. Fibber McGee and Molly 

4. Charlie McCarthy 

5. Amos Vi' Andy 

6. Fred Allen 

7. Red Skelton 

8. Mr. District Attorney 

9. Ralph Edivards 

0. Al Jolson 

1. Alice Fare & Phil Harris 

2- Duffy s Tavern {Ed Gardner) 

3. Burns & Allen 

14. The Great Gildersleeve 

5. William Bendix 

6. Frank Sinatra 

7. Henry Aldrich 

8. Judy Canova 

p. Jack Carson & Eve Arden 

1 

AWINGS BY SAM BERMAN 






:% 






12 




A?^' 1:..:^ 





y 






-^ 



10 




America's No. 1 Network 



the National Broadcasting Company 




A service of Radio Corporation of America 



.il-attUn It.! il,. .^ h.. . „ — , 



A 



spot 
trends 



Based upon the number of spots (prosrams and 
announcements) placed each month by all 
sponsors indexed by Rorabaugh Report on 
Spot Radio Advertising. Spots reported 
September 1947 are used as base, or 100. 



Spot placement in November was fractionally off — .23 points nationally. 
Food was up 5.9, soaps, cleansers, and toiletries up 2.96 All other industry 
classifications were off: beverages and confectionery, .60 points; tobacco, 
9.72; drugs, 5. 1 ; miscellaneous, 4.53. Automotive placement took the great- 
est drop, its index being off 35.5 points. Some sponsors who increased their 
station lists during the month were Birds-Eye (from 99 to 104 j, Junket 
(from 1 to 35), Swift's Ice Cream (49 to 84). Minute Rice and Minute Tapi- 
oca came back to the medium, the former with a 53-station schedule and the 
latter with 17. November is traditionally a preholiday month and spot 
placement is seasonally off. The drop affected practically all areas, only 
New England doing better than October and then only fractionally (.48). 
An upswing will not _be noticeable until this month's reports are made. 



1947-48 


AUG 1 SEP 1 OCT NOV 1 DEC 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 


JUL 




250 — 


Based 


upon repo 


rt5 from 27 


4* Sponjoi 


s 
















200 




























150 

100 
























































NATIONAL TREND 












50 


79.28 


100.00 


102.69 


102.46 














1 1 1 1 



Trends by Geographical Areas 



Trends by Industry Classifications 



250- 


9S3 

2,5 


pa 

I80,C 


m 

)00r 


adio 


familiec 


^Q 


^ff 


^Q 


RQl 


^Q 


^^1 


200 — 


























150 — 

100 — 


























50- 




^^^H 














New England 1 


10.2] 


100.09 


»7.«2 


11.11 


250 — 


Tl 


66,C 


00 r 


adio 


families 














200 — 


























150 — 

100- 

50- 






L. 


























SAiddle Atlantic 


71.20 


100.00 


I0S.4I 


10] 40 


250 — 


11, 


387,( 


)00 radio 


families 














200- 


























150 — 


























100- 
50- 


























101. ?7 






108 00 




Mid-Western 














250— 


6,: 


J99,C 


•00 radio 


fami 


les 














200— 


























150— 
100— 


























50— 


100.11 100.00 


92 40 


MSO 










Southern 


250" 


4, 


766, 


)00 


adio 


fam 


lies 














200- 


























150- 
100- 






■ 
























50 — 


I2.(i 100.01 


101.12 


100 ;t 










Rocky Mountairt 



ittiSlib 



250 — 
200 — 
150 — 
100 — 
50 — 



200— I I I 

in 

50- jHMBmi 



sspsiBsaEaiQais 

95 Sponsors Reporting 




250— 23^pon$ors Reporting 
200— 
150— 
100— 
50— 



250— 50 SponsorsReporting 



200; 

150: 

100- 

50- 



250; 
200; 
150; 
100- 
50^ 



2502 
200- 
150^ 

loo- 
se- 



lOilM 100.04 10] SO 



SJ} 



17 Sponsors Reporting 



nil 




BfTl 



6 Sponsors Reporting 



— 12 Sponsors Reporting 




ponsors Reporting 



aSBZIBIDIEDEq 



'For thi 
many di 
sponsor 

38 



s total a sponsor is regarded as a single corporate entity no matter how 
verse divisions it may include. In the industry reports, however, the same 
may be reported under a number of classihcationt. 




Beverages and 
Confectionery 



Soaps, Cleansers 
and Toiletries 







Automotive 



Tobacco 



Miscellaneous 



1111 



SPONSOR 




Paul W. Moreney, Vice-Pres.— Gen. Mgr. Walter Johnson, Assistant Gen. Mgr.— Sis. Mgr. 

WTIC's 50,000 waHs represented nationally by Weed & Co. 



JANUARY 1948 



39 



m£RAGLL 





NEBRASKA 



\ KMBC 

^Y KANSAS CITY 



MISSOURI 




Red area shows solid respoost 
from counties within KFRM'j 
estimated half-millivolt contours 



Dark area shows response froo 
listeners outside KFRM's esd 
mated half-millivolt contours 



KMBC 

of Kansas City 

KFRM 

for Kansas Farm Coverage 



Nationally Represented 
by Free 8c Peters, Inc. 



KFRM, KM EC's 5,000-watt day- 
time affiliate station for rural 
Kansas at 550 Kc, was born De- 
cember 7— full grown, complete 
with audience. In just 7 days, lis- 
teners in 208 counties in 7 states 
had been heard from. That's quick 
proof of a big audience. Quick 
proof of listener acceptance for 



KFRM's programming by KMBC 
of Kansas City. A study of th< 
accompanying map, which super 
imposes KFRM's estimated half 
millivolt contours on its firs 
week's mail map, shows how th 
youngest member of the KMBC 
KFRM team has hit the jackpc 
for listeners and advertisers alik( 




OIL and the Opera 



What appears^ to 

be only a piiblii* 
service is one of 
radios most effective 
selling veiiieles 






Very few of Texaco's 45,000 
dealers ever have listened to 
the Metropolitan Opera, but 
a great majority of this gigantic distribu' 
tion organization would gladly pay an 
extra penny per gallon rather than have 
the Texas Company drop air sponsorship 
of what is today the world's greatest 
"good" music organization. 

The wedding of the Texas Company 
and America's great musical dramatic 
company is a perfect blending of business 
and art. Both the opera and the oil com- 
pany have profited hugely from their 
joint air enterprise. Sale of millions of 
gallons of Texas gasoline and oil is directly 
traceable to their Saturday afternoon 
broadcasts. The opera, formerly the 
plaything of the 400 and the delight of the 



JANUARY 1948 



nation's barbers, is now an American 
institution. The musty resplendency of 
Park Avenue "art patrons" is now just an 
opening-night phenomenon at the opera. 
Even the stars, who for years have been of 
foreign origin and/or appellation (the 
latter to achieve acceptance as foreign), 
are at present almost half of American 
birth and nomenclature. The recent pro- 
duction of Madama Butterfly (December 
13) had James Melton of Moultrie, 
Georgia, singing the male lead, Benjamin 
Pinkerton. Other U. S. talent included 
Irene Jordan of Birmingham, Alabama, as 
Kate Pinkerton; John Baker of Passaic, 
New Jersey, as the Imperial Commis- 
sioner, and Thelma Altman of Buffalo, 
New York, as Suzuki, servant to Cio-Cio- 
San. The balance of the cast came from 



41 



all over the globe. CiO'Cio-San, Madama 
Butterfly, was Licia Albanese; Goro, the 
marriage broker, was Alessio de Paolis; 
and the Uncle Priest was Melchiorre 
Luise all three of Italy. Sharpless, the 
U. S. Consul was John Brownlee of Mel- 
bourne, Australia. Yamadori, a wealth) 
suitor, was George Cehanovsky of Russia. 

Last season (1946 1947) saw all per- 
formances 97 per cent sold out. The sub- 
scription audience accounted for 85 of all 
the seats. Total receipts were $2,829,688, 
and there was a net profit for the season of 
$1 1,808 which meant that there was no 
postseason passing of the hat among the 
members of the Metropolitan Opera Asso- 
ciation who in the past have been called 
upon to make up deficits as high as a half 
million. 

There is little doubt but that it is the 
year-after-year broadcasting of the Satur- 
day afternoon performances that has 
changed both the color of the ink on the 



opera ledgers and America's appreciation 
of opera. Its live and radio audience has 
increased year by year. The Metropoli- 
tan Opera has been on the air regularly 
now for 16 years, the last eight of which 
have been underwritten by the Texas 
Company. Because of the understanding 
nursing of Henry Souvaine, who has pro- 
duced the air-package since it first was 
sponsored (1933-1934) by the American 
Tobacco Company, the Metropolitan 
Opera broadcasts are not stand-offish pre- 
sentations of classical music. Instead 
they're three-ring musical programs. 

The opera itself is the main ring but 
there's the first intermission. Opera News 
of the Air, a sort of air musical magazine 
edited by Boris Goldovsky, New England 
musical authority. He usually has two 
guest stars. On the occasion of the 
Madama Butterfly airing he had Irra 
Petina and Jerome Hines. The second 
intermission feature is generally the Opera 



Texaco gas stations proudly display this poster feeling it gives them "class" appeal 




Quiz. Olin Downes, New York Times 
musical critic, asks questions sent in by 
the listeners of a musical board of authori- 
ties, of which Sigmund Spaeth, Robert 
Bagar, and Robert Lawrence, all writers 
on things musical, are usually a part. The 
third extra added attraction is the Opera 
Round Table, an informal session at which 
the Opera Quiz authorities, producer 
Henry Souvaine, and guests kick around 
things operatic. It's all easy, ad lib, and 
unrehearsed. Over 1,000 questions per 
broadcast (20,000 for the 18-week season) 
are sent in for the Opera Quiz alone, which 
is indicative of the appeal of the inter- 
mission features. 

In theory, Texas Company's sponsor- 
ship of the Metropolitan Opera is not 
straight commercial advertising. In fact, 
it's as commercial as anything on the air 
and delivers sales at a lower cost than 
many of the popular top-bracketed star 
programs that have been sponsored by 
Texaco. While the results may not be as 
great as those achieved by Ed Wynn, the 
Texaco Fire Chief program at its height, 
they equal per dollar of cost any other 
program that Texas has sponsored, in- 
cluding Fred Allen. The Metropolitan 
Opera costs Texas $407,357 for its 18- 
week season — $180,000 for talent and 
$227,357 for time. During each season it 
reaches some 10,000,000 listeners— that 
is, during the 18 weeks at least this num- 
ber listen and hear part of one of the 
three-hour airings. Its actual rating has 
gone up steadily, the average Hooperating 
last season being 4.2 whereas in 1944-1945 
it was 3.0. This rating (as all Hooperat- 
ings) is for an "average minute" during 
the broadcast and does not take into con- 
sideration audience turnover, which dur- 
ing any three-hour broadcast is consider- 
able. 

The effect of Texaco's sponsorship of 
this 18-week season is felt all year 'round. 
One truck fleet owner whose gasoline pur- 
chases run into millions of gallons per year 
admitted he had shifted to Texaco be- 
cause his wife said that any company who 
sponsored such a fine program must pro- 
duce a good gasoline— and after all he 
"wanted to keep peace in the family." 

It's a general consumer feeling that any 
firm that sponsors such a broadcast as the 
Metropolitan Opera must have its heart 
in the right place. The urge to buy 
Texaco gasoline. Marfax lubrication, or ^1 
any of the other 698 Texas Company 
products doesn't result from commercial 
reasons-why on the air so much as just 
because the oil company sponsors the 
broadcasts. While other sponsors of good 
musical programs have dropped their 

SPONSOR 




Milton Cross acts as interlocutor on an "Opera Quiz" session Typical "Opera News oF the Air" with producer Souvaine (left) supervising 



k 



underwriting of these events — with the 
exception of Reichhold 's sponsorship of the 
Detroit Symphony over ABC — the Texas 
board of directors, not the advertising 
manager (D. W. Stewart) or the president 
(H. T. Klein), votes the renewal of each 
year's contract. They also bought the 
program in 1940 when it was first pro- 
posed to them. 

Typical unsolicited comments from 
listeners show how the Metropolitan 
Opera broadcasts sell Texaco. From a 
Los Angeles listener: ". . . we Americans 
are mighty lucky to have the Metropoli- 



Millions saw this ad 



:lass 



magazines 




^^^S^^^^^[ 



tan Opera coming to us through radio. 
How can we help but use the best gasoline 
one can put into one's most cherished 
treasure — an automobile." 

From Atlanta, Georgia: "This program 
is a distinct service to the American public 
... 1 appreciate the Texas Company's 
generosity in this gesture of true public 
service. It may be of interest to you that 
the three members of my immediate 
family intend to remain faithful to Texaco 
Sky Chief gasoline for the family auto- 
mobiles." 

From Long Island City: "... Please 
accept a rousing vote of thanks and ap- 
plause for your interest in stimulating an 
appreciation for the finer things. Thank 
you for the enjoyment of the program and 
thank you for Texaco products." 

These letters are not unusual, they were 
picked out of a week's mail at random and 
indicate that listeners are buyers of Texas 
Company products. 

The fact is that a survey of a selected 
cross-section of Metropolitan Opera lis- 
teners by an independent survey organi- 
zation indicates that as a group they buy 
20 per cent more gasoline than the average 
American family— and almost without 
exception buy Texaco. 

Texas spends around $3,000,000 a year 
for advertising. The Tony Martin 
Texaco Star Theater costs $855,000 for 
time on ABC and $728,000 for talent, 
which means that about half of Texas' 
advertising budget goes for this program. 
A little more than a quarter as much, 
$407,357, is spent for the Metropolitan 
Opera. Thus about two-thirds of the 
Texas Company budget goes into radio. 

While Texas doesn't go overboard in 
promoting the Opera or their "popular" 



JANUARY 1948 



broadcast program they do spend a con- 
siderable sum on point-of-sale posters. 
This season they ran full pages in color on 
the Opera in Time, Life, Saturday Evening 
Post, Newsweek, and Colliers. They also 
supplied one-sheet cards to all their 
45,000 dealers which tied in Texaco and 
the Opera. They reserve two boxes each 
week at the opera itself for visiting oil 
executives and their wives, and executives 
of the company themselves are frequent 
operagoers. 

Every Texaco ad, whether addressed to 
the trade or to the public, carries a tag- 
line calling readers' attention to both the 
opera broadcasts and the Texaco popular 
music program. The Opera was recently 
featured as one of the reasons-why the 
Canadian Texaco affiliate, McColl-Fron- 
tenac Oil Company, was changing its 
trade-mark from a "Red Indian" to the 
red-white-and-green star trade-mark of 
Texaco. The Opera is heard in Canada. 
Canadians are noted for their love of fine 
music and thus gasoline station operators 
were sold on the change-over, something 
usually difficult to sell any dealer organi- 
zation that has been displaying and selling 
a trade-marked product for years. 

While U. S. Rubber has dropped its 
underwriting of the New York Philhar- 
monic Symphony, General Motors its 
sponsorship of the NBC Symphony, and 
John Hancock the Boston Symphony, and 
the Philadelphia Symphony goes begging, 
Texas has discovered that the long-term 
view pays off, as it usually does in 
broadcasting. 

. . . and a program doesn't have to be 
listened to by a company's retail outlets^ 
to sell. 



43 



^oJo/Me >*• 8 




te3 




cia tronsmission 
For the ««est ^^T * pyADRlUNE! 
install «•« •* 

• • • ■■■^ ■ ^g.L FM TRANSMIT- 

^Mii^ consists of four t simplifies tne . i„g high FM P 

production; obsoletes ^^^^^^^ p^^er outp . ^^ . with 4 Eimac 

U- of one power .. ^^^^kIUNE is PO^-^XbUUv and 

.OMOM.CAL TETRODES-T^e HJL Q ^^ ^^.^ ,,, .^st, ready ^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ,,, 
WITH ECONOMIC^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^ere sele ^^^^^^ ^^ ^°""-" and operating costs. 
■---'' cltU - -iiver ^e.u.ea Po;e jc.^ ^,^^,.e,, .educ.ng first 
proven ^^"^^f^ ^^ i,es far less drwe P 
tetrode an^pUfier req ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^ 

their engineers present ,^ ^^,. j^E is by any standard 

^ w-Pt. OUADRILINE- J perform- 

THESE EM STM^HS •^"l^::!';: ..o»-- -r^-- 





ABBBB 



.SAfiiaj 



I 







4 



DESIGNERS & MANUFACTURERS OF FM EQUIPMENT EXCLUSIVELY 

RADIO ENGINEERING LABORATORIES • INC 



Contests and Oilers 



I n 

II Sr«>.\SOII iiionllilv laliulalioii 



PROGRAM 



AMERICAN MEAT INSTI- 
TUTE 


Institutional 


Fred Waring 


TTh 
10-10:30 am 


Booklet: "Basic Pork Cuts, and How 
to Cook Them" 


Send 10c to sponsor, Chicago 


NBC 


AMERICAN OIL CO. 


Gas, oil, 
tires 


Professor 
Quiz 


Saturday 
10-10:30 pm 


$50 Ciush 


Complete in up to 25 words sentence about 

Amoco product (different weekly). Winner 

gets $25 plus $25 if he included 5 acceptable 

questions and answers for use on program 


ABC 


BLOCK DRUG CO. 


Sterakleen 


Nancy Craig 


MWF 
1:15-1:30 pm 


Trial offer of Sterakleen 


Send 10c and name and address to Nancy 
Craig, c/o station 


WJZ. 
N. Y. 


BOWEVS, INC. 


Dari-Rich 


Stars Over 
Hollywood 


Saturday 
12:30-1 pm 


Valuable stamp for philatelists 


Write sponsor, Chicago 


CBS 


COLGATE-PALMOLIVE- 
PEET CO. 


Colgate 
Toothpaste 


Can You 
Top This? 


Saturday 
8:30-9 pm 


Cash prizes and "Can You Top This" 
gag book 


Prizes if joke sent to program is u.sed 


NBC 


CONTINENTAL BAKING CO. 


Wonder Bread, 
Hostess Cakes 


Grand Slam 


MTWTF 
11:30-11:45 pm 


Various merchandise prizes; cha»ce at 
Grand Slam Bonus 


Send group of 5 music questions to program. 
New York 


CBS 


GENERAL MILLS 


Bisquick, 

Gold Medal 

Flour, 

Cheerios 


Betty Crocker 

Magazine of 

the Air 


MTWTF 
10:25-10:45 pm 


booklet: "Holidays Are Happy Days" 


Request to sponsor, Minneapolis 


ABC 




Light of the 
World 


MTWTF , 
2:45-3 pm 


.booklet: "Save With Interest" (cook- 
ing tips) 


Request to sponsor, Minneapolis 


NBC 


HARRIS ICE CO 


Frozen food 
lockers 


Housewives 
Serenade 


MWSa 


Various food and grocery prizes 


Correct answer given to random telephone quiz 
questions 


WEIM, 

Fitchburg, 

Mass. 


LYNDEN FOOD PRODUCTS 


Canned foods 


Jack Gregson 

Show 


Saturday 
9-9:30 am, pst 


All-expense vacation in Hollywood; 
weekly award of two wrist watches 


Send four-line product jingle to program, c/o 
station 


KNBC. 

San Francisco 


MARS INC. 


Candy 


Dr. I. Q. 


Monday 
9:30-10 pm 


Weekly award of $100 


Best set of six right-and-wrong statements 

mailed to program, Chi., with two Mars 

wrappers 


NBC 


METROPOLITAN LIFE 
INSURANCE CO. 


Insurance 


Eric Sevareid, 
News 


MTWTF L 
6-6:15 pm 


Health booklets 


Free on request to program, c/o local station 


CBS 


PETER PAUL INC. 


Candy 


Eight O'clock 

News 


MTWTF 
8-S:15 am 


Grand prize of $1,000 cash; 1,000 boxes 
of Charcoal Gum 


Write 2-line jingle about product; send with 
wrapper to program, c/o station 


WOR. 
N. Y, 


PET MILK SALES CO. 


Pet Milk 


Mary Lee 
Taylor 


Saturday ^. 
10:30-11 am 


booklet: "Mary Lee Taylor Recipes;" 
"Baby Care" 


Free on request to program, St. Louis 


CBS 


PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE 
CO. OF AMERICA 


Insurance 


Family Hour 


Sunday 
5-5:30 pm 


Copies of talks by various distinguished 
guests 


Request to sponsor, Newark, N. J. 


CBS 


RALSTON PURINA CO. 


Kalston 
cereals 


Tom Mix 


MTWTF 
5:45-6 pm 


Tom Mix fingerprint set and identifica- 
tion bracelet 


Send 15c and boxtop to program, St. Louis 


MBS 


R)NSON ART METAL 
WORKS 


Lighters 


Twenty 
Questions 


Saturday 
8-8:30 pm 


Lighter to sender of subject used; if 

studio contestants stumped, grand 

prize of silver table lighter, matching 

cigarette urn, tray 


Send subject about which 20 questions may be 
asked, to program 


MBS 


MORRIS B. SACHS STORES 


Clothing, 
merchandise 


Sach's ,\niateur 
Hour 


Sundav 

12:30-1:30 pm, 

est 


Replica of Princess Elizabeth's wed- 
ding gown, value $3,000 


Complete statement as to why listener woulJ 
like gown 


WENR 4 
WCFL, 
Chicago 


SCHLUOERBERG-KURDLE 
CO. 


Meats 


It's Fun to 
Cook 


MTWTF 
12:45-1 pm 


Cook book: "Joy of Cooking" 


Mail correct answers to true-and-false cooking 
questions to program, c/o station 


WFBR, 
Baltimore 


TEXAS CO. 


Institutional 


Metropolitan 
Opera 


Saturday 
2 pm to close 


National membership in Metropolitan 

Opera Guild, subscription to "Opera 

News" 


Send $4.00 to Met. Opera Guild, N. Y. 


ABC 


TONI CO. 


• 

Toni Home 

Permanent 


Give and 
Take 


Saturday 
2-2:30 pm 


Various cash and merchandise prizes 
of brand-name goods 


Listeners write correct answers to questions 
missed by studio audience 


CBS 


WILLIAMSON CANDY 


Oh Henry 


Detective 
Mysteries 


Sunday 
4:30-5 pm 


$100 reward from "True Detective 
Mysteries" Magazine 


Notify FBI and magazine of information lead- 
ing to arrest of criminal named on broadcast 


MBS 


I^^^^^I^^H^^H^^^I^^^^^^HI^^^^HH^^HIIHI 



JANUARY 1948 



45 




The best from Tin Pan Alley, Hollywood 
and the Classics by the Superb 
Sixteen- Voiced SERENADERS 



Now you can sponsor the sinking group with 
the longest continuous record on the air of 
any vocal organization . . . almost 600 broad- 
casts over CBS. Every member is a star in his 
own right with a background of top-show 
participation. 

Seventy-eight separate fifteen-minute episodes 
are available, each a program gem directed by 



Emile Cote and with Warren Sweeney of New 
York Philharmonic fame acting as commen- 
tator and musical host. Opening, inside, and 
closing commercials. 

No finer musical talent of its type exists today. 
WINGS OF SONG is a program series Mith 
tremendous popular appeal, made possible by 
the skillful selection of diversified musical 
numbers. 

Write for audition disc, details 
on special commercials by Mr. 
(>ote and Mr. Sweeney, [and 
other facts. 




AMERICA'S 



I 



An outstanding High-Hooper Show with 
the famous MULLEN SISTERS and 
CHARLIE MAGN ANTE'S Orchestra 



GREATEST RADIO 
SALESMAN 



Thei'^ is only one Singin' Sam and what a selling job 
he haL done for scores of sponsors . . . and can do for 
you. Singin' Sam sells because he gets the ratings and 
gets the response. 



WOW Omaha 

WTAM Cleveland 

CKEY Toronto 

CJAD Montreal 



18.1 at 6:30 P.M. 
12.4 at 6:00 P.M. 
12.9 at 7:30 P.M. 
14.8 at 7:30 P.M. 



And according to the Conlan survey, the percentage of 
tune-in at WISH in Indianapolis was doubled in first 
three months on the air . . . 14.6 to 30.4. 

Yes, Sam is doing a spectacidar job. His fifteen minute 
shows have been heard on over 200 stations for scores of 
sponsors. 

Write for audition disc and full details on special com- 
mercials by Sam, availabilities, etc. 




117 W. High St.. Springiield/Ohio 
Telephone 2-4974 

^NMichigan Ave.. Chicago. 111.. Superior 3053 



Transcription Sales, Inc. 
117 West High Street 
Springfield, Ohio 

Please send me complete data on 
D Singin' Sam 
D Wings of Song 

Name 

Company 

Street 

City State . 



over-ail 



The fase for 




Your Radio Program 



Network programs on the air 
which are owned by sponsors 
amount to less than 10 per cent of all the 
commercial entertainment broadcast. 
That doesn't mean that many buyers of 
network broadcast advertising wouldn't 
like to own their own shows. As a matter 
of record there are a number of other 
sponsors who have leases on their pro- 
grams as long as they stay with the 
same advertising agency where they are 
now. Agencies control 30.5 per cent of 
all the coast'to-coast web shows. In 
many cases the "control" is shared by the 
broadcast advertiser using the vehicle, 
because the shows have been especially 
designed by the agency for the sponsor. 

The great percentage of commercial 
programs are packages. Fifty'Seven and 
ninc'tenths per cent of the sponsored pro- 
grams on chains are package programs 
bought by the agencies and or the spon- 
sors complete and ready for the micro- 
phone. Of this 57.9 per cent networks 
own 16.3 and independent package pro- 
gram producers, talent agents, or the 
talent itself, 41.6 per cent. 

Stations themselves own only 1.8 per 
cent of the network programs. There are 
very few programs fed to the networks by 
individual stations so this 1.8 figure is no 
surprise. 

The case for building or buying is one 
on which it's difficult for a sponsor to 
arrive at a clear-cut verdict. In theory 
every sponsor would like to build his own 
program or have his agency build it for 
him. In fact this is not only impossible 
but in many cases it's not even desirable. 
Most sponsors plan their advertising budg- 



Edgar Bersen, Charlie McCarthy program owner, arid writing staff. Left to right. Royal Foster, Bergen, Zeno Klinker, Allen Smith, Marge Peterson 





KEEPS BUSY 



Like the proverbial bee, WBRM makes good use of its time — all 
the time. Both on the air— and off. Like this: 

Critic John Crosby reported: "...a vitality glowed brightly 
all sunnner in a stistaining program on WBBM called 'Report 
Uncensored' which set the town on its ears. 'Report Uncensored' sub- 
stituted during the sunnner months for the immensely poptdar'Lux 
Theatre' and its Hooperating dropped only t^vo points." This 
WBBM docmnentary on juvenile delincjuency was a smash hit on 
the air becatise WBBM \\riters and producers spent more than four 
months off tlie air perfecting each program in the series. 

Or take another example. Because of WBBM's passion for 
perfection, tomorrow morning (and six mornings a week) thousands 
of Midwesterners will "Listen to Cliff". . .will hear the breakfast 
antics of the suburban Cliff Johnson family including four ad libbing 
yoinigsters. It's a show that can set advertisers — as ^\■ell as listeners— 
"on tlieir ears." All because WBBM took the time (7:30 to 8:00) 
and added showmanship to a popular morning musical clock show. 

It simply means yoti get more than just time on WBBM. You 
get time that has been put to brilliant use by WBBM— a local origi- 
nation that represents hours of imaginati\'e thinking by WBBM sho^v- 
men. To put our time (and our talent) to x^^^f^^ good use, 
make a bee-line for Radio Sales or direct to /EnSJ'v, ^"^ ':; WBBM 
—"Chicago's Showmanship Station." 



Represented by Radio Sales ...Radio Stations Representatix'e ...CBS, 
New York, Chicago, Los .-intieles. Detroit. San Francisco. .Atlanta 

Chicago's Showmanship Station • Columbia Owned • 50,000 watts 




Willi 0\vii^» riiiiiiiii^iM*uil l*i*ii;j;rsiiii<«» iiii Ai^iwiirk^^ 







PACKAGE 












NET 


AGENCY 


PRODUCER 


NETWORK 


STATION 


CLIENT 


TOTAL 




ABC 


19 


84 


15 





5 


63 




CBS 


16 


33 


14 


1 


7 


71 




MBS 


11 


27 


5 


3 


7 


53 




NBC 


38 


31 


11 


1 


8 


89 




TOTAL 


84 


115 


45 


5 


27 


276 


PER CENT 


30.5 


41.6 


16.3 


1.8 


9.8 


100 



ets for a 12-month period. The presi- 
dent, board of directors, sales manager, 
and advertising director go into executive 
session and decide what has to be done. 
In most planning there is long-range 
thinking but immediate sales are far more 
important to executives who desire to 
hold their positions than the long-range 
prospects. 

Thus the need for immediate results 
takes precedence over slowly building a 
buying acceptance for the product. Few 
corporations can take several bad years 
without the stockholders calling for some- 
one's scalp. Even a Henry Ford III 
jumps at buying Fred Allen with his 
Hooper of 23.2, Nielsen "total audience" 



rating of 22.3 (October 19). The Ford 
organization was sold on doing a long- 
term broadcast advertising job building 
its own Ford Theater. Yet on this same 
October 19 the Ford Theater was tabbed 
4.0 by Hooper, 9.6 by Nielsen total audi- 
ence tabbing. Ford has a competitive 
situation now, not next year, and business 
operations don't wait for audiences tc 
build listening habits. 

What caused Ford to buy Fred Allen is 
what causes most sponsors to buy pack- 
ages rather than build them. Ford has 
thus far confounded the critics by sticking 
with his Ford Theater at the same time 
that he's using Fred Allen. Few budgets 
are big enough for a sponsor to build a 



program and buy another at the same 
time. It does put a strain on the corpor- 
ate bankroll, and even great corporations 
like General Foods won't continue to 
stand a strain like this unless the program 
being built delivers a fair audience within 
a year. When General Foods decided to 
offer the daytime listener some fare other 
than the travail of soap operas, it pre- 
sented a mystery series, Two on a Clue, 
which was nursed for a year (with real 
promotion) before it was replaced with 
another hearts and flowers serial. 

Building programs makes contributions 
beyond the audiences which the programs 
gather. Du Font's Cavalcade of America 
(Please turn to page 68) 



Checking "Light of the World," J. Manning, Joan Vitey, J. Fleming, Charlotte Lawrence, Loughrane, B. Doig, Angle Strickland, and C. Webster 




W' 



WOttlPWf 



BY 100,000 






100,000 VISITORS EYE LIVE SHOWS! 
NEW ATTENDANCE RECORD AT WFBR! 

Loyalty Factor means WFBR 
is Baltimore's "PLUS" Station ! 

Here's a statistic: Every year, ten per cent of the popu- 
-^; lotion of Baltimore visits the studios of WFBR! They see 

one or more /»ve broadcasts, visit modern studios in 
action, view product displays (yours can be one!) and 
take home "Let's Listen" — house organ of WFBR. These 
visitors are a real loyalty factor — WFBR is radio 
to them! 

Next time you're looking over your Baltimore radio 
budget, make a thorough check on 




ABC BASIC NETWORK • 5000 WATTS 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN 

JANUARY 1948 



IN BALTIMORE, MD. 
BLAIR & COMPANY 



51 




4TIOX 




Edward Sobol, award-winnins WNBT producer 



><& 



IS 



Although the agency's im- 
portance in TV is increas- 
ing, in only a few cases is an 
agency TV director in actual charge of his 
program once it goes on the air. In prac- 
ticalK' no case does the agency producer 
talk directly to the floor crew while the 
program is being telecast. Where an 
agency man is in actual charge of the pro- 
duction his instructions are relayed to the 
camera men and stagehands through the 
station technical director (td). This is 
isecause the men handling the camera, 
lights, sets, and props know their td's 
language and can't be expected to under- 
stand what each individual agency man 
may want. 

It is generally felt that the station is re- 
sponsible for getting good picture quality 
on the air. And even the agency men in- 
volved in TV production admit that by 
and large video will move along more 
quickly if on-the-air production is left in 
the hands of the men who do the job 
daily. Most agency men, however, feel 
that it's the other fellow who would put 
an unsatisfactory program on the air — he 
himself could be trusted with full responsi- 
bility. Station men, for their part, aver 
that 90 per cent of the ad-agency execu- 
tives aren't equipped to produce television 
programs now. 

Until recently the entire on-the-air re- 
sponsibility of NBC-TV rested with 
NBC's own producer^. Today, while 
their instructions still must pass through 
the td, acceptable agency producers put 
on their own programs. At CBS pro- 
grams are handled by Columbia men 
since, to quote the network, "no agency 
has asked to direct a full program over 
station WCBS-TV." Recently one agency 
did request permission to produce its own 
commercial and this was okayed. For the 
record CBS has stated that it would be 
"open minded" on the subject should an 
agency make the request to produce an 
entire program. There's no rule on this 
point at CBS. 

SPONSOR 



responsible for what in W 



At the DuMont stations and network, 
the agency television producer, almost 
since WABD returned to the air towards 
the end of the war, has been kingpin. 
DuMont threw open its facilities practi' 
cally 100 percent to agency radio men who 
wanted to learn the visual ropes. Several 
top television men learned their TV abc's 
at DuMont. DuMont's program quality 
has suffered during the formative years of 
TV (just as Balaban and Katz's WBKB 
in Chicago) but the advertising medium 
has profited. Since there were very few 
sets in use during '44, '45, and '46, utiliz- 
ing the air as a television school room 
during this period has paid off. 

Most sponsors feel responsibility to- 
wards television — as entertainment or as 
broadcast advertising. A few, like Gen- 
eral Foods, feel that the advertiser has a 
tripartite responsibility along with the 
broadcasting industry (the stations) and 
the advertising agencies. They have 
arrived at this conclusion because since 
they will eventually present the cream of 
the air's visual entertainment, they feel 
they should help direct the growth of the 
baby medium — for their own protection. 

General Foods has decided, based upon 
an intensive research study, that tele- 
vision in New York is already a solid 
advertising medium. They will use more 
time in 1948 based upon their experi- 
mental use of the medium in 1947. They 
will both buy and produce their own pro- 
grams. In New York and other markets 
in which they use the visual air they will 
also merchandise their programs. Their 
approach briefly is, when you're in show 
business, you merchandise as well as 
advertise what you have. And when they 
use broadcast advertising — standard as 
well as FM or sight-and-sound — General 
Foods recognizes that it's in show busi- 
ness. 

Sponsors can either produce their own 
programs, through their agencies, or have 
the stations do it for them. In most 
areas, outside of New York, both agencies 

JANUARY 1948 



and sponsors have been happy to have the 
station develop vehicles for them. So far, 
there are very few men who know what 
visual programing is all about. They are 
tied up with stations, not because the sta- 
tions pay more money but because only 
stations can provide them with enough 
programing experience for them to have a 
real control of the medium. TV is ex- 
panding so rapidly that last year's back- 
ground is insufficient for this year's use of 
television. Every advertising medium 
claims it's the fastest growing of them all. 
With TV it's true. 

Sponsors can hire their own talent, have 
the program scripted, scenery built, props 
hired, in fact can generally do everything 
except control the program while it's on 
the air. In most cases, aside from approv- 
ing talent, they are content to leave the 
entire matter to their agencies and out-of- 
town, to the stations. 

In the field of research, practically 
everyone agrees that sponsor, agency, 
and station must work together, because 
each has certain things he wants re- 
searched. All profit from the figures de- 
veloped, so all should share in the ex- 
penses and thus far have been willing to 
do so. Goodyear Tire and Rubber spent 
a sizable sum in 1946 to d scover what was 
what with sporting events. N. W. Ayer, 
their agency, and NBC, owner of the sta- 
tion they were using, shared in the ex- 
penses and contributed certain facilities. 

The commercial is the great unexplored 
area of television. The entertainment 
portion of a telecast has the experience of 
the theater, vaudeville, and motion pic- 
tures to draw upon. Only in the case of 
motion pictures has there been any adver- 
tising and then it has not been of a type 
that can be translated to the visual air. 
Therefore sponsors have to experiment, to 
find out what will sell without irritation. 
One picture, if the Chinese are to be 
believed, is worth a thousand words — but 
it has to be the right picture. 

For many reasons, camera failure for 



the next few years will be more frequent 
than facilities failures were during the 
early days of broadcasting. Radio had 
been operating all over the nation for 
years before advertising entered the field. 
This is not, of course, true with TV. 
Stations have commercials during the first 
week of operation. WTMJ-TV (Mil- 
waukee) had nine sponsors to start and 
14 before the first week of operation was 
over. It had, however, had months of dry 
runs before it went on the air. On the 
other hand a station in Baltimore had a 
camera conk out on it the opening night. 

When they castigated the manufac- 
turer it developed that they had made no 
attempt to rehearse before going on the 
air. 

The problem of failure of cameras, 
relay, coaxial cable, or any other elec- 
tronic part of TV while on the air will not 
recur frequently, but frequently enough 
to raise the question as to who will 
shoulder the expense involved in the pro- 
duction that is not aired. In radio, talent 
costs are paid for by the station or the 
network when equipment failure kills a 
broadcast. These costs can be staggering 
in video, since they'll include rehearsal 
costs which are frequently more sizable 
than the actual telecast bill. 

Most stations aver that they'll have to 
recompense the sponsor, if some other 
telecast time can't be worked out. A few 
stations state that the risk should be 
shared by sponsor and station. There is 
still another group of stations, a small 
group but an outspoken one, which says 
"There aren't going to be any equipment 
failures at our station." 

Program promotion on the air is ad- 
mittedly a station responsibility. Each 
telecast has to be sold to the viewing audi- 
ence since there is very little continuity of 
program appeal at this time. All stations 
have Previews of Things to Come on the 
air. Some of the telecasters want it 
known that they'll be able to sell forth- 
coming shows better if the agencies and 



53: 



i 

■ 



sponsors work more closely with them in 
making talent available for preview 
scannings. 

On publicity, stations state that ail 
three, agency, sponsor, and outlets, must 
work together for the protection of the 
medium. To quote Raymond E. Nelson, 
TV pioneer and agency man, "television 
needs an honest press, even if it hurts 
sometimes.'" He points out that every 
new agency or sponsor that comes into the 
medium rushes into print with wide all- 
inclusive claims about what they're going 
to do — and what they do usually turns 
out to be a station break. It's easy to 
understand that any agency or sponsor 
public relations man will think that what 
his client is going to do on the air is a 
"first." It's just as logical that nine 
times out of 10 it's old hat. Only a 
publicity man at a station or a network can 
hope to keep track of what 's new and news. 

It's obvious that stations won't be able 
to control publicity releases. However, if 
sponsor and agency press agents will clear 



with the station news men they'll find 
that their releases will find more news- 
paper and trade paper acceptance. Many 
releases that aren't correct get by editors 
who can't be expected to know a great 
deal about television now. However, 
after an item is published there are always 
a number of readers who call the editor's 
"error" to his attention. That makes it 
tough the next time to get a good press 
for legitimate television news. 

Sponsors have already invested several 
hundreds of thousands of dollars in de- 
veloping both commercial and program 
techniques. Television, unlike radio, has 
to uncover new entertainment forms. 
The latter, except in the case of docu- 
mentaries, has little to show creatively for 
its quarter of century of existence — except 
jingle selling. Television isn't motion 
pictures, it isn't the theater. It isn't just 
vision added to sound broadcasting. It 
doesn't permit the imagination to build 
a never-never land, projected from the 
quilted tones of an announcer. It offers 



Writers on the air 
anti wliat tliey eost 



Although the contract between the 
four networks and the Radio Writers' 
Guild will not be fully operative until 
March 13, it is already a bone of con- 
tention between the advertising 
agencies and the writers. The 
agencies are making it plain that they 
do not feel bound by any agreement 
reached between the webs and the 
writers. 

Nevertheless it is fairly certain 
that the terms won by the writers 
will govern most of what is heard on 
the air, commercial or otherwise. 

Some of the vital points which 
affect all commercial programs in- 
clude the fact that when a writer 
does a script for a recognized pro- 
gram the script rights revert to him 
although before reselling it he must 
change the names and characters if 
they are a regular part of the pro- 
gram. If a writer creates a program 
the title of the program and the chief 
characters are his even after he ceases 
to write it. 

Air credit must be given writers of 
five-a-week programs at least twice 
a week. When programs are ghost- 
written it is not necessary to give 

54 



credits to the ghost writer. 

Repeats of program material 
(though not on the same day) must 
be paid for at 50 per cent of the fee 
for the original broadcast. Subsidi- 
ary rights (other than radio) of 
scripts during the six-months period 
that the buyers holds exclusive rights 
if sold are shared equally between 
buyer and writer. After the exclu- 
sive period all subsidiary rights re- 
vert to the writer. 

A semi-closed shop has been agreed 
upon by the networks and RWG. 
The Guild has the right to demand 
that nine out of 10 writers at any 
network be members. 

Typical of the writers' fees agreed 
upon are: 

Proftram One a week Five a week 

Lenfith Sust (k>miTi Sust Cumm 

.S min $i.S. $60. $IO.S. $1«0. 

10 min $50. $80. $1.S0. $240 

1.S Riln $/.'>. $120. $225. iM,0. 

30 min $150. $2.50. $400. $640. 

45 min $225. $.<60. $575. $<»20 

60 min $.<.50. $525. $7.50. $1,320 

15-mln serials $200. $250. 

These rates arc all subject to a 
20 per cent discount when the writer 
is given a 13-week non-cancellable 
contract. 



escape into another reality — the land 
brought into the home on the face of the 
video tube. 

There isn't enough money in all the 
entertainment world to develop a tech- 
nique for TV. It must come from com- 
mercial sponsorship. It must come from 
sponsorship other than that of sporting 
and public events. These telecasts are the 
present-day prop which is helping stations 
pay their bills — and sponsors collect 
quickly on the medium. Underwriters of 
prizefights, hockey games, football, base- 
ball, and basketball scannings are using 
TV as an advertising medium and expect 
to obtain quick response — like one brewer 
who increased his sales in New York bars 
and grills immediately after he sponsored 
his first professional football game. 

Sponsors must be willing to take the 
chance of giving an agency producer a free 
hand to uncover and establish not only 
entertainment formulas for the medium 
but effective commercials. Sponsors must 
be willing to have their agencies and their 
own advertising managers make mistakes 
for only through their errors will the 
formula for selling with good taste be un- 
covered. The sponsor who insists that 
every telecast pay off at once is the one 
who won't obtain anything like the maxi- 
mum results from using vision on the air. 
Lever Bros, spent a considerable sum of 
money during the early days over WABD 
(DuMont) to see if a variation of the soap 
opera formula would hold an audience. 
Lee Cooley, now with McCann-Erickson, 
at that time with Ruthrauff & Ryan, 
scanned his bathtub girls, his love scenes 
on a hilltop and the typical despair of the 
daytime radio dramas. He didn't do 
them as radio but translated, as he saw it, 
the appeal to the visual medium. It was 
good. It taught the Lux folks a lot. The 
soap organization from Cambridge, Mass., 
are going to be in TV. They recognized 
their responsibilities early. Of course they 
also helped Lee Cooley to a better job. 
That's a plus for TV because he's certain 
to innoculate other agency men with his 
enthusiasm for selling on the air. 

Selling via any new medium comes 
hard. It can't be learned in a night. It's 
the responsibility of all sponsors who can 
afford it to set aside an experimental nest 
egg to spend in finding out what TV is all 
about. The best men in the field are the 
first to admit that the> don't know the 
answer -yet. 

There are very few clear-cut responsi- 
bilities for sponsors, agencies, and sta- 
tions that don't overlap. Even when it 
comes to paying for programs and air 
time, most stations frankly are paying 
part of the bill. 

SPONSOR 




/^ 



... in six delicious mythical Izaak Walton flavors! is 
typical of the big parade of attention-commanding "commercials" (?) 
heard on WRVA's 50,000 watt "Jughead's Jukebox". Anything 
and everything can happen on this show — and usually does. That's why 
the "faithful" in this area stay tuned to unpredictable Don Meyer, 
who emcees this red-hot platter show at 11:15 P. M. to Midnight, 
Monday thru Friday. You can fish along with Jughead Don on a one- 
minute spot. Because when he does a rumba he always keeps a 
stiff upper hip, with his usual (normal) eccentricities. He isn't odd — just 
uneven. Disc jockeys don't have to be like that, but it helps. But who cares ... as 
long as huckster Don gets the listeners and you make the sales (and profits!). 
Be an opportunist and open the door before Opportunity knocks. Get 

the rest of the dope from Radio Sales. 




p,v.v.m^i-.^ ^^A M^^f^iu Ty;^^j^;a 



WMID 



PEORIAREA 



• • • say the latest 
Hooperatings"^ 

Station Listening; Index, showing each 
station's share of audience for tlie times 
shown: 



MORNINGS 
(8 to 12) 



mi 

Outside 
Stations 



PEORIAREA STATIONS 
A 


10.B 

■ i 




■■ '' 



WM6D A 6 C D E 



AFTERNOONS Z^ 

(12 to 6) S'^'iios 




I 

i 



WMBD ABODE 



EVENINGS g^ 

18 to lOj m 

P<on«rc« ttaliont A, C, and D ^H 

sign off «l local lunset. ^^^k 

■ 1. 




WMBD 



' Pcood Summer, 1947 




PEORIA 

CBS Affiliate • SOOO Walt* | 
Frc« A Ptttri, Inc., Nal'l. Rtpt. 




Koow ie Prodoeef 





Oljifa llruce' 



She's press-agent, propasandisl, and producer oF 
"House oF Mystery" 

Although she looks more like a female lead in a collegiate 
musical, Olga Druce's interest in good juvenile radio goes 
far beyond her weekly stint in a Mutual control room as producer 
of the socially'Conscious House of Mystery for General Foods. 
She frequently takes time out of her hectic production schedule 
for lecture appearances, making field trips (at General Foods 
expense) to address educators and lawmakers on the subject of 
children's programs. 

No run'of'the'mill thriller, House of Mystery brings to its 
Sunday afternoon family audience a primarily entertaining pro- 
gram, using logic and fact to expose superstition and the super- 
natural. In this respect. House of Mystery somewhat resembles 
Superman (Olga once wrote that air strip) but she is not afraid 
to sell her sponsor on doing an amusing fantasy or special event 
during holiday seasons. 

The personable brunette disagrees with audience composition 
reports showing children to be just 23 per cent of her show's 
audience. From her own experience, Olga believes it's at least 
twice that amount or higher. She also takes issue with radio 
die-hards who claim there must be a lurid murder every five 
minutes to get a good rating on mysteries; she says that suspense, 
change of pace, and good writing are the success gimmicks. 
Above all, Olga says, she never allows her scripts to "talk down" 
to the youngsters, adding that "skilled writing is simple writing." 

Her radio and theatrical background is varied and thorough. 
Olga has done much social and consultant radio work, plus major 
acting roles on Broadway and a hitch with the American Theatre 
Wing. This spring, Olga Druce plans to delve into regional folklore 
on House of Mystery, and to carry further her own campaign for 
better shows for young dialers. 

* With John Cirii/fis {Ho^er Ellial on prograni) 



56 



SPONSOR 




NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY 



Butte, Montana 
May 16, 19A7 



Mr. Arne Anzjon, Ivianager 
Radio Station KXLF 
Butte, Montana 



Dear Arne: 

Just a line to let you know what we accomplished 
during the "Parade of Products" week on Honey Maid 
Grahams. 

We were successful in installing 72 major dis- 
plays and many smaller ones. There were a total of 
123 stores who actively participated during the week. 

Easing our sales increase on the week previous 
to the activity, our gain v/as 8755, with a 56^ gain 
during the week following. 

V/e consider the drive very successful. Previous 
experience has taught us that we can expect favorable 
reaction throughout the year as you continue to tie-in 
with our "Top of the News" program. 

May we offer the supgestion that future campaigns 
be set up two weeks in advance? 

In our opinion the displays and the advertising 
material should all be in place about one week before 
you opnn your program on the air. 

Very truly yours. 




ti 




Bo« 1956— Butte, Montono 

Symons Building— Spokane, Wosh. 

Orpheum 31dg- — Portlond, Oregon 

6381 Hollywood Bl.'d —Hollywood 28 

79 Post St.— Son Froncisco 4 

The Wolker Co., 15 W. lOth St , Konsos City 

The Wolker Co., 360 N. Mich , Chicogo 

The Walker Co , 551 5th Ave, New York 

The Walker Co., 330 Henn. A»e., Minneapolis 



"HOME TOWN" 



STATIONS 



JANUARY 1948 



57 




Mr. Sponsor Asks... 

"Ill what ua>> uill a '\\ *n*iu\ taslr <*o<l<' 
have lo <linV'r IVoiii iIh' r<'<'<'iillv-|)r<»|)os<Ml 
NAB staii<lar(i> ^A' |)racti<'<'? ** 



_, . . _ ,1 Director of Advertising and Sales Promotion 

Charles J. toward | Kelvinator Division of NashKelvinstor Corporation 



1 



I 

I 




answers 
3lr. riiwartl 



1 believe a tele- 
vision code of good 
taste is a "must." 
Television is really 
a visitor in the 
home — performers 
must comport 
themselves with 
dignity, restraint, 
and exceptional 
good taste. Dia- 
logue and situations which are perfectly 
proper for the theater or motion picture 
audience will not necessarily be accept- 
able in the home. A phrase or sentence 
which on a radio program might be innocu- 
ous could, if coupled with a certain gesture, 
take on an entirely different meaning 
and be offensive. 

Undoubtedly most television producers 
and station operators initially will make 
every effort to operate within a frame- 
work of restraint, but sooner or later 
competition will assert its influence and 
is apt to effect a loosening of control and a 
lapse of good judgment and good taste. 
Radio has shown the need of constant 
supervision to keep its comedy clean. 
Television should never allow itself to 
step over the border line. 

The motion picture situation is a case 
in point. How many people know that 
the so-called Hays Code was actually 
created from thousands of complaints re- 
ceived from the public? At its inception 
it was really the public's code. Without 
its restraining influence the motion pic- 



ture industry would be constantly under 
fire because experience shows that self- 
regulation is necessary. The words "self 
regulation" are well taken, I believe, 
because 1 feel certain that if the television 
industry doesn't prepare its own code and 
live up to it scrupulously, some organiza- 
tion — or the government itself — will pre- 
pare a code for it. This is a situation 
which should never occur. 1 believe it is 
definitely the Television Broadcasters 
Association's responsibility to prepare a 
code. Let's get our house in order now 
and keep it in order. 

Ralph B. Austrian 
Vp in charge of television 
Foote, ConejCi' Belding, N. Y. 



In any discus- 
sion of a "Good 
Taste" code for 
television com- 
pared to the same 
for radio, it must 
be kept in mind 
that in television 
the element of im- 
Thus reality be- 
comes the dominant factor, and we are 
into a realm where audience reaction will 
be decidedly more positive. Since we in 
television are dealing with the same home 
audience, it is a foregone conclusion that 
the existing regulations and the non- 
acceptance code of the radio broadcasters 
will be elements for governing the con- 
duct of television broadcasters. In addi- 
tion, if there must be a written code, it 
will be necessary to include the elements 
appearing in a strict interpretation of the 
rules laid down for its o\ati conduct by the 
motion picture industry. Beyond the 
written code, however, there will always 
lie that uncertain and indefinable area 
where the individual telecaster must apply 
his own interpretation of what constitutes 
good taste or bad taste for the majority of 
his audience, and the ability of the indi- 




agination is gone. 



vidua! telecaster to interpret this accept- 
ability factor will be a direct measure of 
the length of time he stays in business. 

It is too early for us to establish time 
allowances for commercial segments in 
television programs or to make rules 
governing their frequency or position in 
the continuity. However, it is not too 
early for us to study the ways and means 
whereby an advertiser can be saved from 
self-abuse, and it is decidedly to our own 
advantage to study the methods by which 
he can maintain his identity. 

There is no doubt of the eventual need 
for a written code for television broad- 
casters which will govern both his own 
conduct and that of his advertiser, but 
first we must establish the basic principles 
on which and from which this code can be 
built. 

Captain William C. Eddy 
Director oj television 
Balaban & Katz, Chicago 






Television, like 
radio, comes di- 
rectly into the 
home and there- 
fore all precau- 

tions which have 

j^ ~ n ^^ been taken to 

^^^^^^^r guard broadcast- 

^^^^^^f t^^ ing and render 
^^B^ ^ i^l domestically ac- 
ceptable may 
automatically be assumed to be equally 
essential for television. The course to be 
followed must always be in the public 
interest since what is done in television 
stations will come before the scrutiny of 
millions of ej-es. 

It should be recognized that television 
is a potent force for tremendous good, or a 
weapon for evil if improp>erly handled; a 
utility that outstrips all others in uni- 
versal appeal— one that looms not only as 
a great aid toward the achievement of 
international good-will and lasting peace, 
but as an important challenge and a re- 



58 



SPONSOR 



sponsibility to those who elect to harness 
its potentialities. 

If it is to succeed as the greatest means 
•of mass communication yet conceived, 
and as a monumental contribution to 
public service, it must be clean and 
wholesome, completely tolerant, fair in all 
public issues, and a welcome visitor to the 
American home. 

The Television Broadcasters Associa- 
tion, through its surveys and research, 
has learned that present broadcasters of 
television are making a careful study into 
a suitable technique for the presentation 
of religious programs. This problem will 
in time be worked out satisfactorily. 

Freedom of discussion in public affairs 
and controversial issues is also being 
studied, so that televisers will know how 
best to treat this wholly American form of 
television and radio. The TBA has found 
all televisers unanimous in wishing to pre- 
serve the traditions of freedom of speech 
and methods are being worked out that 
should meet with public approval. 

It is scarcely necessary to call attention 
to the dangers in the presentation of the 
drama. This is the most interesting and 
treacherous field for television. The 
drama appeals to both old and young, and 
has its own traditions based on the living 
stage, and a secondary set derived from 
the motion picture. It is too early to 
dogmatize about whether television shall 
be governed by these traditions, or 
whether it will develop its own standards 
and techniques. But television faces 
peculiarities in its medium which compel 
it to find its own way by bold and intelli- 
gent experimentation. It can directly 
copy neither the living stage, nor the 
cinema, even if it would. 

Meantime, because it comes directly 
into the home, television will almost cer- 
tainly find it necessary to exercise caution 
and a measure of restraint in the plays 
which at the outset, at least, it offers for 
public consumption. 

The theater has achieved a license 
which harks back to the Restoration 
drama, and not a few of the things there 
to be seen and heard are certainly unfit 
for a medium which finds its way into the 
ordinary American home, where stand- 
ards of purity and decency are still any- 
thing but extinct. 

No form of entertainment lends itself 
to looseness and questionable material so 
much as comedy. This is true in the 
whole amusement world. Televisers are 
giving careful study to all material so that 
a high standard of clean wholesome pro- 
grams may be maintained on all tele- 
vision stations in the country. 

{Please turn to page 60) 




"HOOPERATINGS:" in 194-, WFBM was tops in 
Total Rated Time Periods more than any other Indian- 
apolis station. 

"STANDARD RATE AND DATA:" More listeners 
per dollar is an accepted fact among national and local 
advertisers who consistently buy WFBM. 

"BROADCAST MEASUREMENT BUREAU:' An 

over-all higher percentage of listeners in central Indiana 
counties than any other reported Indianapolis station. 

"MERCHANDISING:" Special field work and per- 
sonal retail contact . . . every week in the vear. 

"PROMOTION:" Taxiposters, point-of-sale, theater 
play-bills, newspaper, direct mail . . . hard punching and 
consistent. 



PERFORMANCE:" Live or transcribed shows or 



announcennents receive skilled and professional 
attention in the details of experienced broad- 
casting. 




^s 



BASIC AFFILIATE: Columbia Broadcasting System 



Represented Nationally by The Katz Agency 



JANUARY 1948 



59 



s 

■ 

i 




MR. SPONSOR ASKS: 

{Contiuued Jrom page 59) 

The television industry must dedicate 
its efforts to maintaininjj intejjrity and 
deccnc)' in this wonderful new art. If 
caution is observed, the responsibility to 
the masses of the people who will com- 
prise the tremendous audiences in the 
near future shall have been met. The 
imposition of common sense upon our- 
selves is the greatest responsibility of all. 

J. R. POPPELE 

Vp in charge of engineering 
WOR, N. Y. 

In so far as the 
wording of any 
such code is con- 
cerned, a code for 
television would 
differ only super- 
ficially from a code 
for radio. We 
must not lose sight 
of the fact that 
when television 
completely supplants what we now know 
as radio (and it surely will supplant it!), 
it will still be broadcasting. Except for 
the obvious differences the coming of 
vision will bring, the industry will con- 
tinue to operate on much the same broad 
principles. An extension of any good 
taste code so that it will apply as well to 
the things we see as to the things we hear, 
would not be difficult : a change of wording 
here and there, and provision for certain 
wholly visual subjects. For example, the 
sentence, "Sound effects, calculated to 
mislead, shock, or unduly alarm the 
listener, etc.," might be changed to read, 
"Sound and visual effects, calculated to 
mislead, shock, or unduly alarm the 
viewer, etc." Provision would have to be 
made for questions of costuming, dancing, 
and love-making. And so on. 

The question in my mind is not so 
much how the codes might differ, but 
whether the NAB code is a code at all, and 
whether it will do for either radio or tele- 
vision that which needs to be done. A 
study of the proposed radio code reveals 
that it is more a statement of good inten- 
tions than "standards of practice." It 
states such universall>-accepted precepts 
of good taste that there can be dissension 
on hardly any of its points, but it does not 
give the broadcaster very much of what 
he needs to go by. It encourages the 
"good" and abhors the "evil" but it does 
not — because such generalities cannot — ■ 
draw the clear line that is needed between 
the two. No broadcaster needs to be en- 
joined against, for example, "suggcstive- 
ness" ; what he does need is guidance (.and 



60 



protection) in that realm of in-between 
where the blacks and whites become grays 
and where errors of judgment can easily 
be made. He needs to have "suggestive- 
ness" nailed down and defined, and then 
he needs some way of knowing inescap- 
ably when his material falls within or 
without the boundaries. 

For such purposes the proposed code 
does not suffice for radio and even less for 
television. Because of the greater lati- 
tude of vision, the broadcaster will need 
much more guidance (and hence protec- 
tionV A raised evehrow. a smirk, n )t 



sh >wn in the script, may give a line a 
different and dangerous meaning. The 
telecaster will need more than a statement 
of good intentions; he will need severe 
censorship, either of his own structure or 
of a "Johnston Office." Arid in the event 
that the industry should agree on a 
central enforcement or p,)licing agency, 
this would entail vast complications. Ap- 
proval of scripts in advance will not 
always suffice. Air-checks for television 
may be too costly. It may require an 
industry censor, replacing the broad- 
' Please turn to paoe 64^ 



WMBR 



JACKSONVILLE 
CBS in North Florida 



Represented by Avery — K n o d e I 



I 



15 now 



I 



5000 
WATTS 



SPONSOR 




Personality! 



Thiyelphia^fltfonivitl) 



That's what builds and holds 
listt'iicrship lor any radio sta- 
tion. Antl in the Philadelphia area. . 
the nation's third market. . there is 
a station with personality plus. It's 
KYW, whose facilities and pro- 
gramming have Iniilt lor it a per- 
sonality that's increasing both listen- 
ership and sales lor spot ad\'ertisers. 

II your aim is to impress an all- 
around audience, the KY\^' per- 
sonality can help vou make Iricnds 
and influence sales. 

For example, the KYW morning 
"musical clock" is doing a magnifi- 
cent job for several spot-advertis- 
ers. . among them Gadget-of-the- 
JMonth Club. In this connection, 
read the lollovving excerpt from a 
letter recently received from Davis- 
Harrison-Simmons, of Los Angeles, 
the Club's advertising agency: 

KYW fias shattered every 
single record of productivity 
ever establisfied by any radio 
station we fiave used to date, 
anywhere in tfie United States 
. . has hammered the cost per 
inquiry down to the lowest 
figure yet obtained. KYW is 
a must for this agency for all 
clients wishing to sell the 
Philadelphia market. 

To Mr. Don L. Davis, thanks 
for the kind words. W^e're sure 
that the KYW personality can be 
equally effective for other adver- 
tisers. See our Sales Department, 
or NBC Spot Sales, for costs and 
availabilities on K^A\\ Philadel- 
phia's 50,000-watt INBC affiliate. 




JANUARY 1948 



WESTINGHOUSE 
RADIO STATIONS INC 

WBZ • WBZA • KDKA 
WOWO • KEX • KYW 

National Representatives. N BC Spot Sales — Except (or KEX. 
For KEX, Free & Peters 

61 



siped and unsigned 



f^"' '% 



BpxutAc^ PeAAxuui^ GUa^u^e^ 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Innls HninilioUl 
John \\ . Hurftard 

John li. Ilk-ks Jr. 
Thomas II. Lane 
Norman M. Markwt'll 
Don Mc.\iiliffe 
R. I). .Stoddard 
Roy \. Vemslrom 



The Coa.sl Maiiazini'. puhlishi-r. ed 
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. LouisvilK-. 
asst adv mgr 

Koxall Druft Co, L. .\.. sis prom, adv dir 

.\IU'n B. DuMont Labs. Inc. N. Y., sis prom mis 

Russell P. Ostrander, L. ,\. 

K(iO, S. F., audience prom 

Gerber, Portland 



Morris Plan Co of Calif., pub rel. adv mfir 
Same, adv mftr 

'I'ex-O-Kan Klour Mills Co. Dallas, adv mftr 

.Same, vp in chge nail, retail adv 

.Same, sis prom, adv dir 

<.olumbia .\pparel .Stores. .S. F.. H'wood.. adv mftr 

California Klectric .Supply Co. S. F"., adv. sis prom nigr 

Pacific Power & Light Co, Portland. Ore., adv m(y 



Adue^UlUfu^ A(fe<nc4f PeMxuutel QUatiXfe^ 



NAME 



Raymond .S. .\aron 
John L. Albright 

Fernando (;. Arango 
James .S. Heard 
Pierre H. Keullac 
Lee Blair 
\. \V. Brandon 
David C. Chopin 
VVilf Clement 
Ted Colby 
Paul Corbell 
Douglas Coulter 
Laurence IHincalfe 
L. Brooks Elms 
Hugh Krnst Jr. 
\ictor Fabian 
Kdward L. Fertel 
James F. Hannah 
Louis M. Hayward 
Joseph 11. Healy 
Kdna Bronson Herr 
Cal Kuhl 

Mickey Lane 
Howard F. Locliric 

Lindsay Macllarrie 
Fzrah Mcintosh 
Richard Mcholls 
<;erard II. .Slattery 
<;ilbert J. .Supple 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Benjamin Kshleman, Phila. 
Dancer- F'ltzgorald -.Sample. N. 

depts 
Trans-World, N. Y. 



Y., radio, copy 



Buchanan, ,S. F., acct exec 

VV.SAV, .Savannah, asst mgr 

KWK. -St. Louis 

CHl'M. Toronto, salesman 

KHIM. Eureka. Calif., prog dir 

Radio Program Pniducers. Montreal 

Foote. Cone & Belding. .V. Y.. radio dir 

Ronalds. MontTijal 

(Jeyer. Newell & (Janger. N. Y.. acct exec 

Raymond Morgiin. H'wood.. producer 

War Assets .\dministration. Chi. 

N. W. Ayer. N. Y.. radio dept 
Ru.sscll Birdwell. .N. Y.. radio dir 
Romer, Wash.. I). C., radio dir 
Abbott Kimball. N. Y'., acct exec 
Ward Wheelock, H'wood.. Campbell Soup Club I.S 
producer 

General Foods Corp (Birds Eye-.Snider div). N. Y., 

adv. prom mgr 
Young & Rubicam. N. Y.. We the People producer 
J. Walter 'Thompson. H'wood., radio dept 
WLW, Cinci.. asst gen mgr in chge prodn 

-Morselnternati) iial. .N. Y. 



Soils .S. (jintor. Phila.. IN head 
National Export. N. Y., copy chief 

National Export. N. Y.. radio dir 

O'Brien. Vancouver, radio div dir 

Walsh. Montreal, acct exec in chge French language adv 

Same, vp 

Nachman-Rhodes. .\ugusta. radio dir 

Kelly. Zahmdt & Kelly. St. Louis, radio dir 

Rutland. 'Toronto, radio acct exec 

General. H'wood.. radio acct exec 

Spitzer & Mills. Montreal, radio dir 

Same, vp 

O'Brien . Vancouver, copy chief 

Ruthrauff &'Ryan, N. "S .. radio acct exec 

Grant. H'wood.. acct exec 

C. Wendel Muench. (;hl., media dir 

Harvel Watch Co, N. Y., adv mgr 

Same, vp 

Emil Mogul. N. Y.. radio. TV dir 

Art .\ds. Wash., radio. TV dir 

Bronson Herr .\dvertising .Agency (new). .N. \ .. head 

J. Walter Thompson. H'wood.. vp 

Rodgers & Brown. .N. Y.. radio dir, exec In chge fashion accis 
Same, mkting. mkt research, adv, sis prom dir 

.Same, radio dept supvsr 

.Same, N, Y.. radio dept. exec capacity 

Gcare-Marston, N. Y., radio dir 

James \. .Silin. Boston, radio. TV dir 

Badger. Browning & Hersey. N. Y.. radi<i copywriter 



e 

■ 



J\le4ja /l<feH>cif, /^p/pxUnt^fte^ii^, 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT tor service) 



AGENCy 



I'arnswort li Television & Radio Corp. Fort Wayne 

(Wltillan Brothers Inc, L. A 

(golden Brand Food Products (io, Phila 

(iolden .Nugget .Sweets Ltd, S. F 

House of Hawick. N. Y 

Jewish War Veterans 

Langendorf T'niied Bakeries (Holsum Bread div), S. F. 

Louis Milan! Foods Inc. L. A 

Mirrolike Mfg Co. .N. Y 

Morgan Furniture Co. Asheville, N. C 

Mutual Benefit Health & Accident Assn, Oinaha . . . 

I'rincess Eve Prciducts Corp, N. Y 

Radio 'Television .Supply Co, L. A 

Sardik Food Products Corp, N. Y' 

.Schuize *c Burch Biscuit Co, Chi 

Southwest Food Products Co, Long Beach. Calif. . 

Standard Brands. N. Y 

Sunset Venetian Blind Co. Oakland 

Swift & Co. Chi 

Traubee Products Inc, N, V 

Irav-ler Radio C<irp, Chi 

\\estinghouse Electric Intl. Co, N. Y. 

Uilson Bros. Chi 

^ankee Doodle Root Beer. L. A 

\ our h-Kisi Products. Chi 



JASL .\R\ l9tS 



Radio. TN sets 

Rad ios 

Food products 

. Big Hunk candy . 

. Men's toiletries 

.Institutional 

. Bakery products 

. Food products 

.Furniture polish, floor wax 

Masterpiece Furniture 

. Insurance 

.Cosmetic accessories 

Radio. TV supplies 

.Food products 

Bakery products 

Dude Ranch preserves, jams, apple 
butler 

ShefTord Cheese 

\ enetian blinds 

Prem 

.'Time-Saver Pressure Cookers 

Radi<is. phonographs 

Domestic electrical appliances 

Men's wear 

Root beer 

(Cosmetics. 



Warwick & I.egler. N. \ . 

,\d -Associates. L. .\. 

Al Paul Lefton, Phila. 

(k)nnor, .S. F. 

Funt-(;<ilding, N. Y. 

Walter Kaner. N. Y. 

Honig-Cooper. .S. F. 

Smith. Bull & McCreerv. H'wood. 

Kiiplan *, Bruck. N. Y. 

Burnlev Weaver, .\sheville 

RuthraufT A: Ryan. Chi. 

Capka & Kennedv. H'wood.. for nati ad\ 

Harry J. Wendland. L. A. 

Julian .Scott. N. Y. 

(Gordon Best, Chi. 

Brisacher. Van Norden. L. \.' 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-.Sample. N. Y. 

C. H. MacDonald. S. F. 

McCann-Erickson, Chi. 

Ray-Hirsch. .N. Y. 

J. T. C;rossIey. L. K.. for So. Calif.. .Ariz. 

Fuller «; Smith & Ross. .N. Y. 

BBi;*.<). Chi. 

(irani . H'wood. 

.Schoenfeld. Iluber & <;rcen. ("hi. 




^DON MITCHELL, BILL HICKOK,^ 
LOCK WOOD DOTY, AND BEN 
GUNN IS SHO' MAKING A 
BIG NOISE IN OUR NECK 
OF DE WOODS 




/^YASSUH ! AND ALL DESE 
ATLANTA BUSINESS MENS 

S SHO'BUYIN' DE TIME 




Drawing by A. B. Frost from 
"UNCLE REMUS: His Songs and 
His Sayings" by Joel Chandler 
Harris, which first appeared in 
THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION 
in 1879. Copyright 1908, 1921, 
by Esther La Rosa Harris. By per- 
mission of D. Appleton-Century 
Company, publisher. 



THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION STATION 
5000 WATTS 550 KC 

National Representatives HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



JANUARY 1948 



63 




I 

■ 
I 



Hit Tunes for January 

(On Records) 

A GIRL THAT I REMEMBER cbm» 

Ttx Bentke— Vie. SO-8497 . Vietof Lomb«rdo— M»j. 7S69 
Tommy Tuck«p — Col. 37941 

AS SWEET AS YOU C^esenO 

Art Lund— MGM 10078 . Freddy Sltwart— Cap. 479 
Bill Millner— United Artist* 

FOOL THAT I AM hi I.Ranse^ 

Dinih Shore— Col. 37952 . Sammy Kaye— Vic. S0-S601 
Billy Ecksline— MGM 10097 . Erskine Hawkins— Vic. S0-!470 
Dinsh Wash ngton — Merc. 8050 . Gladys Palmef — Miracle 104 
Georgia Gibbs—Maj. 12013 . Brooks Brothers — Dec. 48049 

FORGIVING YOU (MeiM 

Harry James— Col. 37588 . Johnny Johnston— MGM 10076 
Sammy Kaye — Vic. 20-2434 , Jerry Cooper — Diamond 2084 

HILLS OF COLORADO London) 

Guy Lombardo— Dec. 241 79 . Robert Scott— Mercury 3069 

LErS BE SWEETHEARTS AGAIN cca.pbe.i Porsie) 

Margaret Whiting— Cap. 15010 . Victor Lombardo— Mai. 7269 
Blue Barron— MGM 10121 . Shep Fields— Musicift 525 
Guy Lombardo-Monica Lewis — Dec* , Bill Johnson — Vic. 20-2591 
Billy Leach— Merc* 

MADE FOR EACH OTHER (Pe.) 

Buddy Clark-Xavier Cugal — Col. 37939 . Monica Lcwis-Sig. 1 5105 

Enric Madrigucra — Nat. 9028 . Machito— Cont. 9003 . Rene Cabel — Dec. 50006 

Dick Farney— Mai-7273 . DesI Arnai— 20-2550 

Maris Lina Landin— Vic. 70-7345 . Ethel Smith-Bob Eberly— Dec. 24272 

MY RANCHO RIO GRANDE (Harwall Citeion) 

JaekSmith— Cap. 473 . Shep Fields— Musicraft 522 . Dick Jurgens— Col. 38027 

Ken Carson — Variety* . Victor Lombi do — Maj.* 

Esquire Trio — United Artist 1 1 4 . Murphy Sisters — Apollo* 

THEREIL BE SOME CHANGES MADE (Mar o 

Dinah Shore — Col. 37263 . Peggy Lee — Cap. 1 5001 , Ted Weems — Dec. 2528~8 

EddieCondon— Dec. 18041 . Fats Waller— Vic. 20-2216 

Ambrose Haley — Merc. 6067 . Jimmy Dorsey — MGM* 

Vaughn Monroe— Vic. 20-2607 . Cindy Wslker- United Artis 903 

WHY DOES IT HAVE TO RAIN ON SUNDAY John. one) 

Freddy Mirtin— Vic. 20-2557 , Snooky Lanson- Merc. 5082 
Mill Herth Trio— Dec* Beale St.Boys- MGM* 



ZU-BI 



(Republic) 



Sammy Kaye— Vic. 20-2420 . Victor Lombardo— Maj. 7S63 
Tommy Tucker — Col * , Art Mooney — MGM* 



• Sooit to he releiised. 













'km 



BROADCAST MUSIC INC. 

580 FIFTH AVENUE . NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 
NBW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



64 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS: 

((Mutinueii from page 60) 

caster's own censor, in every control rtwrn. 
The television broadcasters should 
tackle this question now. As a producer, 
I have already— quite unintentionally— 
mildly offended certain segments of the 
public in one instance, simply because the 
cinsor in charge was untrained, inexperi- 
enced, and inept, and my own judgment 
betrayed me; and I know other producers 
who have had the same experience. While 
the director must be responsible for the 
major portion of his own censorship in the 
selection and preparation of his material, 
he will be wise to welcome, even to de- 
mand, a censorship with the power to 
enforce — and hence to protect. Now is 
the time for the television industry to ex- 
plore the question of a central authority 
as against self-censorship, and to define as 
I clearl)' and categorically as possible what 
is in good taste and what isn't. 

Dave Lewis 
Television director 
Cm pies Co., N. Y. 

The broadcast- 
ing code now 
under considera- 
tion by the NAB 
is the answer 
offered b> one seg- 
ment of the radio 
industry to the 
rising tide of pub- 
lic criticism of 
radio broadcast- 
ing. Most criticism of radio falls into one 
I of two categories: commercials are too 
frequent and /or too long; too man>' radio 
programs fail to live up to the generally- 
, accepted standards of good taste. 
I Let us consider these two problems 
separately-. 

In radio broadcasting the commercial is 
the price the audience pays for the 
pleasure of the program. The unwritten 
agreement between sponsor and listener 
runs like this: "I, the sponsor, foot the 
bill for the show \ou're enjoying and in 
return you, the listener, must permit me 
to talk a bit about my product." 

As a rule the listener is agreeable. 

Occasionall\ he isn't. In that case he 

I writes a tough letter to the station, or 

I throws a shoe at the radio, or dials to 

I WNYC. 

I Most radio commercials, at best, are 

tolerated. Some sponsors claim their 

' commercials produce a lot of enthusiastic 

j fan mail. Well, before joining DuMont I 

was in radio for ten >ears. During that 

I time I knew of only a few programs 

1 Please turn to page 66) 

SPONSOR 




OUR TOP RATING 

mea4t4\n\( top sales 



Of the top-rated ten daytime network programs*, WOAI 
broadcasts six. 

WOAI's average listening audience for these six pro- 
grams is 40^'f higher than the national average. 

This is but one instance of WOAI's superiority. WOAI 
delivers more listeners in its daytime primary area than live 
in Washington, D. C. or Baltimore or Cleveland. It covers a 
territory with more retail sales than Pittsburgh or Milw aukee. 
It sells to more people buying general merchandise than 
live in Indianapolis, Cincinnati or Memphis. 

You can check by any standard — WOAI is the powerful 
advertising influence of the Southwest. 



*Hooper, for November 












^BC . SOOOO WATrs . CL£A, CHANNEL . TQ* 

\:S " 



Represented by EDWARD RETRY & CO., INC. - New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Detroit. St. Louis, San Francisco, Atlanta. Boston 



JANUARY 1948 65 



I 



YOU MAY FLY AROUND THE 
WORLD IN 73 HOURS^ 





YOU CAN'T HOP 

INTO WESTERN MICHIGAN 

FROM ANY OUTSIDE POINT! 



If y«ni made an aerial reeoiinaissanee over Weslerii Miehifian, 
you Mouldn'l see any obsta<'le tn keep "outside" ra<lio stations 
really out of this bifi area. Believe us, though, there is a wall of 
fading that very effeetively euts off good local reception of even 
the most powerfid outside stations. 

But Western Michiganders do get perfect reception from their 
two top-notch CBS outlets right in their own area — \^'KZO in 
Kaiama/oo an<l \\ JKK in (irantl Rapids. These two staticnis have 
an outstanding reronl a 10.7% greater morning Share-of- 
Audience, for instance, than all the combined stations of any 
other one network I (Hooper Report for Spring, 1947.) 

That's only one of several things you should know about W KZO- 
^JEF. You'll be interested in the others too. Write us for 
complete facts, or ask Avery-Knotlcl, Inc. 



* Hill Odom flew around the uorld in 73 hours .) miniitrs, in August, 1947. 




WJEF 

^A^tm GRAND RAPIDS 



' a 



AND KENT COUNTY 



1^^ 



-^^U^ °'^*'" AND OPEBATIO ^^ ^X^ 



^'^OADCASTINC 

AVERY-KNODEL, INC., EXCLUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS: 

(Continued from page 64) 

which made their commercials interesting 
to the listeners. I read a lot of letters 
from radio listeners and you could just 
about count the fan letters for commer- 
cials on the fingers of one hand. I seri' 
ously doubt if many radio listeners have 
ever said: "Be quiet, will you! Can't you 
see I'm listening to a commercial?" 

In television the situation can be quite 
different. Commercials may be as inter- 
esting as, or even more interesting than, the 
program. Television commercials need 
not be something the audience has to 
choke down; they may be so good the 
audience looks forward to them. 

For instance, fashion commercials, with 
the proper sets and direction, can have the 
viewers applauding. And how-to-do com- 
mercials can be done so well that they 
will be thoroughly enjoyed by the audi- 
ence and remembered long after the pro- 
gram is forgotten. 

It all boils down to this: if television 
I commercials can sustain interest, there is 
no reason to apply restrictive time limits 
I to them as to radio commercials. 

I The second problem, that of keeping 
I programs within the bounds of good taste, 

is apt to prove a tougher nut in television 

than in radio. 

Radio can offend its listeners with 
words, and only words. These are fairly 
I easy to control. But television can 
offend with words, sets, costumes, ges- 
tures, and mannerisms. The problem of 
control is much more difficult. 

For example, the lines given to an actor 
may be innocuous. But if, when he 
speaks them, he elects to place his thumb 
to his nose and wiggle his fingers, a lot of 
people aren't going to like it. 

Just what rules can be devised to insure 
against giving offense to viewers, quite 
frankly, I don't know. Furthermore, I 
suspect no one else knows. Eventually, 
largely through trial and error, we shall 
evolve a code of good taste. In the mean- 
time, we must depend on the good judg- 
ment of our producers, directors, writers, 
and actors. So far they've done pretty 
well. 

John McNeil 

Manager of commercial operations 

DuMont TV Network, New York 



66 



SPONSOR 




SX42 



Model SX-42 offers the greatest continuous fre- 
quency coverage of any communications re- 
ceiver , . . from 540 kc to 110 Mc. Combines in 
one superbly engineerecf unit a topflight VHf 
and FM receiver, standard and short wove 
broadcast receiver and high fidelity phono- 
graph amplifier. With six bonds; bond six 
covers from 55 to 110 Mc. 





/*Sf 



I 



1 



B, 







SM 



^ 



Model SX-43 offers continuous coverage from 
540 kc to 55 Mc and has on additional bond 
from 88 to 108 Mc. AM reception is provided 
on all bands, CW on the four lower bonds and 
FM on frequencies above 44 Mc. In the band 
of 44 to 55 Mc, wide bond FM, or narrow bond 
AM (just right for narrow band reception) is 
provided. Here is an extraordinarily versatile, 
sensitive receiver at o price that will attract 
all discriminating FM listeners. 



$16950 



'Y EXPERIENCE and accumplishinent. Hallicrafters can claim 
to be among the first and the foremost in FM advancement. More than six 
years ago Hallicrafters had develo{>ed very high frequenc\ equipment 
capable of operation on the new FM bands c>f 88 to 108 Mc. The new Models 
SX-42 and SX-43. direct outgrowths of this pioneering continue to maintain 
Hallicrafters foremost position in this specialized field. FM engineers, tech- 
nicians and all concerned with the progress of FM are invited to listen to 
these models, for a demonstration of a new, high quality in FM reception. 





BUILDERS OF 



(Xft'^^ AVIATION RADIOTELEPHONE 

1947 



hallicrafters radio 

THE HALLICIAFTERS CO., MANUFACTURIRS OF RADIO 
AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, CHICAGO 1«, U. S. A. 



JANUARY 1948 



67 



BUILD OR BUY 

{Continued from (jafic 50) 

did more than all its other advertising to 
give a "new l<x)k" to this great chemical 
and munitions organization. The Bayer 
Albion of Fomiliar Music built by Frank 
Hummert for Sterling Drug hasn't set the 
world on Hre but it has built itself into the 
hearts of those who love those old familiar 
strains and they buy a great deal of 
aspirin. 

The advocates of building programs 
point to the amazing success of Fibber 
McGee and Molly (sponsor, January 



1947) as a case in p)oint. Not one adver- 
tiser in a thousand would have had the 
patience of the S. C. Johnson wax organi- 
zation nor the faith of Jack Louis (Need- 
ham, Louis & Brorby, Johnson's 
ad-agency) in the vehicle. It is true, how- 
ever, that one impcjrtant factor has 
changed since the "building" days of 
Fibber McGee and Molly. The initial cost 
of producing Fibber was less than the 
lowest price of a nighttime dramatic pro- 
gram today. The NBC network cost was 
a fraction of what it is today. Fibber 
McGee and Molly grew up with radio. 
Diapers are always cheaper to buy than 



OMLAHOMA 




i 
I 
w 
■ 



Tulsa's only exclusive radio cen- 
ter. Only CBS outlet in the rich 
"Money M^fcet" section of pros- 
perous Oklahoma. Write KTUL, 
Boulder oh the Park, Tulsa, Okla. 



W 
^ 



m 



Ah-- 






m 



%i' 



Sf ^^ ^^rrs 






m 



JOHN ESAU 

Vice-Pres ond Gen. Mqr. 



AVERY-KNODEL, Inc. 

Notionol Representatives 



long pants. 

There is a postscript to the Fibber 
McGee and Molly saga. Although it was 
a sponsor-owned package to start and 
through a great deal of its air history, it 
now belongs to Don Quinn who writes it 
and the Jordans who play Fibber and 
Molly. Advocates of buying as against 
building point out that any program built 
around comedy or other stars actually 
doesn't belong to a sponst^r or anyone but 
the stars. Human bondage went out with 
the era of Abraham Lincoln, these pack- 
age producers claim. 

That doesn't mean that sponsors can't 
I build and own programs; it does place the 
problem in its proper perspective. Cer- 
tain t>pes of programs can be built and 
I owned by the advertisers ; with other types 
I ownership is not economical and in the 
long run is a delusion ownership in name 
only, not in fact. 

The programs that can be built are the 
vehicles which do not depend upon a 
single star name. They may be star 
vehicles like the Lux Radio Theater or 
audience participation shows like County 
Fair. They may even depend upon 
masters of ceremonies like Cecil B. 
DeMille, just as long as they build a p)er- 
sonality and a following of their own. 

One thing is certain, building a program 
does not insure a lower<ost vehicle than 
buying a package. Cavalcade of America 
costs du Pont $7,500 while many a dra- 
matic package can be bought for $5,000 or 
less. Inner SaiKtum, a Hi Brown produc- 
tion, is an example. On a Hooperating 
basis, SaiKtum might be judged a better 
buy since its current rating (December 1) 
is 13.4 and Cavalcade on the same day and 
hour rates only an 8.3. But regardless of 
the cost Inner Sanctum couldn't do the 
Cavalcade job for du Pont. One of the 
virtues of building a program is that every 
aspect of the show can do a public rela- 
tions job for the advertiser. With a 
package (generally speaking) only the 
commercials do the selling. 

Identification of an advertiser with a 
program makes the vehicle automatically 
do part of the promotional job. This is 
another plus factor in sponsors' building 
and owning their own programs. Sponsor 
identification means something more than 
knowing who the sponsor of a program is 
when a Hooper interviewer calls a home 
for a coincidental check-up. It's one 
thing to know who is sponsoring a pro- 
gram while listening to it and another to 
know who the advertiser is when a pro- 
gram is mentioned at a time when it's not 
on the air. It is this latter form of sponsor 
identification that advertiser-owned- and- 



68 



SPONSOR 




IS STILL THE 



HOTTEST LINE IN THE INDUSTRY 




rlK5T IN rcATURcS Watch shoppers on any 
radio sales floor. What set catches the interest of the crowds? — a Zenith, 
of course! That's because every model in the Zenith line is packed with 
features that actually mean something — features that reflect the design 
and engineering "know-how" developed during Zenith's years in the 
industrj- — features that insure value. 

FIRST IN DEMONSTRABILITY zemh 

radios and radio-phonographs are easy to sell, because their features are 
the kind that you can actually demonstrate. The Cobra Tone Arm, for 
example, permits the most dramatic tone arm demonstration ever made. 
The Zenith "Radiorgan." the Silent-Speed Record Changer, the big, 
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FIRST IN PERFORMANCE Fromheong 
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the knowledge, the pride of achievement that marks this organization. 
The final test of every radio is how it performs . . . and Zeniths are built 
to pass that t«st with flying colors. Hundreds of thousands of well- 
satisfied Zenith owners attest to that. 

ZENITH RADIO CORPORATION 



6001 W. DICKENS AVENUE 
JANUARY 1948 



CHICAGO 39, ILL. 



That's Because of the 

Value - Giving, Sales -Making 

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69 



-s*- 



I 

I 

m 




Find the advertiser who could kick himself. His com- 
petitors caught onto WVET's fast returns before he did. 
Moral: get hep to Rochester's new -«^ ▼ ^ - —-■ ^w^ 
live-wire, up-and-at-'em station now! — ^^ ^ |^ |^ 

BASIC MUTUAL STATION 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

5000 WATTS 1280 KC 

NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY WEED AND COMPANY 



\IAT-,. 




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For Your 
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W AA T — in Eastern Iowa 
brings you a listening audience 
with almost twice the per 
capita wealth of the rest of 
the U.S.A. 

And, lowan income is almost 
evenly divided: half from 
smokestacks, half from 
cornstalks. 

So whatever your product . . . 
get your rriessage on WMT 
and 

get MORE SALES for your 
advertisiufi dollar ! 

Ask the Katz man for details. 



■VCC*!*.. 



■^■vac. 



1 .1^^»>a^^«;TV^ 






]JJ^- 



WMT 



\|\ V, 



n 



CIDAR RAPIDS 



Th* Station Built By Loyal LIit«n*r- 
ship . . . Now In Its 25th Y««rl 



BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 
5000 wattt 600 k. c. Day end Night 



produced shows develop. 

Another factor which retards great 
manufacturing organizations from build- 
ing their own programs is the matter of 
staffs with radio advertising backgrounds. 
With the exception of Sterling Drug, 
Lever Brothers, Procter and Gamble, 
Campbell Soup, General Foods, General 
Mills, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, Liggett- 
Mycrs, Miles Laboratories, and American 
F^ome Products, advertisers generally do 
not have enough programs on the air to 
set up a production staff or even a real 
supervisory staff. Even American To- 
bacco doesn't have a special radio adver- 
tising division despite the fortune it 
sjDends on the air. 

In some cases advertising agencies have 
assumed the problem of building pro- 
grams for their clients. The advertisers 
in many of these cases own the program 
just as definitely as if they had conceived 
and nurtured the idea themselves. In 
other cases the sponsor owns his program 
while he remains with the agency, al- 
though even where the agency owns a 
program produced for an advertiser it has 
been known to surrender its rights when 
an account has moved. 

Networks have within the past year 
resumed producing programs for 
sale to sponsors. The leader in this 
trend is CBS, which has not only pro- 
duced and built audiences for programs 
but has sold them to Lipton's Tea and 
Swan Soap (both Lever Brothers prod- 
ucts), Chesterfield, and Listerine (Lam- 
bert), it has sales in the offing for a 
number of other Columbia-built pack- 
ages. A problem with network-built pro- 
grams is that they are tied to the web that 
produces them and very seldom can be 
moved. If the time comes that a sponsor 
feels that he has obtained the maximum 
value from a show on one network and 
wants to switch to another chain, with a 
partially-different audience, the network 
answer is usually "no. " In a few cases 
advertisers have been able to achieve 
partial control over a network-built pro- 
gram if they present it for a long enough 
period on the air. Evcrsharp's contract 
for Henry Morgan is supposed to have 
contained a clause that if they sponsored 
him on ABC for a period of three years or 
more the\' could move the program at 
will. This was the only way that Ever- 
sharp would have bought Morgan. Since 
Eversharp has not renewed the fall 1947 
contract this clause will of course not 
come into effect. 

The networks as show-developers have 
something that no other segment of the 
industry can have the ability to put the 
programs on the air and develop follow- 



70 



SPONSOR 



PUBLICLY ACCLAIMED! 



For Outstanding Performance 



KAGH 



PASADENA, CALIF. 



# The greatest civic show ever staged by a radio station in the Los Angeles area 
was recently witnessed by thousands oF spectators who Filled the magnificent Pasa- 
dena Civic Auditorium and overflowed outdoors. Entertained by great names of 
stage, screen and radio, listeners in the Pasadena-Los Angeles area were treated 
to a five-hour radio show unmatched in the annals of West Coast broadcasting. 

# This brilliant performance proved that FM broadcasting and reception can pro- 
vide the finest in public entertainment. It stimulated interest in FM and resulted 
in an unprecedented public demand for FM sets. Four thousand visitors reviewed a 
special display of FM receivers set up in the Gold Room of the Civic Auditorium. 

# The impact of KAGH's "Grand Opening" was literally felt around the world. 
Special salutes were received from Great Britain, Ireland, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, 
Poland, New Zealand, France, Sweden, Australia, Czechoslovakia and others. These 
salutes are being converted into Sunday evening programs which are being volun- 
tarily featured by foreign language newspapers in the KAGH great metropolitan 
market. 

# KAGH is equipped to do an equally effective job for its advertisers. Its signal 
covers an area with a population of 3,500,000 and an effective buying power of 
$5,660,384,0001 

# Let KAGH show what top programming in a top market can do to help sell your 
product. 



KAGH 

CHANNEL 252 • IN THE MIDDLE OF THE DIAL • 98.3 mc 



ANDREW G. HALEY, Owner, ROSE BOWL BROADCASTERS, 30 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 
JANUARY 1948 71 



I 

I 



ings for them before they are offered for 
sale. It's true that both ABC and MBS 
will work with indepi'ndent package show 
producers and pay them sustaining rates 
while these programs are being built. 
That is how Qiiccn for a Day, Heart's 
Desire, Juvciule Jury, Leave It to the 
Girls, and Twenty Questions, for example, 
were developed on Mutual. It's the way 
that The Fat Man, Ladies Be Seated, 
Bride and Groom, and W'i7/jt' Piper were 
built on ABC. When an independent 
producer builds a network show he, for 
the most part, agrees that the program 
will stay on that network. So as far as 
the sponsor is concerned the program 



might just as well be web-built. 

Agencies are moving more and more in 
the direction of buying independent or 
network-built programs. It costs them 
less to ride herd and they can tell each 
client just the audience he will have from 
the first broadcast, which they cannot do 
with an especially built production. 

Since most advertisers buy programs in 
a hurry and want results in a hurry - 
buying programs has the vote of most 
agencies and sponsors. There'll always be 
some sponsors and their agencies who 
don't have to worry about their pro- 
grams' producing immediate sales. For 
these, building their own vehicles will in 



the end pay extra dividends 
sales and in listener good-will. 



both in 



Talk About Program Promotion ! 



BUS CARDS 

DEALER LETTERS 

DIRECT MAIL 

NEWS STORIES 

NEWSPAPER ADS 

PROGRAM LISTINGS 

^f ROGRAM SPOTS 

5TUDIO DISPLAYS 

^THEATER TRAILER 



«5ir| 





5000 WATTS 

960 KILOCYCLES 
COLUMBIA NETWORK 



People in the Soutli Bend market 
are continually reminded that Vi SBT 
brings them tKe top radio shows. 
Whatever W SBT promotes — one 
jirogram or a series, one listening 
period or an entire day— it does so 
consistently and effectively. Promo- 
tion like this gives WSBT advertis- 
ers a decided advantage in this area. 



FM MARKET 

(Continued from page 33) 

Porilantl. Ore 



12.000 



San Franiiiito 



WashinttlMii 



K(;W-FM 

KPF.M 

KPR,\ 

K.\LW 

KGO-F.M 

KJBS-FM 

KRON 

K..SFH 

W.\SH 

WINX-FM 

WRC-FM 

\vwik;-fm 



It will be seen that the number of re- 
ceivers in an area has little to do with the 
area and practically nothing to do with 
the number of stations operating in the 
territory. Set distribution and consumer 
purchase of FM receivers depends upon 
the energy of the station manager his 
belief in FM and the vigor of his fight 
for it. 

Despite the number of stations in a big 
city, one station operator's complaint can 
sum up the big-city FM problem. He 
laments that when he talks FM to people 
they ask him whether he can get them a 
television receiver. Away from the big 
cities, where the station operator has a 
tight little market, FM thrives. 

By the first of February over 1 , 100 sta- 
tions will have been authorized b> the 
Commission; 80 of these were already 
licensed by December 1, the balance of 
those authorized at that time (956) either 
holding conditional grants or construction 
permits. All the stations that have been 
authorized must be completed in eight 
months but it's a certainty that many of 
the 1,100 will receive extensions of the 
eight-month period since the manufactur- 
ing capacity of the industry is nowhere 
near capable of producing the number of 
transmitters required to equip the sta- 
tions authorized. Inability to obtain 
equipment is usuall>' an acceptable reason 
for granting an extension. 

Facilities and available audiences on a 
national basis will be a reality in 194S. 
The problem of establishing a nationwide 
I FM network is being worked upon since it 
j appears that Petrillo has no intention of 
relenting on his decision that on FM sta- 
tions AM network programs will not b>e 
permitted, if they have music. The only 
out for network programing, at the 
I present writing, is an FM chain. This 
i last is likely to be very difficult to manage 
since, as indicated repeatedly in sponsor, 
the musicians' union under Petrillo is 



PAUL 



RAYMER CO. 



NATIONAL 



REPRESENTATIVE 



*Sels eslimalfd as of Frbruary 1. 



72 



SPONSOR 



«eiibeT 




A 



this is tlie symbol 
of your protection 



The FM ASSOCIATION is the Only Organiza- 
tion in the United States Devoted Exchisively 
to . . . 

• Protecting Your Investment in FM 

• Unity of Action in Promoting FM 

• Encouraging Greater FM Set Production 

• Greater Public Demand for More FM Sets 

• Serving as Your Intermediary with the FCC, 
Government Agencies, and Other Organiza- 
tions on the Continuing Over-all Problems 
Affecting FM Operations 



Your Membership In the FMA Assures You of 
Participation in All These Benefits. For Further 
Information Address Inquiries to: 



FM ASSOCIATION 

101 Munsey BIdg. • Bill Bailey, Executive Director • Washington 4, D. C. 

JANUARY 1948 73 



■ » , ! 'rr^r ^ m 



I 



SELL 



OUT OF 



CITY FOLKS IN THE 



SOUTH'S No. 1 STATE 



WITHIN OUR 



Primary+Area 



• WINSTON-SALEM 

» GREENSBORO 

• HIGH POINT 

2.5 MV/M 

MEASURED 
SIGNAL 



210,200 PERSONS 

$179,469,000 in Retail Sales 
$283,685,000 in Buying Income 

We Lead Day and Night 
in This Big Tri-City Market 

Write for our BMB DATA FOLDER 



^ WINSTON-SALEM ^ 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



NBC 

ArnuATC 

National Raprasantativa 
HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



committed to the practice that no new 
network operation is to be permitted to 
serve stations that do not have contracts 
with AFM locals. Even this hurdle will 
be overcome before January 1949. Every 
obstacle in the b(x)k has been thrown in 
the way of FM, yet it's still the expecta- 
tion of the Federal Communications Com- 
mission that FM, except in rural areas, 
will supplant AM. 

FM rate cards are still a tough problem 
and many station operators admit that 
they still don't know how to charge. It's 
a simple matter for a standard station 
operator whose station rate card is high 
enough for extra services to be absorbed; 
he can just duplicate on his FM station 
his nonmusical AM commercial programs 

for free. 

Present rate cards (the few in use) are 
based upon area covered and number of 
sets in use. The plan of a number of sta- 
tion operators is to follow the TV routine 
and have a sliding scale based upon the 
number of receivers in their area. There'll 
be a charge "per thousand sets" which 
will build up to the rate that the station 
•feels is fair. There it will stop. 

Since FM users naturally are buying 
FM audiences that seems the fairest thing 
to do — in 1948, the year FM as a national 
medium comes of age. 



SELLING THE SUPPLIERS 

(Continued from page 34) 
50 per cent of all livestock in the Midwest. 
They also sell a sizable part of the feed 
which is used in raising the beef, lamb, 
and pork. Thus the packers do business 
with the farmers as both sellers and 
buyers. No one likes to be caught going 
and coming. There always comes a time 
for the livestock farmer when the cost of 
feed is high and the price of meat on the 
hoof is low. Then the big packers are on 
the spot — when supplier relations, unless 
bolstered by a long-term good-will cam- 
paign, sink to a new low. 

Such a good-will campaign has been the 
backbone of Wilson Company's broad- 
casts over WMT, Cedar Rapids, since 
1944, and more recently over KATE, 
Albert Lea, Minnesota, and KGLO, 
Mason City, Iowa. Ninety-eight per cent 
of Iowa's farms have radios. These re- 
ceivers are used for entertainment but 
many installations were made as insur- 
ance against being caught by bad weather 
conditions or selling livestock in a bad 
market. Since the farmer must listen for 
weather and market information, Wilson's 
decided to use the market and weather 
broadcasts to educate the breeders on 
how to raise more meat from each bushel 
of grain. In Iowa SO per cent of farm in- 





FIRST 



in the 



QUAD 



The 40th retail market 

DAVENPORT 
ROCK ISLAND 
M L I N [ 
EAST M L I N E 



^I^^B 




"The FIRST station West 
(actually North) of the 
Mississippi." 




woe 



WOC'FM 



5,000 Watts, M20 Ke. 
BASIC NBC Affiliate 
1. J. Palmer, Pres. 

Boryl Lottridge, Mgr. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA 

Notional Representatives: 
FREE & PETERS, Inc. 



74 



SPONSOR 






YOU PA YS YOUR MONEY. . . 
AND YOU TAKES YOUR CHOICE! 



1 City: Memphis, Tenn.— Calls: 31,149 — Months: October-November, 1947 


TIME 


Sets 
in use 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 




FM & 
Others 


jkday morning 
V»n. thru Fri. 
:00 A.M.- 
2:00 Noon 


16.2 


7.3 


16.8 


24.7 


18.3 


20.5 




12.4 


K:day afternoon 
If n. thru Fri. 
: 00 Noon— 
,:00 P.M. 


19.1 


10.7 


18.0 


32.1 


11.3 


18.3 




9.6 


Evening 
ia. thru Sat. 
(00 P.M.— 

0:00 P.M. 


29.1 


11.0 


11.7 


35.0 


14.5 


27.4 




0.4 



ftOO 



,?t»" 



'st.-<s 



x>- 



City: Memphis, Tenn.— Calls: 24,964— November 9 thru 15th, 1947 


TIME 


Sets 
in use 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


FM& 
Others 


8:00 A.M.— Noon 


17.9 


13.4 


14.4 


17.3 


21.5 


18.5 


12.8 


2.1 


Noon 6:00 P.M. 


18.4 


14.2 


15.8 


27.5 


12.7 


15.3 


11.5 


3.0 


6:00 P.M. 
10:30 P.M. 


32.2 


10.8 


10.1 


36.2 


16.5 


25.7 




.7 



Buying Time Based Solely On A Conlan 

Or A Hooper Is Like Buying A Piece Of 

Merchandise Based Only On The Price Tag 

. 5 o. .He S Me.ph. s.aUons -^-|^- J:/:-:^. 
5 „, ,he 6 Memphis statons subscribed 






ASK YOUR FAVORITE MEMPHIS STATION FOR DETAILS 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^2^11^^^^^ 



come is from the sale of livestock or their 
products. More and better iivestoci< 
means prosperity for the farmers and the 
packinjj industry. 

Farmers are naturally suspicious of 
"help" offered by packers. Wilson's 
knew that it had a long-term job aiiead if 
it was to make any impression on its 
sources of supply. Its farm program 
started as a three-time-a-week effort at 
12:30 p.m. At the outset it combined 
entertainment, Tom Owen's Cowboys, 
three to five minutes of farm weather, the 
Wilson farm market trends, the day's im- 



portant farm news, and every so often an 
interview with a successful farmer. 

About a year ago, it was decided to 
change the program format, drop the 
entertainment, and cut each broadcast to 
10 minutes. The Wilson broadcast ncrfi 
follows the noonday news daily instead of 
three times a week. The shortened 
period enables the listener to get his im- 
portant information quickly. There's a 
market report on every broadcast aired by 
Morris Christy, Wilson's Livestock Serv- 
ice Director in Cedar Rapids. Christy 
gets his information direct from buyers at 




ller<'\s .>^till aiiotlicr 
reason why our audience 
. . . The First Families 
of Agriculture . . . have 
so much money to spend. 
First, they sell their 
hogs at a staggering 
price (l)()ught any y>ork 
lately?). Second, the} 
make a t\\o-wav profit 
by k<M'ping enough for 
their own meat supply. 
Throughout Kansas and adjoining states, these farm families 
have a long-estahlished habit. They turn their dials to \\ IBW 
when they get up and leave them there until they go to bed . . . 
listening to and acting upon our frieiidh buxiug recomnu'iida- 
tions. If you can deliver the goods . . . \\ IHW cau ah\avs 
deliver the Kansas bu\ers. 




50rving fh» 

First Families of Agriculture /i'*^^^AS, 



Rep.: CAPPER PUBLICATIONS, Inc 



CBS 



BEN lUDY 

G^n Mgr. 

WIBWKCKN 



the yards and frequently mentions each 
day's shippers by name. He comments on 
the condition of the shipment and how 
the stock has been handled. 

Friday's broadcast is in the form of a 
weekend review and once a month the 
program is visited by Harry Palmer, man- 
ager of the Wilson plant in Iowa, who 
gives the farmers a trend summar\' for the 
month. Palmer has earned a lot of 
respect for his judgment and producers 
value his analysis of the meat situation. 

There are no commercials as such on 
the program. Wilson does not urge 
farmers to sell their stock to Wilson, al- 
though records indicate that better and 
more livestock are offered to Wilson 
buyers automatically. This is true in 
WMT's service area as well as the terri- 
tory served by KATE and KGLO. On 
the latter two stations Wilson's sponsor a 
Swuiay Wilson Hour at 1 p.m. This pro- 
gram like the original WMT Wilson farm 
service broadcasts combines entertain- 
ment and information. It runs a half 
hour and the information doesn't crowd 
the 30 minutes. On KATE, Wilson's have 
a daily market report of five minutes, 
10:55- 1 1 :00 a.m. This is handled by Bill 
Lawson, a former County Agent, who has 
the market conditions at his fingertips and 
gives it to the farmers direct — without 
dressing. 

The result of these broadcasts is an 
acceptance for Wilson's that's rated far 
better than that of any of the other "big 
four" packers. Figures of increase in live- 
stock purchases do not mean anything at 
this time. Conditions are so abnormal 
that there is no comparable base. How- 
ever, one thing is certain, Wilson's is 
damned less by the farmer than any other 
packer drawing upon Iowa farmstock. Its 
farm service broadcasts are credited as 
the reason. They've made Wilson's Iowa 
operations seem like those of a local firm. 

Most researchers agree today that both 
wholesalers as well as retailers have a dual 
problem. They have to sell the merchan- 
dise the\- purchase. The\' have to sell the 
men and organizations from whom they 
purchase the goods for resale. Radio can 
handle this dual assignment but those who 
fashion its programs must keep in mind at 
all times that the programs have a dual ob- 
jective—to sell supplier and consumer. 

Broadcasting is fundamentally local. 
It can turn a great corporation into a 
group of individuals. It can go a long 
way toward easing the natural suspicion 
that exists where the buyer is big and the 
seller is small. It can rub the shine off 
the "big city slicker." Ultimately that 
can be a help for all concerned- the 
buyer, the seller, and the public. 



76 



SPONSOR 



It's Survey Time 



{lufia^A qet that 4th dwcif^?) 



From time to time, throughout 1947, SPONSOR called 



attention to three surveys bearing on the 



effectiveness and readability of advertising 



trade publications among radio-nninded agencies and advertisers. 



In each, as the year rolled on, SPONSOR 



showed progressively better. But KMBC, Free & Peters, and WJW 
made their studies between January and April, 1947 . . . 
while SPONSOR was in its infancy. It's January 1948 now, 
and survey time is here again. So who's got 



that 4th survey? 



' Bcarly 1 00 stations, in addition to networl<s, transcription firms 

d others in the dollars-and-cents end of broadcast advertising, 

■ »e conlraeted to use space in SPONSOR regularly in 1948. 



SPONSOR 



For Buyers of Broadcast Advertising 







I 




FREE <S- PETERS, Inc., N.Hon*! R*pr«tcntativ»$ 



BeautiFul Hair contest pulls 700 entries 
in Bill Hcrs<jii-WRC (Washington, D. C.) 
promotion. Winner received a weekend 
in New York at the Waldorf and many 
extras. The 700 would-be beauties had to 
be jud}»cd personally at WRC studios. 
Judges included women editors from 
Washington Daily News, Post, TimeS' 
Herald, Evening Star, and WRC's Nancy 
Osgood. 

Conversational newscasting plugged by Oak' 
land's KLX to replace the barker type of 
news handling. With a good catch'line, 
"Person to Person," and a $1,000 prize 
contest, all KLX's newscasts (IS a day) 
are being promoted as being handled in a 
"straight-forward, friendly, informative 
style." 

Charlotte's Mayor Baxter promotes WBT's 
Night Mayor Kurt Webster. The station isn't 
permitting the "night mayor" idea to 
languish. Baxter presented Webster with 
a birthday cake on the 365th broadcast 
and all the newspapers covered the event. 

Mystery Car promotes WJBK's "Take a Good 
Look." While the program is on the air 
an automobile with appropriate signs 
tours some section of Detroit. The first 
person seeing the car and calling the 
studio during the broadcast and repeating 
the message (word for word) of the sign 
on the car wins a glamor evening for four 
on the station, including flowers, theater 
tickets, dinner, etc. Sponsor is local 
Ford dealer. 

Crusading pays for Erskinc Johnson, uiio 
spearheaded the campaign to keep the 
story of Al Capone off the screen. Over 
1,000,000 protests were received b>' John- 
son, who asked for them. Word of 
mouth about the Johnson MBS program 
is said to have been tremendous during 
this November-December campaign. 

News bulletins for menus are used by Min- 
neapolis' WCCO to promote its Ccdric 
Adam^ News. Dining rooms at Nicollet 
Hotel, Radisson Hotel, and Minneapolis 
Athletic Club all carry the mimeographed 
' last-minute news bulletins which are 
rushed from WCCO to the spots in time 
to be clipped to luncheon menus. 

All shoppers in stores at time stores' names 
are broadcast receive food gift in Scran- 
ton's WSCR-Banner Stores promotion 
I Sponsor is association of independent 



stores. Program is Tommy Dorsey's 
disk jockey show. All the 1 50 members 
are required to have a radio in their 
stores and have it tuned to WSCR. The 
program does not replace newspaper space 
but makes it more effective. 

Dick Haymes helps needy (amilies in Salvation 
Army-Christmas tie-up. in over 130 cities 
during the Haymes Auto-Lite broadcast 
on December 25, the local Salvation 
Army commander was cut into the pro- 
gram for two and a half minutes to give 
a local family presents paid for b>- 
Haymes and the Auto-Lite Company. It 
localized, for all the 1 30 areas, the 
Haymes program and gave it a Christmas 
slant that few other ideas could have. 

Tulsa merchants cooperate with KVOO 
in Mid-Continent Petroleum football con- 
test. Each of 1 1 merchants featured in 
his window a blow-up of one of the leading 
players on the Tulsa University's Golden 
{Please turn to page 81) 



SPEARHEADING . 
THE PROGRESS J 




CVe/fCTT L.DILLMKD 
6CN. Mon 



l5l9-F-STneCT, NW 



78 



SPONSOR 






BENRUS 

(Couiinued from page 3/) 

Royal Dutch, Colonial, and National — 
all put the stamp of accuracy on the 
Benrus line. The time signals became 
something more than billhoarding, they 
became actual bring-'em-in vehicles. 

Benrus isn't the only watchmaker 
which has tied itself to airlines. Practi- 
cally all of the nation's leading makers of 
timepieces are the "official" watches of 
one airline or another. However, Benrus 
has gone a step further than the others; it 
has tied up the airlines' promotion at the 
point of sale, bought rights for Benrus to 
become the official watch of airports, with 
big Benrus clocks adorning the key loca- 
tions at ports like the Chicago Municipal 
Airport and Washington's National Air- 
port. These important deals were publi- 
cized via Benrus time signals each time 
they were contracted. Clocks in jewelers' 
shops in the Chicago area carry the news 
as do displays and clocks in the nation's 
capital. Since accuracy continues to be 
the number one reason for buying a par- 
ticular watch this emphasis on airline and 
airport use of Benrus gives sales a great 
lift. As a matter of fact Benrus pounds 
the airline tie-up so hard that other watch 
companies which use their airline tie-ups 
contribute to Benrus sales. Most of 
Benrus copy in dealer tie-in advertising 
emphasizes the "official watch of famous 
airlines" appeal. Counter displays, wall 
cards, in fact every display piece promot- 
ing the general Benrus line, screams 
"airlines." 

Benrus doesn't stop with using time 
signals to sell their accuracy; Benrus 
watches are used by airline pilots, etc. 
Every once in a while Benrus takes over 
some of its time signals to sell a particular 
item in their line. In 1946 they concen- 
trated their advertising attack on "Em- 
braceable," which was a watch and a 
bracelet in one. Ella Raines was "elected" 
Miss Embraceable. She appeared on 
radio programs in New York, flew to the 
Windy City and appeared on programs 
there, and then to the Coast where she 
also made personal appearances on sta- 
tions. All this was done in one da\ to 
ernphasize Benrus' being the watch that 
times the airlines. Unlike other watch- 
makers, Benrus didn't attempt to sell a 
number of models in their campaign but 
concentrated on Embraceable. The> had 
planned to sell 35,000 of this numbei . In 
fact that was all the works that were 
manufactured. The promotion ran a 
month. Benrus salesmen delivered to the 
home office orders totalling 60,000 pieces 
before the month was over and although 



0)Si 




\ I 




PIE'S A STAR IN 
ANY LEAGUE! 

Baseball's immortal Pie Traynor has been a glittering 
KQV sports star for over two years. Pie's greatness 
goes right on, in his nightly sport chats and through 
Pie's numerous and inspiring speeches. KQV stars are 
continually building this same sort of good will, which 
passes right along to KQV advertisers as a big bonus 
in listener preference and response! 



PITTSBURGH'S AGGRESSIVE 
RADIO STATION 

Basic Mutual Network • Natl. Reps. WEED & CO. 




Chattanooga, Tennessee 

-NBC- 

The 1150 kw spot on your dial 
In the heart of Tennessee Valley 



HEADLEY-REED COMPANY, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



JANUARY 1948 



79 



3.5 Billion $ $ 

IN THE ST. LOUIS MARKET 

SALES RESULTS ... de- 
livered by KXLW . . . will 
place you in the St. Louis 
Area dl some of the lowest 
rates available in any major 
market. 

KXLW 

ST. LOUIS' fAVORITE 
NEWS & MUSIC STATION 



DELIVERS the rich Midwest 
market of St. Louis and 79 sur- 
rounding counties with a total 
population of 4,148,326. 

DELIVERS a loyal audience of 
1,117,540 radio families who 
wrote more than 56,000 fan 
letters in the first ten months 
of 1947. 

DELIVERS your message with 
more than a dozen local stars 
on St. Louis County's only local 
station. 

DELIVERS an area of 49,739 
square miles faithfully blanketed 
by the 1,000 watt non-direc- 
tional signal of KXLW. 

DELIVERS sales results for you 
at some of the lowest rates 
available in any major market. 



CALL - WRITE - WIRE 

FO R J O E 



Radio's Newest Prosremming 
On Radio's Newest Medium 
On The Ail . . . January 1 , 1 948 



l< X I w-f 



m 



instructions went out to stop selling 
Iimbraceable, sales totaled 100,000 before i 
the stop order could be made effective. | 
Now it's almost as tough to get one of 
these watches as it is to (ind an apartment. 

The current emphasis is being placed on 
a new number called Endurable a man's 
watch that can be dropped, thrown, or 
stepped on without losing a second. 
Shockproof watches are nothing new but 
these don't look the part, they're just as I 
thin and as trim as a fine wrist watch. 
Benrus will have sports figures in all fields 
endorse the Endurable. "If it'll stand up 
in tough athletic competition it'll stand 
up anywhere" -that's the general idea. 
Time signals will be given by noted sports 
authorities just as they were given during 
a special Dud in the Sun tie-up by the 
stars of that picture. The picture itself: 
was kicked around by the critics but that 
didn't lessen the impact of Benrus time 
signals broadcast by Jennifer Jones, 
Gregory Peck, Walter Huston, Herbert 
Marshall, Joseph Gotten, and Lionel 
Barrymore over a two-month period. 
Each star recorded round-the-clock sig- 
nals and they were rotated on each sta- 
tion. The airline appeal was still there 
but glamour was added — at no cost to | 
Benrus. 

This is typical of Benrus time-signals 
operations under ad-manager Planter, 
who is convinced that air advertising by 
itself doesn't sell. What does turn those 
air dollars into sales dollars is promotion. 
With adequate promotion, air advertising 
can make a sponsor. Split-second accu- 
racy is just a phrase unless it's put to 
work. Benrus makes it work by drama- 
tizing it with their airline tie-ups and 
point-of-sale implementing of the air time 
signals. The airline tie-up by itself would 
be futile unless broadcast. The broad- 
casts would be unproductive if they 
weren't brought to the point of sale and 
sold to the retailer. It's this Tinkers-to- 
Evers-to-Ghance double play that is re- 
sponsible for Benrus' selling over $20,000,- 
000 in watches (wholesale figure) each 
year. This means that advertising costs 
Benrus five cents on the dollar. 

In a number of areas where Bulova has 
had the market tied up, Benrus has had 
to resort from time to time to using news- 
casts and once or twice sportscasts to get 
its story across. Each time the substitute 
for time signals did a good job for them 
until worth-while station breaks opened 
up. Also it provided a change of pace for 
Planter for no one becomes tired of one 
form of advertising more quickly than the 
man who creates it. No doubt it was 
these away-from-the-standard-watch-sell- 
ing-formula programs that inspired him 




WE'RE 
COCKY 

. . . about the 
percentage of 
yearly renewals 
— nearly perfect! 



WIP 



BASIC 
MUTUAL 



PHILADELPHIA'S PIONEER VOICE 



Represenfed nationally 
by EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



IT'S THE 



THAT 
MAKES A STATION GREAT! 



Jm 



MONROE, LOUISIANA 

HAS MORE 
LISTENERS 

in Northeastern Louisiana 
Than All Other Stations 



Combin^l^l 

AFFILIATED W^^ 



AMERICAN BROADCASTING CO. 

REPIESENTEO IT 

TAYLOR-HOWE-SNOWDEN 



80 



SPONSOR 



to create jingles for jewelers which run 
from 10 to 60 seconds. With these 
Planter went all out for talent, using 
name singing groups from the Kate Smith 
songsters to the Landt Trio. In addition 
to these recorded jingles, Benrus furnishes 
jewelers with continuity and a Jewelers 
Radio Continuity File which contains 
everything but the repair bench. No 
matter what the holiday or occasion a 
Benrus jeweler has continuity available to 
enable him to use broadcast advertising 
effectively. There isn't an overdose of 
Benrus in the script continuity or jingling 
and 439 jewelers use the jingles over 510 
stations because they're top'drawer radio 
and effective selling. Planter points out 
that no matter who says "a beautiful 
Benrus watch that's guaranteed for accu- 
racy," it's Benrus advertising. 

Benrus has no cooperative advertising 
allowance. In fact only one watchmaker, 
Gruen, is said to share advertising costs, 
paying 50 per cent of the cost of dealers' 
advertising of Gruen watches up to 3 per 
cent of dealers' purchases. Most com- 
panies do what Benrus does, furnish their 
dealers with advertising mats. 

The broadcasting industry has been 
looking askance for the past year at the 
growth of give-away programs and the 
pending NAB Standards of Practice will 
hit this trend since the mention of the 
trade name of a give-away will count 
against the total commercial time. How- 
ever, Benrus is prepared for this. It 
doesn't expect much Benrus mention 
when Sammy Kaye or Kate Smith or any 
other program gives away a Benrus. They 
spend $25,000 a year for this type of pro- 
motion and then through promotion take 
over the program. Sammy Kaye's pic- 
ture presenting a Benrus to his So You 
Want to Lead a Band winner adorns post- 
cards which are sent out by jewelers all 
over the nation. Especially does this 
postcard routine go into high when Kaye 
visits a town and presents his audience 
participation program from the local the- 
ater. Selected jewelers in the town get 
the postcards in quantity and send them 
to all their current prospects. 

No matter who sponsors the program, 
for the jeweler and his customers it's 
Benrus's. Some of these tie-ups have just 
happened, others have been bought 
through "brokers" who make a business 
out of furnishing programs with gifts. 
(This is where Benrus' $25,000 is spent.) 

There's one fundamental point in 
Planter's Benrus air-advertising philoso- 
phy — anything broadcast is promotable 
and will sell watches — so why not pro- 
mote it. 

Benrus does. 



BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 

{ContiyMied from page 78) 

Hurricane team. Pootball fans (between 
10 and 18 years of age) had to go to each 
of the 1 1 windows to see the blow-up in 
order to identify the players. Location of 
windows and clues to footballers' identi- 
ties were broadcast each day for 1 1 days. 
It was a regular sports treasure hunt. 

Most awards by American Schools and Col- 
leses Association 30 to sponsored programs. 
The winner in the audience participation 
group was Truth or Consequences; in the 
children's group, Juvenile Jury; in the 



diiiniatic group, Theatre Guild oj the Air; 
in mysteries, CMunterspy; and in quiz 
shows. Professor Quiz. Sponsored shows 
that tcxjk second honors were Greatest 
Story Ever Told and .Metropolitan Opera. 

Sample with recipe (or women broadcasters. 
In order to obtain better acceptance for 
their recipe and women's news releases 
which are distributed regularly to broad- 
casters, Kenyon & Eckhardt sent out 
with their Christmas candy recipe a 
sample wrapped as a Christmas gift. The 
recipe naturally included a Kellogg prod- 
uct. Rice Krispies. K&E handles radio 
for Kellogg. 




ven 



tu.aiiuy 



WHY NOT NOW!* 



There'll come a time when you, too, will start 
usins WHHM — the station that delivers MORE 

LISTENERS PER DOLLAR IN MEMPHIS. 



We base this fact on the knowledse that more 
and more national time buyers are joinins the 
scores of local advertisers using the result-full 
station known as WHHM, 



Results Ring the Cash Register 

Results Bring More Renewals 

Q. E. D.: WHHM keeps company with the Best 

Ask the Forjoe & Co. man for availabilities and 

start checking sales in Memphis. 



LPATT McDonald, seneral manaser 
FORJOE & CO., representatives 



WHHM 

Independent — But Not Aloof 

Memphis, Tennessee 



* GOLD MEDAL FLOUR DESERVES A COMPLIMENT ON THIS ONE^ 



JANUARY 194« 



81 



. . WHERE 



99 MILLION 
PEOPLE 
GATHER 



E\ERY WEEK 



I 
I 



Major a(l\('rti^('i> know there are rnorc customers 
todciy ill all |)ail> ol llic coiiiilrv llian i-\rv before. 
They rmi-t reach a- many ol tlieiii a- ihey can 

— or conipitilion will -ell llie market- t/icy mi>? 

Rill with toilav- ri-iiip co<t of doing hiisiness, 
lliev mii-l reach iho-c cii-tomer- a.l a 
compcfitii rl\ ci oiioinicdl "co-l-pei-thoiisaiur' 

— they lant afloid lo let competitic.n 
hiiN I ii-loiiici- lor le-- than llicy ilo. 

The fact- -liou that the two to|) I .S. network^: 

(I not oiiK (leiixcr l(ir<i<'.st (ntdicncos 

ill all part- ol the coimlrv; 

/) lull al-o (lcli\ cr ihcm at a ■'co-t-per-lhon-and" 

coiisislcntly louci than llie other luo network-. 

And llic cold .11 idimctic dcmon-trate- that 
in till- uoiknig relalion-lii|) hetweeii sizi- ami cost 
ol andiemc- (iifiKillv thlnci rd lo i.dvcrtisors . . . 
CBS i> the mo-t eilecli\e ol ALL the netwoik>. 



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ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

"Best Test City in New York and 
the Middle Atlantic States" Says 
Sales Management 1947 Test City 
Survey. 

STATION WHEC 

"Best Listened To Station in Roch- 
ester, Both Day and Night" Say 
Hooperatings (and has been for 
the past 4 years!) 




*And you gef comp/efe cooperation from WHEC's 
Program, Commercial and Promotion Departments 
on your campaign! 






N. Y. 
5,000 WATTS 



National Representatives: J. P. McKINNEY & SON, New York, Chicago, San Francisco 



JANUARY 1948 



87 



QofdiruufdoL TUdwohL 

INTCRNATIONAt BUILOINO 1319 F STRCCT N . W. 

WASHINQTON 4. D. C. 



AN OPEN LETTER TO ALL FM BROADCASTERS: 

Continental Network has been in operation since March 26, 1947 and now has 
a total of 32 FM Stations participating by use of 573 miles of 8000 cycle 
telephone circuits and over 1700 miles of radio relay paths. Continental 
has effectively demonstrated in this eight month period the flexibility and 
practicality of regional network broadcasting using the principle of rebroad- 
casting programs from one FM Station to another. 

This system of regional broadcasting has tremendous potentials. Good receiving 
equipment is now readily available, and a carefully engineered FM relay system 
can extend the range of reliable radio relay service beyond the normally ex- 
pected service range of the station whose signal is to be rebroadcast. If the 
FCC approves a proposal now before it, requesting an allocation for special low- 
band FM stations for relay purposes only, the possibilities of FM networking 
on a national basis will be imminent. 

The technical superiority of FM broadcasting system has gone far beyond specula- 
tion — it is a proven fact. The FM broadcaster must now concentrate on pro- 
gramming which will take advantage of this superiority to build a great demand 
for FM receivers and thus create listening audiences in his area. Competitive 
programming is essential to attract advertising support. 

The FM radio relay system offers the opportunity to arrange with other FM 
Stations in the area for an exchange of outstanding programs — to form a 
regional network operation. The high cost of intermittent use of intercity 
wire circuits for regional networking has been a barrier to regional 
networking for years. Radio relay reduces this expense to a minimum and 
is the only means available today for networking FM broadcasts with full 
fidelity on an intercity basis. 

Continental Network recommends the establishment of networking operations 
by radio relay as the best available system of quality programming on a 
regional basis and the greatest device for the rapid promotion of FM 
broadcasting. 

When full advantage is taken of the superior characteristics of FM broad- 
casting, public acceptance and enthusiasm is tremendous and the FM 
broadcaster is quick to feel assured of its inevitable success. 

Sincerely, 
For: CONTINENTAL (FM) NETWORK 



By 



^^g ^//0!££V 



Everett L. Dillard 
General Manager. WASH-FM 



88 SPONSOR 



Mtt^iMM 




* * * TV has entered the phase of direct 
mail proof of viewing. Gulf Oil recently 
(December I J) made an offer of a free 
drawing pencil to viewers of their You 
Are an Artist WNBT telecast. The audi- 
ence had to send in a drawing in order to 
obtain the pencil, since Jon Gnagy, artist 
•on the program, teaches viewers how to 
draw. 

Eight hundred and eighty-seven draw- 
ings were received in response to the one 
offer. Of these 562 came from adults and 
325 from children. 

On DuMont's WABD, an offer of small 
mirrors with built-in flashlights in return 
for comments on the initial scanning of 
Mary Kay and Johnny was made by the 
sponsor, Jay Jay Dress Company. Joseph 
Jessel, Jay Jay president, expected 200 
comments, provided for 400, just in case. 
Actual count was 8,061 which had J. J. 
jumping to obtain the mirrors. 

* * * The first major area where there 
aite facilities for a TV network but no sta- 



tion to air the programs is Boston. No 
one in the Bean City expected the AT&T 
relay system to be working so soon. 

The result of TV network availability 
in Boston is that there will be a great deal 
of advance promotion before WBZ-TV 
hits the air. Programs are being repro- 
duced without a transmitter* (off the 
line) in special promotional deals. TV 
receivers were set up at WBZ for the 
Louis-Walcott fight and the place was 
mobbed despite the fact that only 100 
prominent Bostonians were invited. 

Department stores in the Hub area are 
having special showings of television pro- 
grams (also off the line) and receivers are 
being sold in anticipation of WBZ-TV's 
going on the air. There'll be a ready- 
made audience waiting for visual broad- 
casting in Boston. 

* * * While AT&T's relay stations are 
located only 10 miles apart, KTLA in 
Los Angeles recently proved that jumps 
of ^6 milesf or more are possible. In pre- 
senting the inauguration of a 65,000-kw 
steam turbine by the Los Angeles Depart- 
ment of Water and Power, KTLA beamed 
the signal direct (sans land lines) via a 
relay atop the steam plant to the KTLA 
transmitter on the top of Mt. Wilson 36 
air-miles away. The program was seen 
with ideal clarity on all receivers in the 
L. A. area when telecast from the Mt. 
Wilson transmitter. 



* * * Orders have gone out to the New 
York Daily News' columnists to make 
certain that they have television news in 
their pillars with regularity. In one 
issue Danton Walker, Frank Sullivan, and 
Ben Gross all included TV items in their 
assignments. This will continue even 
after the Daily News station goes on the 
air. An initial result is an increase in con- 
sumer interest in visual broadcasting 
since the News' Broadway and radio 
columns are well followed by its several 
million readers. 

* * * Video receivers will be installed in 
Philadelphia's Commercial Museum for 
the viewing of the Democratic and Re- 
publican conventions. Facilities will per- 
mit the gatherings to be seen by over 
15,000 people. Television set manufac- 
turers will handle the installation and 
servicing, feeling that the conventions can 
do more to achieve TV recognition than 
any other device. 

* * * Geyer, Newell & Ganger is the 
third New York advertising agency to 
make its own survey of the effectiveness 
of video. The result of the survey is that 
the agency is recommending the medium 
to all its clients and expects to land a 
number of new accounts because of its 
TV commercial know-how. 



*Signal is amplified and fed direct lo TV reeeiveri from 

the telephone lines. 

\ While line-of-sight is usually 50 mites TV signals are 

seldom good enough lo re-transmit after they travel this 

distance. 




Zenith Radio, in its plea that the 44-50 
mc channel be assigned to FM exclusively, 
introduced proof that FM travels far 



beyond its so-called line-of-sight (50 
miles) service area. WATG in Ashland, 
Ohio, was heard by Zenith in Chicago, 300 
miles away. Stations around 250 miles 
from Chicago (WEW, St. Louis, Mo., 
WMIX, Mt. Vernon, 111., WELD, Colum- 
bus, Ohio) were heard with regularity. 
* * * Biggest time-buy yet reported for 
FM or any other form of broadcasting is 
the December purchase by Sanger De- 
partment Store and Philco Radio Corpor- 
ation of nine hours daily, from 10 p.m. 



to 7 a.m. Buy was over KIXL-FM 
(Dallas), Lee Segal's station. ♦ ♦ ♦ Big 
drive will be initiated to program several 
non-urban FM stations for the farmers in 
their territory. Farmers have thus far 
been slowest of any group to accept FM 
and intense drive to convert them is 
planned by KFRM-FM and other sta- 
tions in markets that are fundamentally 
rural. * * * One basic objective of the 
Frequency Modulation Association is a 
national FM network. 




Commercial facsimile operations will 
start in Philadelphia this month and 
within the next six months in Oklahoma 



City, Chicago, and San Francisco. The 
New York Times and the New York Daily 
News are conducting experimental FAX 
transmitting. The Times is expected to 
be the first in New York with this service, 
since it owns WQXR and WQXQ, both 
of which have been working with Radio 
Inventions (Hogan organization) in ex- 
perimenting with the delivery into the 
home of printed matter via the air. 
* * * RCA will not hold back its 
Ultrafax to give priority to TV as 



rumored. The Camden organization's 
feeling is that both can grow at the same 
time, since Ultrafax works on a TV 
principle. * * * FAX's integrated com- 
mercials will very likely take the form of 
comic strips with advertising in the strips 
themselves. Big newspaper syndicates 
are worried about what they call this de- 
basement of the comic strip despite the 
fact that the use of comic strip advertising 
in newspapers hasn't hurt the regular 
strips' appeal. 



JANUARY 1948 



89 



In OMAHA 

and Council Blurfs 

53? 



OF THE 



Morning Audience 

(8:00 A. M— 12:00 Noon) 

GOES TO 

KOIL 

BASIC ABC-5000 WATTS 

* Oct. -Nov. Hooper Listening Index 

We're Proud of Our 

Afternoons & Ei'eni'ngs, Too! 



Represented by Retry 



THE KAY LORRAINE SHOW 

53 transcribed musical /i hours 
with special Christmas program 




Announcer, Frank Gallup 

"Songbird Kay Lorraine is scheduled (or the 
bijjesl sal build-up since Dinah Shore" 

—WALTER WINCHELL 

"Kiy Lorraine is the greatest modern song- 
stiejs" — QUENTIN REYNOLDS 



Wrilr . 



Wirr 



I'lu, 



Jlwc%^ S, Qaadman 

RADIO PRODUCTIONS 



19 East S3rd St. 



New Yorlc, N. Y 



40 WEST 52nd 

(Continual from pafic 14) 
tisers using produced musical programs, 
Morris Plan started sponsorship of 
Mi(.siai//y Yours in September of 1946. 
This program, 6:30 to 7:00 p.m., seven 
nights weekly, was contracted on a 52 
week basis and was carefully programed 
with familiar melodies of genuine wide 
appeal. Transient popular and extreme 
classical music was avoided in favor of the 
music that everyone knows and enjoys. 
The program clicked immediately. Favor- 
able public reaction was prompt and satis- 
fying, so several months later, in June 
1947, when the adjacent half hour became 
available, Morris Plan extended the pro- 
gram for a whole hour, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., 
seven nights a week. 

There has never been a deviation from 
the format of familiar melodic music; 
commercial copy has been confined to 
their thrift accounts, always been held to 
a minimum, and handled in a very 
friendly but dignified manner. 

Results? There is no question but 
what the program has produced, for, at 
the end of the first year when he signed 
the 52-week renewal, Mr. F. A. Collman, 
Sr., president of Morris Plan Company, 
gave us the story: more than $3,500,000 
in new thrift accounts were opened during 
the year and 90 per cent of them were 
traceable to this KSFO program. Music- 
ally Yours. 

Our experience with this particular 
account cannot be construed as a panacea 
for all ailments experienced by financial 
advertisers, but we believe the formula is 
sound and will produce results. Simple, 
inexpensive, dignified, but well scripted 
and built on a foundation of genuine wide 
appeal, such a program will attract an 
audience, and if the commercials are 
written well and simply, that audience 
will respond. 

We enjoy the articles in sponsor and 
look forward to each issue. 

John G. Campbell 
Sales Manager, KSFO 
San Francisco 

SOFT DRINK LEADERSHIP 

(Continued from page 29) 
"best by taste test" appeal, are divided 
equally between one-minute transcrip- 
tions and 1 5-second station breaks. The\ 
are of three types. First there is the 
recreated movie-star endorsement that 
ties in with Royal Crown Cola's magazine 
and newspapcT advertising. The second 
spot series features "gives you not one, 
but two full glasses in every bottle," 
together with a pick-up appeal, or as 
Ro\al Crown characterizes it. a "quick- 



A GREAT 

Southern Market 

Population 



Combined: 1,000,000 
Urban only: 131,000 



Johnson City 
Kin$sport. . 
Bristol 

Elizabethton 
Greeneville 
Erwin 



34,000 
33,000 
30,000 
20,000 
8,000 
6,000 



t^= Industry 



Plastics 

Textiles 

Bookbindins 

Hardwood flooring 

Hosiery 

Rayon 

Siikmills 

Furniture 

Foundries 

And many others 



Agriculture 



Tobacco: 100,000,000 

pounds sold annually 
Beans: World's largest market 
Dairy 
Poultry 
Livestock 



t^^ Tourists 



Heart of TVA recreation 
area. Gateway to Great 
Smoky Mountains 

Wealth 

Highest income bracket 

group in South 
Richest and most thickly 

settled rural communities 

in South 



WJHL is the only full time 


regional 


station serving this area. 


Thirty- 


two BMB counties with 


85,020 


BMB radio homes. WJHL 


is "most 


listened to" in ten of its 


32 BMB 


counties 





John E. Pearson Co., — Reps. 



910Kc 



WJHL 



5000 Wafts 



Johnson City, Tenn. 
ABC Full Time 



90 



SPONSOR 



'^- ^ 



up." The third series are the inventions 
— which when tested prove to be screwy. 
The pay-off in this series is that the test 
that always works is the Royal Crown 
Cola test — proved by 150 motion picture 
stars — "best by test." 

Spots are scheduled three times a week 
by Royal Crown and the local bottler is 
supposed to match this by paying for 
three himself. However, the placement of 
the radio spots by the parent company is 
not contingent upon the bottler's spend- 
ing his own money. In the case of out- 
door advertising the bottler either 
matches Royal Crown's investment dol- 
lar for dollar or else there's no poster 
advertising in his area. 

Royal Crown spent around a half 
million dollars for advertising in 1947 and 
expects to increase this at least 50 per cent 
in 1948. The battle to retain the markets 
in which they lead — markets in the solid 
South and a few on the West Coast — will 
require more advertising and there is 
always the hope at the Nehi home offices 
that they'll obtain national distribution — 
and then they'll return to network adver- 
tising which they tried with Believe It or 
Not Ripley in 1939 and 1940. Ripley 
insisted that the program have a New 
York outlet, and so despite the fact that 
Royal Crown Cola could not be bought in 
New York for love or money, Ripley's 
program was heard over WABC. In New 
York the show carried a special announce- 
ment to the effect that Royal Crown Cola 
hoped the listeners liked the program and 
they were sorry that Royal Crown could 
not be bought in New York. The pro- 
gram brought Nehi some inquiries about 
franchises for the metropolitan New York 
area but not the right one. 

The margin of profit for bottlers of 
trade-marked soft drinks ranges from 
eight to 12 cents a case. It takes a lot of 
cases to make money for a bottler with 
this margin and there's liable to be no 
margin or a minus one when he's pioneer- 
ing a new line. Canada Dry found out 
that adding a 12-ounce cola drink (Spur) 
to its line was okay but despite the fact 
that they had a special promotional line — ■ 
"the dry cola" — they found the product 
moved along the loss-leader way. Ginger 
ale and sparkling water are the profit 
items with Canada Dry. 

Canada Dry was an earl> sponsor of 
Jack ("Nickel-Back") Benny (May 2, 
1932), who kidded the product (Canada 
Dry was one of the first to permit gag 
commercials). It had only ginger ale to 
sell — and the spiced drink is no competi- 
tion to colas or the newer entries in the 
field known as "up drinks." From 
Benny, Canada Dry went (with a hiatus 



of five years) to Information Please and 
for two years the Dan Colenpaul upper- 
bracket quiz started Canada Dry up the 
sales ladder again. Then came another 
year hiatus. In 1941 1942 they used 
Michael Piper, Private Detective on the 
then-titled Blue Network (now ABC) but 
not too successfully. For the next four 
and a half years, Canada Dry used other 
media. It came back to the air with 
Sparkle Time with Meredith Willson in 
1946. The program won awards for doing 
a top original commercial job. However, 
internal troubles plus the fact that it 
wasn't ready to push its cola drink again. 
Spur, forced this program off the air, in 
March of 1947. 

Canada Dry's current assets place it 
second to Coca-Cola among soft drink 
concerns. In financial assets (according 
to Wall Street advices) the top firms rank 
in the following sequence: 



Nchl (Royal Crown) 
Dr. Pepper 



$ i.doo.omi 

$ 2,10(1.000 



Company 
Coca-Cola 
Canada Dry 
Pepsi-Cola 
Hires (root beer) 



Assets (end of 19-Ki) 
$70,600,000 
$I0„?00.000 
$ 8.700.000 
$ 3.000.000 



There are other important firms in the 
soft drink field about which there is less 
financial information available despite the 
fact that they are healthy contenders for 
America's non-alcoholic liquid refresh- 
ment dollar. These include Seven Up 
which is rated by most bottling authori- 
ties as number one among the non-cola 
drinks in the U. S. Seven Up, as the 
name indicates, is in the category of up 
drinks.^ Its advertising budget is in excess 
of $1,275,000 and while its adventures in 
network radio haven't been too successful 
their continuing spot broadcasting has 
helped push 5>even Up business. They 
used Lone Ranker for 1 3 weeks in 1938 and 
very little happened since Seven Up does 
not find its major market among young- 
sters. Seven Up's latest venture into 
chain broadcasting was the MBS Fresh 
Up program which ran for 63 weeks and 
got nowhere with the audience. 

Seven Up is addressing its printed ad- 
vertising to the home and is looking for 




Otis P. Williams 
General Manager 
91-93 Halsey St. 
Newark 2, N. J. 



right 

down 
your 

alley 

WNJR 

Your kingpin outleT in North 
Jersey . . . WNJR! With comp/ete 
North Jersey news, exclusive 
North Jersey coverage, WNJR 
strikes a new high in the rich 
North Jersey morket. If you're 
aiming at these 1,000,000 
homes, WNJR is right down 
your alley! 

5000 Watts 1430 Kilocycles 



the radio station of the 



JANUARY 1948 



91 



THE JOE HERNANDEZ SHOW 



a 3.1 Hooper 

in 
OCTOBER ! 



Nishtly . . . 3,000,000 listeners in 
Southern California, via KMPCI 

1,500,000 listeners in the San 
Francisco bay region, via KYA! 

Mr. Sponsor, or Mr. Account 
Executive, this is the show that 
delivers, six nights each week, 
throughout the year! 

The Joe Hernandez Radio Show, 
featuring Thoroughbred Racing, 
is available for the San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, San Diego, 
Portland and Seattle Markets!! 



The Bloodstock Agency of California 

954 So. La Brea Street 

Los Angeles 36, Calif. 

YORK 0373 



on every dial 

• 

KNOXVILLE'S 

ONLY 
INDEPENDENT 

FORCE 

m 

Knoxville, Tennesee 

Represented by Donald Cookc^ Inc. 



a program that will hit the home audience 
without emphasis on junior. 

In the field of soft drinks, excluding the 
colas and the up drinks, the leader is a 
product with regional distribution. It's 
tops in Texas. It's Dr. Pepper, which is 
supposed to have started at the same time 
that a Dr. Pembcrton launched Coca- 
Cola (1886). Unlike other drinks it is 
said to have a prune base. The Dr. 
Pepper organization wants it sold as a 
food, with "Drink a bite to eat at 10, 2, 
and 4 o'clock." This claim has restrained 
a number of big agencies from bidding for 
the account at one time or another. 

Benton & Bowles handled Dr. Pepper 
from 1940 to 1942 but lost it, partly be- 
cause the board of directors of Dr. Pepper 
discovered that a B&B account executive 
received more (by several thousands) 
than the Dr. P. president. The account 
then returned to Tracy-Locke Company 
of Dallas, Texas, its home area. With 
Tracy-Locke back in the saddle the or- 
ganization returned to the drink-a-bite 
appeal which B&B had dropp)ed. 

Dr. Pepper is presently sold in 40 states 
and will have a spot campaign repeating 
the drink-a-bite-to-eat-at- 10-2-and-4- 
o'clock, time and time again. 

For three and a quarter years Dr. 
Pepper sponsored Darts for Dough on 
ABC but it has been dropped as of 
January 1, 1948. The explanation of 
A. H. Caperton, advertising manager of 
Dr. Pepper is, "We feel that it has served 
its purpose for us." The trade generally 
feels that the program during the \ears it 
has been on the air has delivered as much 
business as it can- for the product. Give- 
away programs in theory reach a con- 
stantly shifting audience but Dr. Pepper's 
bottling organization decided that the 
listeners to Darts for Dough had either 
been "Peppered" into drinking or else 
they never would be. The concentration 
will be on spot broadcasting during 1948 
with a constant repetition of the product 
catch-lne. 

Dr. Pepper actually achieved sales 
higher than Ro>al Crown Cola in 1947 
and competed with it in most of the RC 
markets. It's a closely controlled corpor- 
ation and is noted for its conservative 
handling of its advertising cash. The 
latter, said to have been $1,500,000 in 

1947, is based upon the previous year's 
sales at the rate of 25 cents per gallon of 
syrup. Of this, seven and a half cents are 
spent in radio and will be spent in spot in 

1948. The $1,500,000 advertising of the 
parent company will be surpassed by 
bottler spending since it is a Dr. Pepper 
franchise requirement that each bottler 
spend a minimum of three cents per case 



92 



on advertising. New bottlers. sometimes 
spend as much as $. 16 a case because they 
receive very little advertising assistance 
until they achieve substantial distribu- 
tion. 

Freight and other handling costs have, 
to all practical intents and purposes, 
eliminated the nationally-bottled soft 
drink and sparkling water. Oldest of 
these is White Rock, a carbonated water 
used for years primarily as a mixer. Its 
sprite at the edge of a cliff looking down 
at a spring is supposed to be advertising's 
link with its past. Smart kidding copy 
which has held to the old trade-mark but 
has a laugh with it is being used in 
modem magazines. This is a prelude to 
White Rock's changing its organizational 
format and becoming a parent organiza- 
tion with franchised bottlers all over the 
nation. Thus far its radio efforts have 
been restricted to a sports program 
(Bobby Grayson) in Portland, Oregon, 
over KGW. White Rock's entire appro- 
priation in 1947 was $250,000 but several 
times this amount will be spent, it's 
claimed, in 1948. White Rock will dis- 
tribute not only a sparkling water but a 
cola drink, an up drink, and a full line of 
fruit syrups. There'll be a national spot 
campaign placed by Kenyon & Eckhardt 
but details have yet to be worked out. 
One of the reasons why White Rock is 
being forced to become a multiple-product 
line is because firms like Pepsi-Cola have 
gone into the carbonated water field. This 
market, unlike the regular soft drink field, 
is not an expandable one. The field for 
mixers is limited and when Pepsi started 
aggressivel)' pushing its Evervess with a 
campaign which hit at the "high-priced" 
sparkling waters there was no other out 
but for White Rock to get into the soft 
drink business with both feet. Pepsi's 
Evervess advertising slant, which says, for 
instance, "She pays $50,000 for her mink 
coat but only five cents for her mixer," 
can't be taken with a shrug by White 
Rock. While the mink coat wearer may 
not believe it, the same market that 
bought Pepsi-Cola because of its "Twelve 
full ounces, that's a lot" goes for the 
pseudo class appeal. 

White Rock will not go into the root 
beer field, simply because the making of 
root beer syrup is tougher by far than the 
compounding of any of the other flavors. 
In this field Hires has been a leader for 
years but Dad's Old Fashioned Root Beer 
has been coming along stronger year by 
>car. This growth of Dad's is based 
almost 100 per cent upon a pounding 
jingle. It spent $500,000 for advertising 
in 1946 and about $750,000 in 1947. It's 
even invaded New York and is growing 

SPONSOR 



^- *• ■ . t. v.^i 



each month. Dad's growth has been so 
great that competition is stressing Doc's 
Old Fashioned Root Beer to catch some 
of the Dad's business. Spot gets nearly 
all of Dad's Old Fashioned Root Beer 
advertising dollar and while the product 
is yet to achieve distribution in every 
state it has a toehold in many of them. 
Bottlers featuring Dad's are usually out- 
side the metropolitan areas and unable to 
obtain a major soft drink franchise. 

Root beers for many years were leading 
drinks in the South. Cola advertising 
plus the use of root beer to hide the taste 
of castor oil did things to root beer busi- 
ness and permitted other soft drinks to 
take over. Another reason for the slower 
growth of root beers is that the leader in 
the field, Hires, started bottling the 
product only in 1936. 

In New England, some Mountain 
states, and in Milwaukee, root beer out- 
sells colas. Even in areas like Birming- 
ham, Alabama — where Hires established 
a plant in 1938 — Hires root beer is proving 
a formidable competitor for colas. Hires' 
sales are only 25 per cent less than Dr. 
Pepper's or Royal Crown Cola's. Hires 
tried radio for five months in 1927. It 
returned to the air in January 1944 and 
has been on the air ever since. Although 
it started with a half-hour program it now 
finds that a 15-minute network show on 
CBS hits a good portion of its prospective 
drinkers. Current air spending is at the 
annual rate of $550,000 for time and 
$200,000 for talent. Its advertising bud- 
get for 1948 will be over $1,000,000 and a 
goodly part of it will continue to be spent 
in broadcasting. Hires is the only soft 
drink that also sells a concentrate to the 
public and thousands of homes make 
their own. 

Hires in its home town (Philadelphia) 
also has a line of water coolers, a drinking 
water (Purock), and a club soda. These 
profit from the broadcast which sells the 
firm name but are not actually mentioned. 

Next in appeal to the colas, up drinks. 
and root beers, are the orange drinks. 
The leaders in this field also find that 
broadcasting sells their trade names and 
their appeals. Orange Crush, a midwest 
firm, uses live and recorded spots on 
several hundred stations. The spots are 
placed cooperatively with local Orange 
Crush bottlers and stress the "take home" 
appeal. The latter is what has taken the 
seasonal curse off soft drinks and although 
it was Canada Dry that first plugged the 
all-year-round slant practically all of the 
drinks now keep their schedules running 
continuously. 

Despite the tremendous size of the 
national soft drink field, the trade still 



feels that big local companies do a com- 
bined business that is almost as large as 
that of the combined national parent 
companies. Many local organizations 
have made broadcasting history. Hoff- 
man Beverages, before the firm became 
part of the Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer 
empire, was the first advertiser to prove 
that 1 1 p.m. newscasts were top buys. 
Hoffman was just a Newark, New Jersey, 
bottling company before it started using 
WOR, New York, to tell of its wares. 
Although it competed with long-estab- 
lished New York lines of soft drinks, in 
many sections of metropolitan New York 
it stepped into first place for a while. 
Now the 1 1 p.m. news spot is an estab- 
lished feature and one that's no longer 
considered marginal time for results al- 
though the rates are still marginal on 
most station rate cards. 

Proof of what happens when a drink 
does not keep up with the times is seen in 
two of the soft drink field's one-time 
greats, Moxie and Clicquot Club, the first 
a pick-up drink and the second a class 
ginger ale. Moxie's wooden horse mounted 
on an automobile chassis was beloved of 
children throughout the East and the 
broadcasting of Clicquot Club's Eskimos 
(1927-1936) headed by Harry Resor and 
his banjo were almost as well known as 
Pepsi's nickel jingle. The sound of the 
huskies, the bells on the sleigh, and gen- 
eral feeling of Eskimos, made Clicquot the 
best-recognized trade name in soft drinks. 
Both Moxie and Clicquot Club have per- 
mitted the advertising parade to pass 
them by. 

The soft drink market has expanded 
beyond even the fondest hopes of the 
syrup makers and bottlers of 20 years ago. 
The retail sales of the product in 1947 ex- 
ceeded $1,000,000,000. There were 1,125,- ' 
000 retail outlets for soft drinks and 6,685 
bottlers were serving America as this 
•Issue of SPONSOR went to press. No new 
soft drink has been successfully intro- i 
duced to any market without the aid of 
spot radio. Little new came forth from 
the advertising brains of the industry dur- 
ing 1947 but there's plenty brewing for 
1948. I 

The youth market is the key to which 
firms will forge to the front — and broad- 
casting will put the key in place. Pepsi 
has a number of ideas up its sleeve and 
Coca-Cola has the monej- to spend. The 
more Pepsi, Royal Crown, and Coca-Cola 
spend the more other firms will profit. 

A big point remains — can a non-cola 
drink join the leaders? Seven Up and Dr. 
Pepper think they can. Hires isn't 
talking. 




-0* 

J M** .^ Offices in Chicago 

P^ . ^V^ New York • Detroit 



iV^*^ »j St Louis • Los Angeles 

^^ San Francisco 



>o'- ►<» 




JOHN 
BLAIR 

& COMPANY 



BiPRESENTINC LEADING RADIO STATIONS 



with 

WKAX 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 



1000 Watts 



900 KC. 



Ganus C. Scarboroush 
Gen. Mgr. 



Hal Holman Co. 



New York 



Qiicage 



JANUARY 1948 



93 



Si*ONSOR 




SPEAKS 



Mister Television 

Back in those early war days when the 
subject of television was good for a pro 
and con argument, and stations were with- 
drawing their TV licenses, a man in St. 
Louis was quietly talking the Board of 
Directors of the Post-Dispatch into parting 
with upwards of $1,000,000 for a com- 
pletely equipped television plant. 

George Burbach, general manager of 
KSD, that man, was persuasive. So 
much so that the Post- Dispatch, to 
cement its television order with the 
broadcast equipment division of RCA, 
made a down payment of 10 per cent 
toward the first-postwar-equipped tele- 



vision station in the United States. 
KSD-TV went on the air in 1947 St. 
Louis is fast growing TV conscious. 

George Burbach now extends his in- 
fluence over a broader scene. His enthusi- 
asm and genuine belief for the newest 
medium, his willingness to impart what 
he knows to others, are attracting visitors 
from New York to Seattle. On the day 
that sponsor's representative showed up 
two visitors from Louisville, WAVE'S 
George Norton and Nate Lord, were also 
on hand. A day or so earlier a Toronto 
publisher had flown down to see the KSD 
TV picture. Fifteen or more eager 
seekers of television knowledge flock into 
George Burbach's offices at the Post- 
Dispatch every week, and come away 
with a better understanding and apprecia- 
tion of television. Television needs 
missionaries. George Burbach is doing 
plenty to fill this need in the midwest's. 



Editorializing on the Air 

As many broadcasters are against the 
idea of editorializing on the air by owners 
of broadcast stations as are for it. Spon- 
sors would rather the industry continue 
on a status quo basis; they feel that 
nothing but harm can come from voicing 
opinion on the air that isn't plainly 
labeled as such — and they ask "How is it 
going to be possible to label an editorial 
broadcast as opinion all the way through 
the ailing?" They point to the Orson 
Welles May^ Jrom Mars program which 
was clearly labeled "fiction" and yet 



started a riot that killed simulated news- 
casting as part of radio drama. 

Sp<jnsors do not belittle NAB's Justin 
Miller's fight for freedom of speech on the 
air. It isn't the theory they are worrying 
about, it's the practice. They point to 
the beautiful job that Edward Murrow is 
doing on his Campbell Soup newscasts, 
editorializing but plainly labeling what he 
has to say as "one reporter's opinion." 
He has been forthright on many contro- 
versial subjects. However, he always 
makes it clear when he starts editorializ- 
ing that that's just what he's doing. 

Besides, as one sponsor puts it, how 
many newsmen of Murrow's stature are 
there available for radio's editorializing? 

On local issues, most sponsors are 
agreed that much good can be done 
through editorializing, as WCAU has done 
on the Philadelphia water situation. 
Campaigning for civic virtue can do a 
great deal of good, until the "outs" start 
attacking the "ins" and broadcasters take 
sides. 

Freedom of speech is nothing that this 
publication wants to deride. It wants it 
for itself and for broadcasting. It recog- 
nizes, however, that it's a two-edged 
sword. Advertisers in printed media are 
permitted to say what they think on any 
subject that doesn't offend good taste. 
They feel, a great many of them, that if 
freedom to editorialize is extended to sta- 
tions it should likewise be extended to 
them on the air. 

And most of them would rather that 
the first step be not made. 



r 



Applause 




TOPS IN MEDIA RESEARCH 



Although all radio research is done for profit, of one kind or 
another, it's the best media research ever conceived or carried 
out. While other forms of advertising are content with circu- 
lation figures, rather than readership, broadcasting insists on 
definite facts on not only who is listening but who is listening 
to what — and what the listener actually recalls of the adver- 
tising content of the program. 

Hooper asks, "What is advertised?" Nielsen sends re- 
searchers into each home he checks for a pantry survey to 
discover just what the buying impact of the broadcast pro- 
grams is. Gallup is planning a "controlled town" in which 
programs may be tested in every detail. Diary reports 
(Audience Surveys, Hooper, and a host of others) give audi- 
ence listening patterns. Schwerin and Lazarsfeld-Stanton's 
Analyzer give intimate details of listeners' likes and dislikes- 
Radio spends millions to discover what makes broadcasting 



94 



tick — and most of it, it spends itself without contributions 
from advertisers or agencies. 

If ever there were an ideal representation of the American 
way of life, it's in the research side of broadcasting. There 
isn't a chance of its becoming stale, the competition is too 
fast and furious and survival is only for the fleet of mental fo<it. 

It's the very battle between Hooper's telephone and diary 
survey methods and Nielsen's audimeter that keeps both of 
them on their toes and most of radio buying their services. 

We don't think we're prejudiced in feeling that broadcasting 
itself deserves a deep bow for its researching. It even pays for 
figures that cut it to the quick. Ask any station manager who 
underwrites a Hooper City Report what happens when he 
runs third or fourth in his area. And yet he, in most cases, 
goes right on subscribing and making the facts available. 

That's radio. 

SPONSOR 



'»-»'■ '■»•-- X \r.Z. I 



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Z19L\ 'ON llWUad 

SSVIO ISHU 



nulla 11. -'••" 

\ the way through i^,, air. 



weeKs, 



WLW reaches 81.2% of the ZVa Million Radio Homes 
in this area 




The total impact of The 
Nation's Station within the 
WLW Merchandise- Able Area 
— the exact over-all perform- 
ance of WLW and leading com- 
peting stations — is now 
available through a special re- 
port of the Nielsen Radio In- 
dex, based on four measured 
weeks of listening in February 
and March, 1947. 

As an actual or potential user of 
radio advertising, you should be 
vitally interested in these new 
coverage and circulation data. 
They provide an accurate pic- 
ture of WLW's total coverage 
in terms of homes reached . . . 
intensity of coverage in terms of 
minutes listened . . . share of 
total listening within the area 
. . . the comparative perform- 



ance of WLW and its leading 
competitors. 

For example: during the four 
report weeks, WLW reached 
81.2% of all radio homes in the 
area between 6 AM and mid- 
night, as compared to 29.3% 
averaged by the next 15 leading 
stations. And among these 
homes reached by WLW, the 
number of minutes of listening 
during the average week was 
550 for The Nation's Station, as 
compared to 233 minutes of lis- 



tening per week averaged by the 
next 15 stations. 

Even more remarkable, we be- 
lieve, is the fact that WLW re- 
ceived one fifth— 19.3% —of all 
listening to all 175 stations 
heard within the area. 

WLW Sales Offices in Cincin- 
nati, New York or Chicago will 
be glad to show you this new 
NRI report. On the West Coast, 
contact the Keenan & Eickelberg 
office in Los Angeles or San 
Francisco. 




CROSLEY BROADCASTING CORPORATION 




Looking for an unusual 

Morning Program 

in the 

Look at . . . listen to . . . Koffec Korner 
... a working program over WJW 
8:05 to 8:25 AM across the board ... or 
talk to your nearest representative 
of the Headley-Reed Company. 





• In the popular whodunit tradition . . . pro- 
ducer and announcer do a daily comedy strip 
called Trick Dacev. 



• Brisk, bright music . . . 
sound effects for mood 
and contrast . . . that's what 
the band tries for and gets ! 



• Jane Steven's cheery 
comment and light touch 
with weather reports and 
time signals high point 
Koffee Korner. 





B,f<S\Q 

ABC Network 



CLEVELAND 



850 KC 

5000 Waffs 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HEADLEY-REED 



COMPANY 



■»™ * I u— . K V.L. I 



1 rau-ii*T~ I ^ 



I — 



FEBRUARY 1948 • ssooaVear 

6'^ 



^:^^ 



\/^o 



oAco^^ 



Ase^V^^^^!^ 



How fast can radio work? • p. 54 

Radio's independent press agents • p. 23 

TV. ..more film than live • p. 31 

Non-listening is YOUR business • p. 59 

Oxydol sparkle girl (Julie Conway) • Cover 



iCB5 



.tg^ 




should you keep to the ground? 




ifTlTH seven stations in seven communities, the Fort Industrv 
'■ Companv has seven ears to the ground. Each one. alert to 
local listening preferences, builds and promotes in its own area. 
This basic local experience plus the alert, aggressive Fort Industr)^ 
Companv pool of radio and marketing know-how results in 
stronger stations ... in Fort Industry stations that click with 
local listeners. 

. . . seven stations in seven conirtiiuiities nienns seven ears 
to the ground for Fort Industry stations . . . keeping 
them informed of trends, alerted, aggressive, progressive. 




THE FORT INDUSTRY COMPANY 

W Sl'i). Iol.<lo. (). . \<^ \ A. Vt lu-.Iiiif;, Vi. >a. • V» MMN. I ainiioiil. \^ . Va. 
Vt i.OK, l.ima, O. • W J iJk, Detroit, Mi<h. • WA(;A. Allanla, Ga. • VKiBS. Miami. Ha. 
National Sales Headquarters: 527 Lexington Ave., New York 17, Eldorado 5-2455 



" 1 oi/ inn hiiuk itn a 
fort Itidiialry Station" 



N 1 !>■_.. t. \rZ. » 



-_tl 




Order 
Form 



Subsrripl 

Order 

Form 




SPONSOR R 



S... SPONSOR REPORTS. 




FEBRUARY 1948 



TOBACCO RADIO 
ADVERTISERS 
DO MOST 
BUSINESS 



ZIV'S 
1,000,000 
FEET OF 
STOCK FILM 



D-F-S 
FIRST IN 
NETWORK 
BILLING 



REICHHOLD ' S 

MUSICAL 

BARGAIN? 



SOMETHING 
NEW IN 
CLEVELAND 



Tobacco's big users of broadcast advertising did practically all of 
cigarette business in 1946. Under 1 per cent of all cigarette sales 
were made by non-radio advertisers. Camels made greatest advance 
during year, doing 28.1% of all cigarette business. Lucky Strike 
is still first with 31.6% of the business. Chesterfield has bought 
Giants baseball games for TV over NBC network. Tobacco industry 
predictions are that Camels will pass Lucky Strike in two years and 
regain first slot which they held pre-war. 

-SR- 

Frederic W. Ziv's TV film subsidiary has over 1,000,000 feet of 
stock shots ideal for bridges during live air shows and as backing 
for commercials. Ziv bought General Film's library and is estab- 
lishing film production unit to make TV film just as he makes tran- 
scriptions for radio stations. 

-SR- 

Importance of daytime programing is indicated in year-end reports 
which show Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample first among agencies placing 
network business. D-F-S placed twice as much business with networks 
as second placer, J. Walter Thompson. Former's billing was $21,- 
155,292, latter's $10,707,632. Foote, Cone & Belding, Benton & 
Bowles, Compton, and Young & Rubicam placed around $8,000,000 each. 
BBD&O was in $6,000,000 class. Blow, Kenyon & Eckhardt, and Ward 
Wheelock in $5,000,000 class. Spot placement figures when com- 
puted will radically change rank order of agencies. Also figures 
include only gross time costs and would be further changed if pro- 
gram costs (often bigger than time) were added. 

-SR- 

Henry Reichhold's amazing deal with Detroit AFM was revealed when 
union changed mind. Reichhold was permitted to sponsor broadcasts 
of Detroit Symphony Orchestra over ABC at sustaining rates and to 
record hour-long program for home records while it was on air. 
Petrillo's disk prohibition killed recording part of deal which in 



Reichhold's mind justified broadcasting series 
off air. 

-SR- 



Series is now 



Fight for Cleveland's listening audience will shortly be intensi- 
fied. WTAM, which for years has lacked "local personality," will 
undergo complete revamping under John McCormick, ex-manager of WKRC, 
Cincinnati, and more recently NBC account executive in Chicago. 
Other Cleveland stations have been very conscious of need for iden- 
tifying themselves with local problems. It now becomes five-way 
battle (even little daytime WJMO is doing a job in its own way) . 



SPONSOR. Vol. 2, !\'o. //, February i9U8. Published monthly by Sponsor Publications Inc. Publication offices: 5800 jV. .Mervine St.. Philadilphia 'it. Pa. Acbertisina. Editor- 
ial 'jtnd Circulation offices, !iO W. 52 St., New York 19, N. Y. Acceptance under the act of June 5. 193 'i at Philadelphia. Pennsylcania. authorized December 2, 19!i7. 



FEBRUARY 1948 



ANNOUNCEMENTS ' 
ONE-MINUTE 
MINirv.UM CHARGE 



RADIO ADS 



NO FACTOR IN 
ANTI-TRUST CASES 



Quotation of one-minute charge for all announcements, station 
breaks, etc., on ABC owned and managed stations, regardless of what 
part of a minute is used, is indicative of general trend in direc- 
tion of such minimum charge. 

-SR- 

Of firms involved in the 81 anti-trust cases pending in U. S. De- 
partment of Justice only 17 use broadcast time, two have formerly 
done so. Although material printed in magazine and newspaper adver- 
tising is part of government's case, no current broadcast continuity 
has been requisitioned nor is there expectation that any will be. 

-SR- 

Music Corporation of America is signing up small independent film 
producers to represent them in selling TV rights to stations, 
agencies, sponsors. MCA charges regular artists' rep fee. 10 per 
cent, for this service. 

-SR- 

Transcription firms were generally in red at end of 1947 due to 
tremendous sums poured into making masters to keep musical programs 
running for two years despite record ban. Only firms that were 
actually sales representatives rather than producers made money. 

-SR- 

Regular broadcast stations authorized by March 1 will exceed 2,000 
according to Washington advices. FM station authorizations may hit 
1,200 and if log jam is broken TV stations authorized will pass 100 
mark. These figures do not include educational, international, or 
experimental stations. 

-SR- 

Goebel Brewing Company will, for first time in history, spend over 
$1,000,000 for advertising in '48. Beer will make serious bid for 
national business. Network set up especially for Detroit Tiger 
baseball broadcasts by Goebel will be expanded. Detroit Lions and 
Chicago Rockets football games will be broadcast and televised this 
year also. Over 50% of Goebel budget goes into broadcasting. 

-SR- 

Eighty-four per cent of all automobiles produced in 1948 will be 
radio-equipped. Auto radio production in '47 hit new high of 
2,860,000 units, 265,000 increase over previous high hit in '41. 

Figures compiled by Frank W. Mansfield, sales research head of 

Sylvania Electric, which supplies about 16% of all car radios 
through subsidiary. Colonial Radio. 

-SR- 

LOCAL COMMERCIAL Local commercial broadcasting passed network time billings in 1947, 

BUSINESS PASSES ^'^^ first time in broadcast history. Although final figures aren't 

NFTWORK BILLING ^^ V^t , NAB ' s protectable sample reveals that local business was 

$136,000,000 and national network billing $125,796,000. 



MCA REPRESENTS 
FILM FROCUCERS 
RE TV 



LITTLE 
PROFIT IN 
1947 E.T. 
PRODUCTION 



A.M. STATIONS 
EXPECTED TO 
PASS 2,000 BY 
MARCH 



GOEBEL 
BUDGET 
$1,000,000 



AUTO RADIOS 
HIT NEW HIGH 
IN 1947 



SPONSOR 



"■^ •• ■ ■■ 




BVefiYMWE 



Your Product Makes 



•where it's been! — where It's going! 



OKLAHOMA CITY CONTINUING 
CONSUMER PANEL 

Reports issued quarterly on day-to-day purchases of 400 
representative families in Metropolitan Oklahoma City covering 
40 different food and drug classifications. Regular reports for 
each classification cover: 



1. Brands Purchased 

2. Number of Families Buying 

3. Number of Units Purchased 



4. Weight or Size of Units 

5. Dollar Volume 

6. Place of Purchase 



In addition, special analyses making use of the complete 
biographical material and purchase records are possible. Full 
details on request. 

pr WKY^ 



Every time a food or drug item is purchased in Oklahoma City, 
a "detective" picks up the trail and shadov^s it constantly. 

The 400 families composing the Oklahoma City Continuing 
Consumer Panel arc the "detectives." They were chosen v^ith such 
representativeness that they actually form a perfect miniature of 
Oklahoma City's quarter-million-person metropolitan area. 

That's why today in Oklahoma City food and drug advertisers 
know exactly who is purchasing what, where they buy it, how often 
they buy, how much they buy and what they pay for it. Furthermore, 
they can, if they wish, secure almost any kind of special information 
concerning a product's behavior from the moment of purchase. 

This kind of information is available to you now on a continu- 
ing basis. Send today for the Quarterly Report of the Oklahoma City 
Consumer Panel covering your product classification, together with 
particulars concerning the wealth of special product information 
obtainable from the day-by-day family purchase records. 



THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING CO.: The Farmer-Stockman — WKY. Oklahoma City — KVOR, Colorado Springs 
KLZ, Denver and WEEK, Peoria, Affiliated in Management - REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

FEBRUARY 1948 



# 



I w. "^ 



\^ 



mm ^^^* 



SPONSOR REPORTS 1 

40 WEST 52ND 4 

NEW AND RENEW 9 

PS 14 

BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 19 
MR. SPONSOR: JAMES H. CARMINE 20 

PRESS AGENTS EXTRAORDINARY 23 

WASH ON THE AIR 27 

SPOT LISTENING CHECK 29 

TV AND FILM 30 

PUBLISHERS ONiTHEfAIR 34 

FARMrEXPLOITATION 39 

DAYTIME TV 42 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 44 

SPOT TRENDS 48 

ITS FM PROMOTION & PROGRAMS 51 

CONTESTS AND OFFERS 52 

SATURATION THROUGH RADIO 54 

YOUR PROBLEM: NON-LISTENING 59 

SIGNED AND UNSIGNED 72 

TV-FM-FAX 78 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 83 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 94 

APPLAUSE 94 




Published monthly by IPONIOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Executive, 
ii^torial, and Advertiaing Officea: 40 West 52 Street, New 
Yorkl9. .S.Y. Telephone: Plaia 3-6216. Chicajo Office: 410 
.N. Michigan. Telephone: Whitehall 3540. Publication Officea: 
5800 North Mervine Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. Subscrip- 
tions; United States $5 a year; Canada $5.50. Single copies 60c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1947 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 



President and Publisher: Norman R. Glenn. Seeretar;- 
Treasurer: Elaine C. Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. Koehler. 
Associate Editors: Frank Bannister, Charles Sinclair. Art 
Director; Howard Wechsler. Advertiaing Dir»>ctor: Lester 
J. Blumenthal. Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper; 
' Chicago .Manager I Kav Brown; (Los Angeles) Duncan A.Scott 
*Co.,44S S.Hill St.; (San Francisco) Duncan A. Scott * Co., 
Mills Bldg. Circulation Manager: Milton Kaye. 



< I )VE R PICTCRE: If they televised the Oxjdol commercial, this 
' ,* ' ' '' va would look like as she Ooooohs that Oxydol 
sparkle 



L 40 West 5200 

ANOTHER SPOT SUGGESTION 

John Blair and I read with j^rcat inter- 
est and complete agreement your editorial 
entitled "Spot Needs a Name" in the 
December issue. 

However, in your feature "Spot 
Trends" you say, "Based on the number 
of spots (programs and announcements) 
placed . . . etc." Why don't you just 
eliminate the word "spots" in that con- 
nection and say, "Based on the number of 
programs and announcements ..." 

As you point out in your editorial, spot 
broadcasting means much more than an- 
nouncements alone. The whole purpose 
of getting a new name for spot Is to over- 
come misunderstanding on the part of 
sponsors and agency people alike, who 
confuse spot announcements and spot 
broadcasting and make them mean one 
and the same thing. Shouldn't we adopt 
a policy of referring to announcements as 
announcements and not spots, to help 
lessen the confusion factor? 

Wells H. Barnett, Jr. 
Sales development manager 
John Blair & Co., Chicago 

COMPARAGRAPH INFORMATION 

FIND SPONSOR COMPARAGRAPH MOST 
HELPFUL IS IT POSSIBLE TO GET 
ADDITIONAL COPY 

LENORE LITTLE 
WOOD, GRAND RAPIDS 

Current four-network-program Compnragraph is in 
each issue. Extra copies are available. 



READER SERVICE 

IS THERE ANY WAY TO SECURE COPY OF 
SPOT EFFECTIVENESS STUDY REFERENCE 
PAGE ONE PARAGRAPH TWO JUNE SPONSOR 
STOP OR ANY AUTHORITATIVE ARTICLE 
EFFECTIVENESS SPOTS, FLASHES, AND 
STATION BREAKS STOP YOUR ADVICE 
WOULD BE APPRECIATED 

HAL WILLIAMS 

DOMINION BROADCASTING CO. 

TORONTO 
Edward Petry is sending his first spot study to Mr. 
Williams at SPOP^SOHs request. 



RESEARCH INFORMATION? 

Wc would appreciate ver>' much your 
sending us tw^o additional copies of the 
October issue of sponsor. 

We are making this request because of 
our interest in your article on the Lazars- 
fcld Stanton method of measuring audi- 
ence reaction to radio shows. 

Darrell M. Brisbin 
Research Department 
Fitzgerald Advertising Agency 
New Orleans 
(Please turn to page 6) 



ACTinj\ 

WITH 

WWSW! 

Watch Gallagher! . . The crowd 
cheers, and sure nufT, it's another 
fieldgcffll for the Duquesne DukesI 
. . . Right in there following the ball 
for Pittsburgh' listirners is WWSW 
. . . the station that' leads in sportsi 
Lost fall, listeners jam''''^^6K:ked 
around their radios to hear NX^'^SW 
bring them the Steeler Gamcb. NV a 
fans cheer Pittsburgh's leadiiig col- 
legiate basketball team,- the Du- 
quesne Dukes, over W^'SW! And 
in spring, look for a record breaking 
audience when WWSW Steps out 
with the Pirates for another baseball 
season! 

Yes' ... its attion with WWSW 
in professional, collegiate and scho- 
lastic sports. And after 14 years of 
broadcasting sports tQ a "capacity " 
audience, WWSW is STILL the un- 
contested leader! ... That's why, 
through the seasons, WWSW is a 
"listening must"" .with Pittsburgh 
sport fans! The RESULTS: the big- 
ger our audience . . . the bigger your 
sales. So come on, be "sponsor wise", 
join the national* and local adver- 
tisers, who, year in, year out, hitch 
their sales wagon to the station that 
bags MORE LISTENERS PER 
DOLLAR IN PITTSBURGH . . . 
WWSW! 

*Ask For joe. 

WWSW 

l'itlsliiir(]h's 
Li'iidinn liidi>|it*ndf>iil! 



- •■ •-"""^i-.i- . 



^- »■ ■ ^- 



>-mn' I 




■eoc* Htcht 



One station 



KCMO Vi millivolt contour map 
50,000 Watts Non-Directional - Daytime 
superimposed over actual mail count map* 



One set of call letters 
One spot on the dial 
One rate card 



50,000 Waffs Day . . . 

10,000 Waffs Nigbf-on 810 kc 

Nafional Represenfafive: 
John E. Pearson Co. 

Boje mop courtesy Broadcasting Magazine 




*387 COUNTIES- 174 more than the 213 in 
the KCMO Vi millivolt area— that's KCMO's mail 
response for the first 4 months at 50,000 watts. 
This includes 100 counties in Missouri, 79 in 
Kansas, 51 in Nebraska, 70 in Iowa, 21 in 
Oklahoma, 33 in Arkansas, 33 in Illinois. And 
mail came in from 20 other states! We'll gladly 
send details of this mail response. Write or call. 

KCMO 



Kansas City, Mo. — Basic ABC for Mid-America 



FEBRUARY 1948 




m 




BI 




MUSIC IS NO PASSING FANCY a love of fine music is no passing fancy. 

It is intense, devout, ever-growing . . . makes the music lover a special 

kind of radio listener ... a listener devoted to the programs of WQXR-WQXQ. 

More than half a million music loving families in and around New York 

listen habitually to WQXR-WQXQ ... to the extent that no other 

station can reach them as effectively. Leading advertisers are concentrating 

more and more on this huge audience . . . selling their products through the 

interest created by good music. For greater sales 

in the world's greatest market, use WQXR-WQXQ 

. . . the stations distinguished for good 

music and the news bulletins of 

The New York Times. 



WQXR 



. . .and FM Station WQXQ 
Radio Stations of The New York Timet 



(Continued from page 4) 

APPLAUDS INDUSTRY STUDIES 

You don't have to sell me sponsor. I 
have been thoroughly sold since seeing the 
first issue. As far as helping salesmen and 
agency men, sponsor not only puts all 
other trade magazines in the shade — they 
are not even in the running as far as I am 
concerned! I particularly like your in- 
dustry analysis. We, incidentally, do not 
have on hand all copies of sponsor since 
its first issue and are very anxious to bring 
our library up to date. Is it at all con- 
ceivable or possible that we could buy all 
issues published not shown on the at- 
tached list which indicates what we now 
have? 

Vincent A. Francis 
Account executive 
ABC, San Francisco 



We really enjoy the concise reports and 
the many innovations you have brought 
to us guys in the industry. 

J. Slatter 

President 

Radio Representatives Ltd., Toronto 



FAMILY RADIO EXPENDITURES 

On the very first page of your January 
issue, I noticed an item quoting Dr. O. 
H. Caldwell on the amounts spent in the 
United States for radio in 1947. You 
might be interested in a breakdown of 
some of these figures, which I had an 
occasion to use recently in order to bring 
up to date some statistics which I have 
found useful for many years. 

I wanted to know what the typical 
American radio-owning family sp>ent in 
1947 for its radio listening. This meant 
eliminating advertisers' expenditures and 
the amounts allocated for television. 
Adding Dr. Caldwell's figures of $800,- 
000,000 for new radios sold to the public. 
$75,000,000 spent for servicing, $190,000,- 
000 for tubes, parts, and supplies, and 
$220,000,000 for electric current, I came 
up with a total of $1,285,000,000. Di- 
viding this by 35,900,000 radio fam- 
ilies produced a figure of $35.79 per 
radio family. 

Going a little further, if we divide by 
the total of all U. S. families (which was 
38,575.000 as of January 1, 1947), includ- 
ing non-radio homes, we get a figure of 
$33.31 p>er family. This $33.31 represents 
the average American family's "sub- 
scription price" for radio listening. The 
(Please turn to page 12) 

SPONSOR 



•■ V :rt 



- "v 



LEVER BROTHERS COMPANY 

50 MEMORIAL DMVE 
CAMBMDGE 39. MASSACHUSETTS 



Spokane, V.'nshlnRton 
October 27, 5.947 



Mr. Richard Wheeler 
Radio Station KXLY 
Symons Building 
Spokane, Washington 

Dear Mr. Wheeler: 

Just a note to tell you how much we of Lever 
Brothers Company appreciate the Svran Soap Parade of 
Products Week you put on for us over your station 
and to try to shovr you the results of your effort. 

Floor and window displays v;ere built in 33 
Spokane grocery stores. In addition 215 Swan Soap 
Week cards and 193 Swan Soap Week banners v;ere dis- 
played prominently, calling attention to the Parade 
of Products Week, 

After checking our records, we found that in the 
area covered by your broadcasts our business on Swan 
Soap improved considerably. As near as can be ascer- 
tained approximately 15,000 bars of Swan Soap vere 
moved in Spokane d\iring the week of the broadcast. 

Although this is not the first Lever Brothers 
Company appearance on the Parade of Products Week 
it is my first, end I wish to thank you again for' 
your splendid v/ork and cooperation. Should you care 
to repeat it at some future date, I am quite sure we 
can give you our whole-hearted cooueration. 



Yoiirs very sincerely, 

Lever Brothers Company 
Spokane Sales Representative 





Boi I9S6— Bu«e, Montana 

Symons Building — Spokone, Wosh. 

Orptieum 3ldg. — Portlond, Oregon 

6381 .Hoflywood Bl«'d.— Hollywood 2S 

79 Post St —Son Francisco 4 

The Wolker Co., 15 W. 10th St., Konsos City 

The Wolker Co., 360 N. Mich., Chicago 

The Wolker Co , 551 5th Ave., New York 

The Wolker Co., 330 Hcnn. A»e.. Minneopolis 



"HOME TOWN" 



^STATIONS 



FEBRUARY 1948 



Hoe>000.000.00{H 



1 HE vast f)otential of the Southwest is inspiring more and more 
expansion in this area by some of America's largest manufacturers. In 
Tulsa, alone, $125,000,000.00 is already allocated for industrial develop- 
ment by new, outside money during 1948. This is an indication that 
successful industrialists believe in Oklahoma's future and that they are 
betting on Tulsa as the best spot in this great state. And no wonder! 
Northeastern Oklahoma, where dA percent of Oklahoma's industrial capacity 
is located, is the center of the state's electrical power development, oil and 
gas supplies, coal production, water resources, lead and zinc and an ample 
supply of native white manpower. 

As industry expands markets expand. This means Northeastern Okla- 
homa is the place to put advertising dollars to work most profitably. 

KVOO, alone, serves all of this most important Oklahoma area plus 
equally important areas of adjacent states. Set your schedule for 1948 now 
and sell this great market in the heart of Babson's Magic Circle over 
Oklahoma's Greatest Station. 




Edward Retry & Co., Inc., . 



NBC AFFILIATE 



National Representatives 



SPONSOR 



^" ••>—*••• < ^^ «• 



, r.^>.■»T- I _ -r 



new and renew 



J^eia AcUla^uU SpxU Budined^d, 



;1 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



American Chicle Co 
American Home Products Co 



Atlantic Refining Co 
Bendix Home Appliances 

Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Co 

Curtis Publishing Co 

Garrett Wine Co 
General Baidng Co 

Goebbel Brewing Co 

Hat Research Foundation 
P. Lorillard Co 

National Biscuit Co 
Park & Tilford Co 
Pepsi-Cola Co 

Sherwin-Williams Co 
Standard Brands Inc 

♦Station list already set. 



Gum Badger & Browning & 

Hersey 

Chef Boy-Ar-Dee Young & Rubicam 

Guard's Cold Dancer-Fitzgerald 

Tablets Sample 

Petroleum products N. W. Ayer 

Washing machines Tatham-Lairt' 



Rugs 
Lustre-Creme 

Shampoo 
Holiday Magazine 



Young & Rubicam 
Lennen & Mitchell 

BBD&O 



Virginia Dare Wines Ruthrauff & Ryan 
Baked goods BBD&O 



Beer 

Institutional 
Embassy Cigarettes 

Shredded Wheat 

Tintex 

Evervess 

Lin-X 

Blue Bonnet 
Margarine 



Brooke, Smith, French 

& Dorrance 
Foote, Cone & Belding 
Geyer, Newell & Ganger 

McCann-Erickson 
Charles Storm 
Young & Rubicam 

Newell-Emmett 
Ted Bates 



25-50 E.t. breaks; Feb-Mar (adding to current campaigns); 
13-52 wks* 
50 E.t. spots, breaks; Feb 2; 10 wks 
20-3U E.t. spots, breaks (extending winter campaigns); Feb 

15; 6 wks 
30-40 Spot baseball broadcasts; Apr 15; season* 
40-50 15-min spot programs, spots, breaks; Feb-Mar-Apr; 
13 wks 
20 E.t. spots, breaks; Mar 1; 13 wks 
50 E.t. spots, breaks; Mar 1-30; 6-13 wks 

2-3 E.t. spots, breaks (special niarket promotion — New 

Orleans); Feb 15; 4 wks 
20 E.t. spots, breaks; Jan -Feb; 6 wk- 
10 E.t. spots, breaks (adding to current campaigns); Feb 

1 ; 13 wks* 
20 Live, e.t., spots, breaks; Mar-Apr; 13-52^wks 

20 Spots, breaks, participations; Mar-Apr; 13 wks 
1 E.t. spots, breaks (test campaign in Cleveland — ex- 

panding later); Feb 1: 13 wks 
100 Spots in "Musical Clock" shows; F'eb I; 13-39wk8 
100 E.t. spots; Feb I; 13 wks* 
15-20 E.t. spots, breaks; Feb 1 (expanding current national 
campaigns); 13 wks 
20 Spots, breaks; F'eb-Mar; 13 wks 
40 E.t. spots, breaks; Feb 15; 13 wks 



A/euA and He4>t&cae<i (Ui, ^el^aUian 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



\< 



Peter Ballantine & Sons 
Botany Worsted Mills 
Brentwood Sportswear 
L. S. Briggs Inc (meats) 
Jay Bucknell Inc 
Bulova Watch Co 
BVD Corp 

Chevrolet Dealers 



J. Walter Thompson 

Silberstein-Goldsmith 

J. R. Kupsick 

Courtland D. Ferguson 

Direct 

Biow 

Grey • 

Edward Shapiro 

Campbell-Ewald 



Columbia Wholesalers 

(Phiico dlstrib.) 
Elgin National Watch Co 
Food Fair 

General Foods Corp 
Gulf Cil Corp 

Heinel Motors 
Pepsi-Cola Co 

Powell & Campbell Shoe Co 
R. J. Reynolds Co 
Sun Radio Co 

Thornton Fuller Co (Dodge- 
Plymouth dlstrib.) 
Transmirra Products Corp 
U. S. Rubber Co 

Vick Chemical Corp 
Walco Sales Co 



Kal, Ehrllch & Merrick 

J. Walter Thompson 

Direct 

Y'oung & Rubicam 

Young & Rubicam 

Soils S. Cantor 

Young & Rubicam 

Sterling 

William Esty 

Kal, Ehrllch & Merrick 

Aldrich 



WFIL-TV, Phila. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WNBT, N,^ Y. 
WNBW, Wash. 
WABD, N. Y. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WNBW, Wash. 
WFIL-TV, Phila. 
WABD, N. Y. 
WFIL-TV, Phila. 
WWJ-TV, Detroit] 
WBKB, Chi. . 
KSD-TV, St. Louis 
K TLA, L. A. 
WTTG. Wash. 
WMAR, Balto. 
WABD. N. Y. 
WTTG. Wash. 
WWJ-TV, Detroit 
WBKB, Chi. 
WNBW, Wash.H 

WNBT, N. Y.- 
WFIL-TV, Phila. 
WABD, N. Y. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WCBS-TV. N. Y.I 
WFIL-TV, Phila. 
WCBS-TV, N. Y. 
WABD, N. Y. 
NBC-TV (5 stations) 
WNBW. Wash. 
WFIL-TV, Phlla. 



Smith, Bull & McCreery WABD, N. Y 
Campbell-Ewald WCBS-TV, N. Y. 



Morse International 
Scheck 



WNBT, N. Y. 
WABD, N. Y. 
WFIL-TV, Phlla. 



Spots; Jan 21; 13 wks (n) 
WealluT spols; Jan 16; 13 wks (r) 
Weather spols (preceding boxing); Jan 5; 5 wks (r) 
Spots; Jan II; 13 wks (n) 

Spols in "Doorway lo Fame"; 7:30-8 pm; Jan 26; 52 wks (r) 
Time signals; Jan 1; 13 wks (r) 
Spots; Jan 4; 8 wks (r) 
Spots; Jul) 1:13 wks (n) 

Winter Olympics films; 15 mins nightly as scheduled; Feb 1; 
10 days (n) 



INS TeleTlsion News; Jan 8; 13 wks (n) 



Spots; Jan 7; 13 wks (n) 

Time signals; Jan 4; 13 wks (r) 

Meet Your Neighbor; Wed 8:10-8:25 pm; Jan 1; 26 wks (n) 

Spois; Jan I; 8 wks (r) 

You Are an Artist; Ih 9-9:15 pm; Jan 1; 13 wks (r) 

News — Doug Edwards; Th 8-8:15 pm; Jan 1; 52 wks (r) 

Gohig Plates (lilm); Th 8:10-8:40 pm; Jan 15; 26 wks (n) 

Film spots; Jan 10; 13 wks (n) 

Spots; Jan 22; 50 wks (n) 

Giants Baseball Games; May-Sep (n) 

Spots; Jan 2; 13 wks (n) 

Rockets Ice Hockey Games; Wed 8:25-10:45 pm; Jan 1; 13 wks (n) 

Spots; Dec 29; 13 wks (r) 

Naiionul Sportsmen's Show; Feb 14; 8-8:30 pm; 2 wks (n) 

Winter Olympics films; as scheduled; Feb 1; 5 days (n) 

Spots; Jan 5; 13 wks (n) 

Spots; Jan 5; 6 wks (n) 

Spots; Jan 10; 4 wks (n) 



I FEBRUARY 1947 




Ne4A^ 0*t filei4AMn>lu 



SPONSOR 



AGFNCy 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Kalstaff Rrewlnft Co 

John Hancock Mutual I-tfo 

Insurance Co 
Piedmont Shirt Co 
Raymond Laboratories Inc 
Texan Co 
r. S. Army Rccrultlnft Service 



Dancer-Fltzderald-Sample 

McCann-F.rlckson 

William H. Welntraub 
Roche. Williams & Cleary 
Kudner 
N. W. Ayer 



NBC 


SO 


ABC 


7,« 


MBS 
ARC 
ABC 
NBC 


ISO 

2VS 
161 



Music from the Heart of America; Th 9:50-10 pm; Feb 2: 

52 wks 
tPolnt Sublime; Mon 8-8:30 pm; Dec 29 (22-wk extension) 

William I,. Shlrer: Sun I-I:1S pm; Jan 4: 52 wks 
Henrv MorH-jn: Th 7:30-8 nm; Jan 29: 52 wks 
•Star Theater; Wed 10:30-11 pm; Dec 31; 51 wks 
Fred Warlnft; MW 10-10:30 am; Feb 2 (indefinite) 



*New on network. ^Expanded network. 

Fiftv-hrn irrrks qeryfrnUv mrnns n 11-}rerk rnnlrnri trith riptinng fnr .7 itiwcesnire 13-icefk rrneimh. lift snhjrrt tn ronrellntinn nt ih^ end iif nrtv 13-iPeeb period) 



He^teiuaU Oh. AatidMt^Ju 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM. «me. *1art, duration 



American Meat Institute 
n. T. Babbitt Inc 

Carnation Co 

Carter Products Inc 

Ceneral Motors Corp 

(Prlaidalre div) 
Coodvear Tire & Rubber Co 
Charles F. Hires Co 
International Sliver Co 
KellogfS Co 

Lever Brothers Co 

Mall Pouch Tobacco Co 

Miles Laboratories Inc 
Philip Morris & Co Ltd 

Mutual Benefit Health &- 

.\ccidcnt Assn 
Procter & Gamble Co 



Serutan Co 

W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co 
Sterllnft Druft Inc 

(Centaur Co dlv) 
TonI Company Inc 
I'nlversal Match Corn 

CSchutter Candv Co dlv) 
Wine Growers Guild 



Leo Burnett 


NBC: 


161 


Duane Jones 


CBS 


.54 




NBC 


96 


Frwin, Wasey 


NBC 


149 


Sullivan. Stauffer. Col well & 


MBS 


404 


Bayles 






Kudner 


MBS 


428 


Foote. Cone & Beldinit 


CBS 


160 


Kudner 


ABC 


207 


N. W. Aver 


CBS 


84 


Yountl & Rublcam 


CBS 


1.50 


Ken yon & Eckhardt 


ABC 


184 
180 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


NBC 


149 


Young & Rublcam 


CBS 


145 


Walker & Downing; 


MBS 


99 


Wade 


MBS 


4.50 


Blow 


NBC 


141 




CBS 


144 


Ruthrauff & Ryan 


MBS 


439 


Benton & Bowles 


CB.^ 
CBSI 


^4 


Compton 


» ^s 






Dancer-Fltzgerald-Sample 


CB5^ 


rtso 


Roy Durstlne 


MBS 


211 
116 


Russel M. Seeds 


NBC» 


162 


Younfi & Rublcam 


NBd 


140 


Foote, Cone & Beldlng 


CBS 


160 


Schwimmer & Scott 


ABC 


185 



Honiii-Cooper 



ABC 



65 



Fred Warlnfi; TTh 10-10:30 am: Jan 13; 52 wks 
David Harum: M TWTF 10:45-11 am; Jan 12; 52 wks 
Lora Lawton: MTWTF 11:45-12 n; Jan 5; 52 wks 
Carnation Contented Hour; Mon 10-10:30 pm; Jan 5; 

52 wks 
Gabriel Ileatter; MW 9-9:15 pm; Dec 29; 52 wks 

Henrv J. Tavlor; MF 7:30-7:45 pm; Dec 19; 52 wks 

Man Called X; Sun 8:30-8:55 pm: 52 wks 

Greatest Story Ever Told; Sun 6:.30-7 pm; Jan 25; 52wks 

Here's to You; Sun 5-5:15 pm; Jan 25; 52 wks 

Ozzle & Harriet; Fri 9:30-10 pm; Jan 2; 39 wks 

Tom Breneman's Breakfast in Hollywood; MTWTF 11 :15- 

11:30 am; Dec 29; 52 wks 
Galen Drake: MTWTF 1 1 :.30-lI :45 am; Dec 29; 52 wks 
.\mos 'n' Andv; Tu 9-9:30 pm: Jan 6; 52 wks 
My Friend Irma; Mon 10-10:30 pm: Dec 29; 52 wks 
Fishing & Hunting Club of the Air; Mon 10-10:30 pm; 

Dec 22; 52 wks 
Oueen for a Dav; MTWTF 2-2:,30 pm; Dec 29; 52 wks 
Milton Berle; Tu 8-8:30 pm; Jan 20; 52 wks 
It Pays to Be Ignorant; Frl 10-10:30 pm; Jan .30; 39 wks 
Gabriel Heatter; Sun 7:30-8 pm; Jan II; 52 wks 

Rosemary; MTWTF 11 :45-12 n; Dec 29; .39 wks 

Big Sister; MTWTF 1-1:15 pm; Dec 29; 39 wks 

Young Dr. Malone; MTWTF 1 :30-l :45 pm: Dec 29; 39 wks 

Guiding Light; MTWTF 1 :45-2 pm; Dec 29; .39 wks 

Ma Perkins; MTWTF 1:1.5-1 :.30 pm; Dec 29; .39 wks 

Gabriel Heatter; TTh 9-9:15 pm; Jan 1; 52 wks 

Victor LIndlahr; MT%VTF 12:15-I2:,30 pm; Jan 1; 52 wks 

Sheaffer Parade: Sun 3-3:30 pm; Jan 4; 52 wks 

Molle Mystery Theater: Frl 10-10:30 pm; Jan 23; 52 wks 

Give & Take; Sat 2-2:30 pm; Jan 3; 52 wks 

David Harding — Counterspy: Sun 5:30-6 pm; Feb 1; 52 

wV<j 
Murder & Mr. Malone; Sat 9:30-10 pm; Jan 10; 38 wks 



AenA /Jt^enc^ ^fLpAuiimentd. 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATION 



PROGRAM, time, rtarl, duration 



Abraham & .Straus Inc, N. Y Department store KJe.sewetter, Wetterau & Baker. N. Y. 

.\dler Hotels. L. A Hotels MUton Weinberg, L. \. 

Allied .\rtists, L. .\ Motion pictures Buchanan, L. .K. 

American Trust Co, S. F Banking services McCann-Erickson, S. F. 

Beam Products Inc. Jersey City, N. J Silver tarnish preventative Deutsch & Shea, .V. Y. 

Hre:ikfast fHub Coffee Inc. L. A Coffee Brisacher. Van Norden, L. .A. 

Canadian Chewing Gum Co, Toronto Chiclets Baker. Toronto 

(Canadian Cooperative Wool-Growers Ltd, Toronto. . . . Institutional Reynolds. Toronto 

(:ol)bs Fruit & Preserving Co, Miami Gift ba.skcts Badger & Browning & Hersey, Boston 

Coca-Cola of C^anada Ltd, Toronto Coca-Cola D'Arcy. Toronto 

Craig Oil Co of (Uitifomla, L. A Petroleum products Tullls. L. .A. 

Doubleday & Co. N. Y Dollar Book Club, Omnibook Magazine . Huher Hoge. N. Y. 

Dnicketl <>i, Toronto Drano Young & Rublcam. Toronto 

Fideletone Recording Corp, N. Y Musical Instruction ..Seymour Kameny, N. Y. 

Furmbilt Clothes Inc, L. A Men's clothing chain Robert F. Dennis. L. A. 

R. II. Fyfe & Co, Detroit Shoes Dundes & Frank. N. Y. 

General Foods Ltd, Toronto Maxwell House Coffee Baker, Toronto 

General Motors Corp (Delco Appliance div), 

Rochester. N. Y Household appliances Foote. Cone & Belding, Chi. 

Ilaffenreffer & Co Inc, Boston Pickwick Ale Harold Cjibot. Boston 

Hat Research Foundation, N. Y Institutional Foote. Cone & Belding, N. Y. 

Hull Hotels Inc, L. A Hotels Milton Weinberg. L. A. 

Jacks<in Bros., N. Y Shoes Hoot. N. Y. 

Jacobson Bros, .V. Y. Shoes Hoot. N. Y. 

Kronke .\wning C>), Oakland Fiesta fabrics Ad Fried, Oakland 

Lanolin (^)rp of America, L. A Lanogene Allied. L. \. 

Martin Laboratories Inc, Sibley, Iowa Animal remedies .Meneough, Martin & .Seymour. Des Moines 

Metropolitan Boston I'sed Car Dealers Assn, Boston. .Trade assn Harry M. Frost. Boston 

Montecados Payco. ,San Juan Ice cream McCjjnn-Erlckson. .San Juan 

Murdock Homes. Louisville Plywood homes M. R. Kopme.ver. I^uisvllle 

O'Brien's of ( jtlifomia. San Jose Candies Raymond R. Morgan. H'wood. 

Perma-Nall Co, Burbank, Calif Cosmetics William Kester, H'wood. 



(Please turn to page 72) 



r ""^ 





IT TAKES 
MORE THAN 



f 








(but which we have!) 

to dttrdct dnd hold 
dn dudience/ ' 



^2^v^«e/oiM coi/nmy^ii!^^ 



In Iowa, as in your own locality, people listen 
most to ,the station that gives them the best 
radio fare — regardless of signal strength, if 
"adequate." 

Each of the four Iowa counties featured at the 
right is fairly distant from Des Moines. Each 
has its own local radio station, giving an 
excellent signal in its own home region. And 
each is also served by many other stations, 
large and small. Yet the 1947 Iowa Radio 
Audience Survey discloses that, from 5:00 a.m. 
through 6:00 p.m., WHO's four -country average 
percentage of listening is 46.21 

There is only one answer to such listener- 
preference. That answer is Top-Notch Pro- 
gramming — Outstanding Public Service. Write 
for your copy of the 1947 Iowa Radio Audience 
Survey and see for vourself. 



FEBRUARY 1948 




WNO 

*for Iowa PLUS + 

DES MOINES . . . 50,000 \\ ATTS 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



11 



10,000 WATTS 




//»e ;9wing is toWB ii^K^nsasO,^ 



-^- 



* Area's highest Hooperated station 

ir Area's lowest cost per-thousand-listeners 

if Wide and wealthy consumer-market 

'k Beginning full-time operation 

(probably next month) with greater 
power and better frequency — 
10,000 watts on 710 kilocycles 

See your John Blair man for availabilities! 



10,000 WATTS IN KANS^ 

DON DAVIS 

f«f siof Nr ^ 

JOHN T. SCHILLING ^ 
. . ...iuitA™ 

JOHN BLAIR&CO. 
MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5,000 WATTS NIGHT 




r 40 West 52nil 1 

{Continued Jrom page 6) 

ANPA estimates that the average Amer- 
ican family spends $19.51 per year for 
newspapers, while the Magazine Ad- 
vertising Bureau gives an estimate of 
$10.96 per year for magazines. 

Perhaps some of your readers will find 
it a useful answer to a question which 
comes up from time to time. 

E. P. H. James 

Vp 

MBS, New York 



FOR THE RECORD 

Just so we can keep the records straight, 
I would like to correct the announcement 
of the Katz Agency that it is setting up 
the first television department in any 
firm of representatives. This, of course, 
is not the case, for Free and Peters has 
been active in this field now for over a 
year in the representation of KSD-TV. 
Just for your information, each of the 
Colonels is qualifying himself for all 
phases of television and has been doing 
so for man\' months. 

E. P. J. Shurick 
Free and Peters, Inc. 
New York. 



IS 



WEAK LINK 

The weakest link in the FM chain is 
the man who sells radios! 

Recently I made a survey of the radio 
retailers in this area in an attempt to 
find out how aggressively they are pushing 
the sale of FM receivers. I was amazed, 
and your readers will be too, to find out 
that radio retailers are doing nothing to 
encourage the growth of this superb new 
medium. In spite of the fact that in each 
store I entered I deliberately told the 
salesman that I wanted to buy an FM 
radio, I was cautioned aga nst it by 
virtually everyone. 

Nowhere was I given a demonstration 
of FM reception, although there is a 
full-time station in this vicinity. One 
salesman told me, "Why buy an FM 
radio, there are only nine FM stations in 
the country." More than once, I was 
told, "FM will cost you $100 extra, and 
it isn't worth it." 

You and I both know that this medium 
must be sold, and sets never will be sold 
with attitudes such as these which I found 
prevailing. It's vital that the industry 
re-examine the emphasis it has put on 
dealer education. 

Andrew Takas, 
Albany, N. Y. 

SPONSOR 



lit I ll¥Tft"lil1i I 



_-■'... ,. . :. I 



You have to 



Tyi^ 



Ji^oiitf 




We're speaking of SALES in New England 



There's gold 



«. 



\ '1 ii|( i//^/c-^ 



® 



in New England but it takes technique to dig 




S^ 






it out. Only through the Yankee Network and its 23 honne- 



town 



mil 



stations can you get at this (i;^ /sfij (§^^ 



rich nnarket. Only the Yankee Network actually gets into and 



thoroughly covers all the many trading ^ 



\\\\\\^;i_r-_ "" '^^ 



^ 



centers. 



Only the Yankee Network reaches 89.4% of New England radio honnes. 

Check today with your Petry man about availabilities 
In the four editions (8 A.M. - I P.M. - 6 P.M. - I I P.M.) 
of the Yankee Network's "News While It Is News." 



/icce^itcui^ C4, THE YANKEE NETWORK'S 'P<tu*tdaXuut 

The Yankee Network, Inc. 

N\.Qmber of the Mutual Broadcasting System 
21 BROOKLINE AVENUE, BOSTON 15, MASS. Represented Nationally by EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



/sTikK i *'¥i|!T*n "OnrriiBoKo 
»yliT nAJrtfiC". 'V'.r.i 



9 BIG COMMUNITIES IN 

A 1S-MILE RADIUS 

and scores of ofhers 

just beyond 



THE 



a 



}^ 



VOICE IS 

siRonc in 
RHODE ismnD 

YES, and in many adjacent Massa- 
chusetts communities as well. Here 
in one of the nation's richest, most 
closely-knit regions is exclusive 
American coverage at rates that 
make WFCI Rhode Island's best buy! 




5000 WATTS 
DAY & NIGHT 



WALLACE A. WALKER, Gen. Mgr. 

PROVIDENCE, The Sheroton-Biltmore 

PAWTUCKET, 450 Main St. 



Represenfofives; 

THE KATZ AGENCY 



(Sec "Return of the Amateur," SPONSOR, September 1947, 

P^^^ page 15.) Are "new" talent programs increasing? What hap- 

• k^P* pened to Adam Hats' "Big Break"? How's the Horace 
Heidt's "Philip Morris Night" talent search doing? 

As predicted in sponsok's report un amateur programs, The Big Break 
did not sell Adam Hats and was dropped at the end of the first 13-week 
period. The program received favorable newspaper reviews but just 
couldn't fight the weather which during the fall was not conducive to 
hat-buying. Sidney Florsheim,* Adam Hat advertising manager, was re- 
placed and even Maxwell L. Schultz, Adam president, stepped out and 
opened a business consultation service. The result of a broadcast pro- 
gram that dcx?sn't make the grade is all too often a gigantic corporate 
shake-up. Failure of The Big Break has deterred most sponsors from 
buying any of the new talent programs available. Horace Heidt, however, 
was able to sell his talent search idea to Philip Morris. It was originally 
scheduled to replace the Milton Berle program but Berle's ratings started 
going up and the sponsor kept Berle and bought a new spot for Heidt. 
Heidt's program travels from town to town and while it has received a 
bad trade press to date it's building audiences as it travels. 
* He's doing an outstanding job for Harry S. Goodman's special everd deparimenl 



p.s 



(See "Sports Sponsorship," SPONSOR, May 1947, page 37.) 
What is the trend in sports bankrolling? Who is buying? 
Is listening up or down? 



With night baseball becoming such an important factor in sports broad- 
casting, commercial sports have moved almost 80 per cent to independent 
stations which are not tied down by network commitments. The latter 
make it virtually impossible for a station to accept sports commercials, 
since, with the exception of prize fighting, sports tear program schedules 
apart. The big fights are still sponsored by Gillette and snared for them 
the highest Hooper of 1947 for a regularly-scheduled commercial, a 
41.5 for the broadcast of the Louis- Walcott fracas. Gillette spent $1,800,- 
000 on sports in 1947. 

In the Midwest, Goebel is due to be the biggest sports sponsor during 
the year to come. Atlantic Refining's 1948 broadcast schedule of baseball 
and football will be as big as its 1947 presentations and there is a good 
chance that the budget will be upF>ed in certain areas to provide for TV 
sports as well. 

Chesterfields have joined Old Golds in the baseball field, the former 
buying TV rights for Giants' games over the NBC five-station TV net- 
work. Ballantine (Beer and Ale) have bought the Yankee games over the 
DuMont network (two stations). The Dodger games iBrcwklyn) over 
WGBS-TV and the CBS-TV network are sold but details are not available. 
Individual television stations not yet linked with the webs also have 
lined up sponsors for their local teams as sports continue to lead all polls 
on TV viewing popularity. 

Beer, cigarettes, oil and gas, in that order, will be the underwriters of 
local sports on the air in 1948. 



p.s. 



(Sec "Sans Advertising," SPONSOR, May 1947, page 31.) 
Will Goodyear continue to sponsor "The Greatest Story Ever 
Told"? Is the broadcast still doing a selling and public relations 
iob without advertising copy on the air? 



Goodyear Tire and Rubber considers the renewal of The Greatest Story 
every 13 weeks, but this is no indication that they aren't satisfied with the 
results of this program which is the only one on the air without direct or 
institutional advertising. Business conditions in the rubber industry are 
such that the responsible financial heads of Goodyear aren't making long- 
term commitments. Another reason why rumor stated that Goodyear is 
dropping the program is the energy with which certain church groups are 
pushing the program "to save it from going off the air." The church 
activity on behalf of the program was desired by the sponsor but not the 
possible interpretation which some place upon it. 
(Please turn to page 16) 



14 



SPONSOR 



■■ ■ '■■■-■^'■- 



KlAf 1/ U 
WW f\ ri No. 1 BUY 



IN THE $1-000.000,000 ARK-LA-TEX 



U UhMimm Mh 



(At no extra cost to you)* 



"h 10,000 inches of merchandising advertising a year in the largest 
newspaper in the tri-state area. 



+ READER half page in the Sunday edition of the finest newspaper 
in the Ark-La-Tex ... a reader page, informative and entertaining. 



+ DEALER LETTEIRS to thousands of druggists, grocers and jobbers 
throughout this rich area to support your radio advertising. 



+ HOUSE ORGAN distributed to dentists, physicians, druggists, 
grocers and libraries within the forty-nine counties and parishes of 
the Ark-La-Tex. 



+ YOUR PERSONAL AMBASSADORS -KWKH Artists in 1947 played 
in more than 350 cities throughout North Louisiana, East Texas, and 
South Arkansas, building audiences for your message. 





There are seven other radio stations in the Ark-La-Tex area ... By 
using all of them they do not quite cover the rich primary (50%) area 
of 50,000 Watt KWKH ... the station heard by most . . . preferred 
by most— ALL THE TIME. 



*Remember this huge plui 
list starts with the sale — 
at no extra cost to you. 



FEBRUARY 1948 



15 




CHANNEL 




ASK YOUR 

WAAT MAN 

ABOUT 

WATV 



SERVING NEW 
JERSEY AND 

METROPOLITAN 
NEW YORK! 




|l*^* (Continued from page 14) 

Rural sales, a basic reason for sponsoring the program, continue up for 
Goodyear. Even if this were not so, the operating executives of the com- 
pany are 100 per cent behind Chairman cf the Board P. W. Litchfield, 
whose baby the program is. 

The annual report of the Goodyear company indicates that 1947 was 
its biggest peacetime year. While virtually all branches of the company's 
manufacturing activities made more money in 1947, sales of tractor tires 
and other farm rubber equipment showed an extra substantial improve- 
ment during the year. 

A recent survey made for Goodyear by its agency fKudnerl and ABC 
indicated that among listeners the program as it is is tops. Eighty per 
cent of those queried by mail returned their questionnaires, fantastic 
response to a mail survey. Eighty-two per cent of the respondents 
wanted the program just as it is, on Sundays at 6:30. 

The Greatest Story Ever Told is still the ideal example of making the 
program instead of commercials carry the advertising burden. 



P 



(See "Road to Results," SPONSOR, May 1947, pase 17.) 

SWhat is the status o( prosram traveling? What new sponsors are 
9 sending their shows on the road? What are traveling conditions 
For the troupes? 



All the programs which traveled during the 1946 47 season and were 
sponsored during the fall of 1947 traveled again. A number, like U. S. 
Steel's Theatre Guild of the Air, extended their peregrinations. The 
Aldrich Family, whose roots have been very definitely in New York and 
whose first out-of-town airing originated in Chicago last year for the 
March of Dimes, will travel as often as possible this season. The first 
trip is to Rochester for the opening of WHAM's Radio City studios. 

With General Electric's return to the sponsorship of House Party 
(CBS) this Art Linkletter show's contract calls for three months of touring 
this spring. Brown and Williamson are considering traveling People Are 
Funny, since Art Linkletter, its mc, will be on the road for House Party. 

Toni decided in December that one out of four broadcasts of its Give 
and Take would be made out-of-town and has adopted the same schedule 
for Ladies Be Seated. Ladies has traveled before but not on a regular 
schedule and not as frequently. 

To give Lum 'n' Abner new life. Miles laboratories is traveling this 
daily program. Shotwell Manufacturing, which has just bought True or 
False, will travel it. Burl Ives, who was heard transcribed on the .Mutual 
network for Philco before the Petrillo ban on recordings, naturally will 
now have to originate his programs on the road as he is booked for concert 
dates all over the country. 

First of the "talent hunt" programs to hit the road is the Horace 
Heidt Philip Morris Sunday night program. In the past talent searches 
have been conducted throughout the U. S., one town at a time, and the 
top talent brought into New York or Hollywood for the broadcast. 
Heidt travels his search and takes the winner from one town along with 
him to compete with the talent from the next town and so on. Thus he 
is getting the impact of being in one town and having the listeners from 
the last town keyed up to see if their winner can stand up against current 
competition. One winner stayed with the show for five broadcasts. 

There are more "causes" to travel for in 1947-1948. Whereas the 
March of Dimes was something special and Edgar Bergen, Bob Hope, 
and other stars did special appearances for the FDR charity, now the 
Damon Runyon Fund (cancer) and the Cardiac Foundation (heart 
trouble) are two added causes which are justifying program travel. 

Casts of traveling programs report that while recent storms disturbed 
travel arrangements during December and January, general road con- 
ditions are better, hotel accommodations are easier, and despite the high 
cost of food there is plenty of it. 

The road is still the path to better results from broadcast advertising. 



16 



SPONSOR 



-jg^ 



rii^^^la^^r^*^ 




I'M WORTH A COOL 



50,000 WATTS 

BASIC CBS 
CLEVELAND 




ee Billion 

in effective buying income 



You're face to face right now with one of the 
two and a half million people who live in the area 
covered by WGAR's 50,000 watts power. 

Proud? Sure they are. And why not? Their effective 
buying income is more than three billion dollars! 
They are alive to what's going on, active in their 
reactions, quick to do something about it. 

Your advertising message will bring rich 

returns when it reaches this audience . . . 

an audience earning enough and yearning 

enough to want the things you are selling . . . 

an audience most economically and effectively 

covered by WGAR, the station which reaches 

40% of Ohio's buying power. 




V,*^. 






^^-3 



^---> 




MOST POWERFUL SIGNAL OF ANY CLEVELAND STATION In Cleveland ...in Akron ...in Canton 



Representee/ Nationally hy EDWARD PETRY & COMPANY 




FEBRUARY 1948 



17 




HAVE YOU HEARD 
THE ONE ABOUT THE 
38 EAGER BEAVERS? 




Once there were 38 
vers — (that's us) — 
eager as the dickens to 
start a Problem-Solving 
Service for overworked 
tiniehuyers and Ilooper- 
niinded advertisers. 

We had the experience — 
47 years of it — on na- 
tional networks, major 
stations and in 4-A ad 
agencies, lint no station. 




4. None of this hit-or-raiss, take- 
it-or-leave-it stuff. WVET i.s 
staffed and etjuipped to give you 
y^i Complete .\dvertising and Mer- 
// chandising Service-of-the-Air — 
from trouble-shooting and testing 
shows to giving you expert, on- 
the-spot help with local distribu- 
— tioii ])roblems. 



'■Z. . Doleful Donalds and 
Pooh -Poo hers said we 
couldn't do it; they said we 
couldn't even get in the 
fight for Rochester's new 
.3000 watt station. HUT 
WE DID. And won. In 
just 18 months, from start 
to finish. And now we're 
out to win some major sales 
battles for VOU. 




le lieart of the radio 
IwvetT 




^_, 



3. WVET's strategy: ACTION, 
not excuses. RESULTS, not 
promises. SERVICE, not boon- 
doggling. And bv service, we 
mean PERSONALIZED 
service — based on your 
product, your problems 
and competition, your 
markets, your sales ob- 
jectives! 



5. Still another big competitive advantage for you 

—WVET is the ONLY Rochester station with a 

New York office! 
I ' And it's right smack in ll 

"empire": (1) to make 

sure we hear about new 

developments FIRST so we 

can pass them on to you 
^•^ while they are new, (2) to 
^ help WVET advertisers out- 
scoop local competition ! (3) 

to bring you the best in 

talent, programming and 

other d o 1 1 a r - m a k i n g 

"pluses." 



6. So if it's plain old-fashioned get-up-and-go you 
want — {wid plenty of action — hurry and write us for 
full details on WVET — Rochester's 
new lite-wire, iip-and-at-'em station! 



VETERANS BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 
204 GRANITE BLDG.. ROCHESTER 4. NEW YORK 





WVET 



ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 

BASIC MUTUAL STATION 
5000 WATTS 1280 KC 

NATIONALLY REPRESENTED BY WEED AND 



18 



COM PAN Y 



SPONSOR 



^a_s. 




i nieilandisiii 



Sixty-three thousand, Five hundred fifty-six 
labels for Christmas presents were sent by liS' 
teners to station KMMJ, Grand Island, 
Nebraska. The sponsor put a few cents 
in a holiday kitty for each label of his 
coffee to give orphans gifts at yuletide. 

One hundred tickets to theater TV were of' 
fered by disk jockey Al Jarvis on his 
KLAC record spinnings. Would-be ticket 
getters had to show up at the Los Angeles 
Sentinel office with a picture of George 
Washington Carver. Over 500 showed. 
The presentation of theater-size television 
was an experiment and Jarvis promotion 
of it produced turn-away business in addi- 
tion to the 500 free-ticket applicants. 

Public opinion poll via ABC's "Welcome 
Traveler" is receiving nation-wide pub- 
licity since more than 40 states are repre- 
sented on the average broadcast. A 
different question is asked each week of 
the traveling audience which is passing 
through Chicago 

KMPC's drive for radios and records for hos- 
pitalized veterans produced TV sets and 
juke boxes as well. Riding a cause 
helped the station help hospitals through- 
out southern California. Contributions 
from 109 communities — 5,200 individuals 
— included 75,000 disks, 250 record 
players, and hundreds of bedside radios. 

Top Ten Records actually promote commercial 
programs since all the air advertising for 
their albums use excerpts from disks in- 
cluded in the collection. Albums hold 
some of the best routines of each of the 
stars albumized. Currently being pushed 
is the Ed Gardner (Archie) collection. 

Colorado proclaimed January 16 Jack Benny 
Day in honor of the comedian's visit to 
the state for a March of Dimes appear- 
ance. Benny spent the week in the state 
and seats for the broadcast over KOA 
sold from $500 down. 

A sponsor on the air continuously for 16 years 
received a plaque from KLAC of Nash- 
ville, Tenn. Nashville's Paramount, the 
first motion picture theater in the city to 
buy time, has done so from the day it 
opened. 

WKRC's "Key Notes," a monthly listener 
promotion, reached its 1,000,000th copy in 
January. Its first month's (August 1946) 
circulation was 5,000 and it has now 

FEBRUARY 1948 



zoomed to 85,000 per month, distributed 
by 2,200 food and diug stores. 

Duke Ellington joined Tommy Dorsey for a 
two-hour joint session in order to get across 
to the trade and consumer press that 
both were disk jockeying over WMCA. 
Duke fingered the keyboard. Tommy 
wise-cracked, and the listeners had a 
show that helped the sponsors of both the 
Ellington and Dorsey programs. 

A shift of sponsors was made a gala event 
at KSFO (S. F.) recently when Hale 
Bros.' department store dropped its five- 
year sponsorship of the Hour of Melody. 
The station sold it at once to J. E. French 
Company, Dodge and Plymouth dealers. 
The party got both sponsors and stations 
a nice press. 

Talent fan booklets are still tops with stations 
that feature hillbilly programs. Snuffy's 
Scrapbook, 1948 is a popular give-away 
over WIS. Two sponsors of the WIS 
Hillbillies, Cate-McLaurin and Geiger 
Flour, get credit on the book, which is set 
up as an old-fashioned photograph album. 

Contests do not always have to offer awards. 
Ralph Edwards, whose "Walking Man" 
and "Miss Hush" contests have given 
away practically the world with a fence 
around it, also proved this recently when 
he asked, ust before the holiday season, 
what his listeners wanted most for 
Christmas. The winning gift was Peace — 
which was no surprise, but the fact that 
there were over 76,000 entries was. 

' 'Big Story" promotes one town at a time al- 
though it's a coast-to-coaster. One news- 
paperman in a town is saluted because of 
outstanding work in breaking a "big 
story." Foote, Cone & Belding, the 
agency, promotes the program as a good- 
will offering to the press on the part of its 
sponsor, American Tobacco, and the net- 
work (NBC). 

The year's first baby born in Hartford County, 
Conn., was not only presented on the air 
by station WKNB of New Britain, but 
was also presented with $275 in gifts to 
start it off radio-right. 

Maxwell Kelch, owner of KENO, Las Vegas, 
spearheads courtesy campaign. Kelch heads 
the Chamber of Commerce promotion 
committee and has signs with a smiling 

{Please turn to page 70) 



DAMS 

AFFECT 

MARKET 



TVA's great new 
dams — Holston and 
Watauga are one 
more reason why 
people in the John- 
son City market 
area have the high- 
est per capita in- 
come of any group 
in the South. 

And WJHL gives top 
coverage of this rich 
sales area. For 
WJHL is the most 
listened to station 
in 10 of its 32 BMB 
counties, totaling 
85,020 BMB radio 
families. Check 
WJHL now! 

ONLY ABC OUTLET 
COVERING THE NORTH- 
EAST TENNESSEE MARKET 




5,000 W 910 KC 

JOHNSON CITY, TENNESSEE 

Nat. Rep. John E. Pearson Co. 



19 



Remember the 
story about . . . 




the caterpillar. . 



227 ^'^. 




that grew . . . 




into a butterfly . . . 

A beautiful butterfly, too! A 
colorful, sweeping thing. And 
once again we're going to have 
to tell you . . . that's pretty much 
the story of W-W-D-C. W-W-D-C 
started as on idea. A little idea 
that grew. As it developed 
under the warm rays of sales 
producing, it started to fly. 
Colorfully, too! Today in Wash- 
ington, if you want to do a 
sales job at low cost, use the 
station people look to . . . 1450 
on the AM dial . . . 101.1 on the 
FM dial. That's the way to fly! 



Only one other station in 

Washington has more 

loyal listeners 

WWDC 

AMFM-Ihe D. C. Independent 

Reprettnted Nationally by 

FORJOE & COMPANY 



Mr. Sponsor: 





•lanios II. CariiiiiK^^' 



Vp In Charse of Distribution, Phiico Corp. 

Jimmy Carmine's great delight in breaking the conventional 
rules of radio advertising is equalled only by his uncanny 
ability to get Phiico products sold. Despite his fancy, recently- 
acquired title, he's basically a promotion man. It was show- 
manship, plus pressure promotion to dealers and distributors, 
that resulted in 1947's sales record for Phiico of over $300,000,000. 
To maintain this pace. Carmine today is spending an advertising 
budget of some $3,500,000 — triple what he was spending five 
years ago. Broadcasting gets the lion's share, with at least 70 per 
cent going into three air shows, Bing Crosby and Breakfast Club 
on ABC, Burl Ives on Mutual. 

The Crosby e.t. show broke precedents . . . but it also made a 
major contribution to Philco's new sales record. After the first 
four airings (1946), Phiico dealers sold out of the radio-phono 
model that Der Bingle was plugging. More important to 
Carmine, now in his twenty-fifth year for Phiico, the program 
lined up dealer and distributor advertising dollars solidly behind 
Philco's over-all spending. Carmine woiks closely with his 
dealers, large or small. 

Carmine has learned a lot about broadcast advertising in the 
past five years, since Phiico has gone in for a succession of major 
network programs. He has even set up (through Philco's battery 
division) a personal rating service which measures power con- 
sumption ir key cities while Crosby is on the air. Although he 
gets tough when he thinks a show is not doing a job, he's inter- 
ested not in ratings but in the program appeal. Jimmy Carmine 
wants to be certain that he reaches, as he terms it, a "pre- 
selected, pre-sold, pre-mood-conscious audience . . . with money 
ready in its pockets." 

*//. ri)Tsim'\tat>r.':. r.p of llulchitis Adufrluing and Murk WiMxis. presitirnl nj AHC. tmlch 
.lintmv l.iirinine sum """ /'i"!/ Crosby AliC eanlracl. 



20 



SPONSOR 



MfiS 



ritt^y^ki 



(japitoi'i 



f TRANSCRIPTION 
LIBRARY SERVICE 

pays off 

FOR STATION 

BR iRk Wm iHw mm 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 





Lots more listeners in Louisville ore dialing WKYW these days . . . thanks 
to Capitol's Transcription Library Service. Look at the success of just two of 
the shows built with Capitol Transcriptions; 

HAL DERWIN SHOW— now in second place among five stations, including 
three networks . . . and with a Hooper of 3.4! (It's logged in mid-morning, 
too, ofter a program with a much lower rating.) 

"WESTERN TRAILS," featuring Capitol's great western and folk talent- 
leads all but one big-network show! 

Is WKYW happy? They sure are . . . CAPITOL Happy! 



pay off 

FOR YOU, TOOlC^ 




WKYW has boosted listener levels with Capitol Transcriptions . . . and 
so con yoo.' Capitol gives you every imaginable aid: 1. Completely flexible 
themes and dated formats for 30 hours of entertainment each week — so 
that you can quickly tailor-make a show for any sponsor. 2. Dozens of 
big-name stars — in every category of musical entertainment. 3. Special 
musical themes for your shows. 4. Musical interludes. 5. Artists' voice tracks 
for "live" show effect. 6. Unparalleled technical quality. 



A matchless combination for lur- 
ing new listeners and sponsors 
. . . and the coupon is your ticket 
to a free hearing. Use it today! 



Sunse* and Vine 










/te 


e 


demonstration | 


Capitol Tronsc 
Suniet A Vine 
Hollywood 38. 


iptions 
California 




V 






transcription j 


Please send 


me without cost . . 












1. Demonstration Transcription 
7. Complete details about the 


— to sh 
Library 


ow me what 
Service and 


moket Copiloi'i Service differenf. [ 
ti cojtt. 1 


Nnm* 












1 


1 
Pn.ilinn | 




Srr««t and No 











































FEBRUARY 1948 



21 




Jll^/-^ 




IllHf" 



''ill:)"-""" 




-C.nS^'^ 




There*s a lot more to it than this.. 



In every business friendly personal relationships are a big help. 
But that's only the beginning of the story . . . there's a lot more to it. 

You've probably noticed that the people who are most welcome 
in your own office are those who never waste your time . . . 
who talk your business and know what they're talking about. 
Weed and Company representatives are like that. 

They sell a very good product— Spot Radio— one of the 
most precise and most profitable forms of modern advertising. 
They sell it right— for what it can do for yon. 

Behind their ability are a number of qualities: experience, 
associations, persistence. Even more fundamental, perhaps, 
are plain hard work and the ex{:)ert knowledge it gives. 
For these are the two factors that produce most of the results 
most of the time . . . the two factors that make 
Weed & Company service so valuable to any advertiser. 



Weed 



radio station representatives 



a n 



d 



newyork • boston • Chicago • detroit 
C O in T33.Il.y sanfrancisco • atlanta • Hollywood 



SS 



SPONSOR 



.^n^ 



Oti 



'^•' '• ' ■• 



Press ilgente 



Public relations 
is insurance for 
programs anil talent 



There are few accidents in 
publicity. 

Over 150 independent press agents do 
their best to make sure that everything 
appearing in print about their clients 
looks like real news. 

The gross income of an independent 
radio press agent runs from over a half 
million (Earle Ferris) to under $7,500 for 
ex-news men out of a regular job who 
operate off the cuff or out of the office of 
their clients or the networks. 

These men and women, located for the 
most part in New York, Hollywood, and 
Chicago (important factors have offices in 
all three cities), supplement the publicity 
efforts of stations, networks, advertising 
agencies, and sponsors. Although pub' 
licity departments in these organizations 
are very volatile, conservative estimates 
place the number of full-fledged public re- 
lations men and women in these four seg- 
ments of broadcast advertising at over 
3,000. This includes some press agents 
who give only part of their time to broad- 
cast publicity but does not include the 
countless secretaries, mail clerks, and 
other office personnel who spend a good 
portion of their work day handling pub- 
licity details. 

Of the over $45,000,000 spent by the 
radio industry, agencies, and spxjnsors for 
broadcast public relations, the independ- 
ent publicity man gets only $3,750,000, 
and a goodly part of this goes to Uncle 
Sam for postage. Earle Ferris, Dave 
Alber, and George Lilley get out mailings 



Press Agent Edith Allen (Carl Byoir) was 
heavy laden with props when Look's camera 
man caught her as she was hailing a taxi 



FEBRUARY 1948 





stiiiit$>i: 



Steve Hannagan took editors on a boat 
ride to make sure they met Dick Haymes 



Pianist List presented Truman with 
music before an air guest appearance 



James Melton's helicopter trip for 
hearsal vsas a Fred Coll publicity Ljir 



that run into the thousands of pieces each 
week and other press agents (who do not 
attempt to blanket the nation's press or 
who use mailing services such as Gilliams 
Service or Nu Method Matrix and Plate 
Service) also add to the flood of waste- 
basket fodder handled daily by the men 
in grey. 

Publicity men exist on a result basis — 
they must deliver (week after week) circu- 
lation that justifies their stipends. When 
a poll is held they fight for that first-place 
position — the first-place winner each year 
can trace direct business to this blue rib' 
bon. Coll and Freedman have won the 
Billboard poll for the past two years, 
Dave Alber won for two years, and most of 
the rest of the years Earle Ferris has had 
a lease on the votes of the radio editors. 

Earle Ferris has built up his operation 
by working (in radio) only for advertising 
agencies. He claims that he won't take a 
radio account direct, although he handles 
the publicity through Leonard Traube for 
Fred Ziv's transcription organization. He 



claims that his minimum publicity fee is 
$250 a week and that it costs him almost 
that for his mailings on each account. He 
does mailing alone for agency clients at 
$150 a week and states that this is his 
lowest fee, denying statements by some 
other publicity men that he has some 
accounts at as little as $35. 

One of Ferris' sizable accounts is the 
William Esty agency which pays him 
nearly $100,000 a year to handle their six 
programs. Tom Luckenbill, radio vp of 
the agency, claims Ferris' annual bill is 
much less than this. 

Over 60 per cent of all shows on the net- 
works have at least one independent press 
agent working on their programs. The 
p. a. may work for the advertising agency, 
the sponsor, the package producer, or an 
individual star on the program. Where 
there are a number of stars there may be a 
number of press agents each pushing for 
his own personality. American Tobacco's 
your Hit Parade may have George Evans 
publicizing Frank Sinatra, Wayne Var- 



num working for Beryl Davis, as well as 
George Wolf of Foote, Cone & Belding, 
the advertising agency on the account, all 
fighting for space for Parade. Evans is 
more a night-club press agent than a radio 
publicist. Varnum is ex-Columbia Rec- 
ords, but is specializing in radio now and 
is responsible for one of the most amazing 
two-page radio talent pictures that Life 
has ever run^presenting the number of 
people Cover 100) who contributed to 
helping Beryl Davis make the star grade. 
George Wolf was formerly with NBC's 
publicity department. 

The fact that an advertising agency or 
a sponsor has a publicity director does not 
mean that an independent press agent 
isn't hired for radio publicity. Agencies 
and sponsors with publicity departments 
are more apt to employ outside counsel 
and or actual public relations services 
than those without departments. Even 
the biggest departments in agencies 
(BBD&O and J. Walter Thompson) use 
outside services. For instance, although 



liolidavs: 



Bergen and McCarthy celebrate Thanksgiving,- Btrle is delivered for Christmas; New Year pose; Betty Gerson as a valcnt 




Igl^^US^Mtm 



ttM^iiiiiiiiii 




\ 




3' erspy's war trophy campaign was Jack Benny accompanies Phil Baker in a 
Md by Phil Lord's p. a. Saul Krieg typical two-artist publicity picture 



Script writers Find a worthy cause a good way to snare press recogni- 
tion. Paul Miltcn staged a circus for underprivileged children 



Hal Davis (Kenyon & Eckhardt) is re- 
puted to be one of the best idea men in 
radio publicity, he nevertheless pays 
Arthur Miller, formerly with CBS pub' 
licity, for magazine placements on a regu- 
lar retainer basis. 

Although the radio field is most con- 
scious of its independent press agents, 
most of the larger public opinion coun- 
sellors have staff members who know 
radio and its problems. Steve Hannagan 
has Don Walsh (once Variety). Carl 
Byoir has Bob Davis (formerly NBC and 
WOR). Russell Birdwell, Ivy Lee and 
T. J. Ross, Ames and Norr, Ben Sonnen- 
berg, Fred Eldean, Edward L. Bemays, 
all employ specialists in broadcast public 
relations even when they do not have a 
program or sponsor to handle. Sponsors, 
many of them with million dollar appro- 
priations, call upon their outside publicity 
men for advice, even if they do not use 
them actively to promote their programs. 
This is true also of the networks. Typi- 
cally, Lee and Ross is retained by CBS, 



Ames and Norr by NBC. Top-rank 
talent also employs special counsel besides 
a regular independent press agent. Thus 
although Kate Smith has employed Dave 
Alber for the past six years as her press 
agent, her manager, Ted Collins, has 
Russell Birdwell sit in when an important 
policy matter comes up for consideration. 
The Bennys, Crosbys, and Hopes, when 
the chips are down, hedge their decisions 
with advice from a top ganger of public 
opinion. 

The hardest workers for radio programs 
and talent in newspaper and magazine 
space-getting are Dave Alber and Coll and 
Freedman. The former has 12 radio 
clients, the latter nine. Alber's showcase 
accounts are Truth or Consequences and 
Kate Smith. Fred Coll and Zac Freed- 
man in their presentations polish up Vox 
Pop and Harvest of Stars. Alber has the 
reputation of milking every idea for its 
last line. He seldom misses a bet in 
getting his clients' names in print. When 



Margaret Truman appeared with the 
Detroit Symphony, the wire stories (AP, 
UP, INS) carried congratulatory com- 
ments from many figures in the musical 
world. All of Alber's musical clients were 
represented. What pxjinted up Alber's 
quick thinking in this case was the fact 
that Hal Davis, who handled the event 
for Kenyon & Eckhardt and the White 
House, hadn't thought of having his own 
clients climb on the bandwagon. Davis 
doesn't miss much. 

Most thorough in its coverage, by repu- 
tation, is the Ferris office, whose mailings, 
mat and wire services, blanket the na- 
tion's newspapers. Ferris' services run 
the gamut, his copy is good. His reputa- 
tion is tops as a follow-through man. He 
bases his presentations to prospective 
clients on a circulation basis and "says it 
with clippings." Ferris, like Alber, gets a 
good deal of his acceptance from feeding 
radio editors with news about personali- 
ties whether or not they're his clients. 
He's proud that every so often he scoops 



alei»arnay pays tribute to Washington; Virginia Verrill, Easter bunny; Jane Wilson does her Independence Day bit; Charles Irving looks like a pumpkin 







the trade press on news for his mailing 
list. 

Independent press agents feed their 
outlets news in order to obtain space for 
their clients. It's said that the Winchell 
ratio is three exclusive news tips for one 
plug and that to a lesser degree this goes 
for Walker, Sullivan, Sobol, Kilgallen, 
Hopper, Wilson, and Lyons, all of whose 
columns run in hundreds of newspapers. 
Most of the major independent press 
agents have men who make it their busi- 
ness to feed material to the columns. The 
networks have column men also but 
"policy" ties their hands a great deal 
more than it binds the operations on the 
unaffiliated space grabbers. Corporate 
publicity executives also look upon men- 
tion in these columns as invaluable but 
their hands are even more tightly 
shackled. 

Rated tops among the general press 
agents who handle radio publicity as part 
of the job they do for their clients is Steve 
Hannagan. Hannagan handled Jack 
Benny after the latter left General Foods 
because he felt he was losing his audience 
due to bad public relations. Hannagan 
says that he took the Benny account 
because of his personal friendship for the 
star. (He does not accept the radio part 



of a publicity account for any corporation 
— it's all, he explains, or nothing.) His 
office is said to have started Benny's re- 
climb to, top rating. Hannagan handles 
the Ccca-Cola account, for which his 
budget was recently upped 50 per cent to 
over $100,000 for the current fiscal year. He 
also handles the Electric Auto-Lite ac- 
count. For Coke he publicizes its four 
programs. Pause That Refreshes on the 
Air, Sf)otlight Revue, Morton Downey, 
and Claudia and David. For Auto-Lite he 
brings the news of Dick Haymes to the 
press. Both sponsors are conservative 
organizations and Hannagan does a rou- 
tine radio publicity job for them. 

Ben Sonnenberg, the Park Avenue p.a., 
also handles chiefly complete accounts. 
However, he does radio press-agentry (he 
doesn't like the term) for the Bob Hope 
Show and Amos 'n' Andy, both for Lever 
Brothers. Mack Millar on the West 
Coast handles publicity for Hope and also 
does the press relations for Eddie Cantor. 

Publicity insurance for stars and fea- 
tured name players usually costs about 
10 per cent of the talent's weekly stipend. 
A star may not need a press agent while he 
or she is at the top of the heap but the 
trouble is that stars don't stay at the top 
without guided publicity. On the same 



basis commercial radio programs require 
special public relations but the cost to 
them shouldn't come anywhere near 10 
per cent of the program cost except in the 
case of low-fee programs. An independ- 
ent press agent ought to cost (for services 
and expense account) about 5 per cent for 
programs that cost under $5,000, down to 
3 per cent for programs over $10,000. 
The top-bracket programs (over $20,000) 
frequently are called upon to spend more 
percentagewise than lower-cost presenta- 
tions. They are expected to deliver more 
listeners and are thus more vulnerable, 
i.e., require more publicity insurance. 
When Jack Benny moved to American 
Tobacco sponsorship it was announced 
that his contract carried a clause which 
committed ATC to spend $5,000 a week 
($250,000 per year) for publicity, over and 
above the cost of the Benny package. It 
was at this time that Hannagan handled 
Benny. When ATC, upon the renewal of 
Benny's contract, dropped this part of the 
agreement, Hannagan also stepped out. 
Now the program's publicity, aside from 
what is done by Foote, Cone and Belding's 
public relations department and NBC, is 
handled by Irving A. Fein, who does pub- 
licity for Benny's Amusement Corpora- 
{Please turn to page 90) 



Wayne Varnum had this blueprint when he set out to sell over 100 personalities on cooperating in a picture spread For singer Beryl Davis 

T 




S6 



SPONSOR 



i^HAi 



^^ 




Direct sales prove 



effectiveness of 



i»roa€lcasts of Beiiiiix at i%ork 



Contest for a silver and gold 
plated Bendix washer was an 
added "Wash on the Air" at- 
traction by a Ft. Worth dealer 



WIN The Beautiful 
Replica of the 'Millionth' 

Bendix Washer 

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WINNER will be announced 
November Ist. over WBAP 

Broadcast Direct From 

VERGAL BOURLAND.Homt AppBaDcts 
270S Wtst Scvendi 



1:45 UNTIL 2:00 
SATURDAY APTERNOON 



lot 



ntf-m 



tu^^^'' "Wash on the Air" 

YOUIL er A IAN6 OUT Of THE SHOW 
AND WHO KNOWS-YOU MAY WIN I 



©Although using no air time it- 
self, Bendix Home Appliances, 
Inc., has sold more washing 
machines directly through broadcasting 
during the last four months of 1947 than 
through any other medium. So successful 
has the Bendix Wash on the Air broadcast 
formula become that what was a spot-by- 
spot operation will now become national. 

Bendix is one of the few manufacturers 
who have found cooperative advertising 
(where dealer, distributor, and the na- 
tional organization share costs) more pro- 
ductive than national advertising. While 
Bendix was spending $1,000,000 in maga- 
zines it was spending $812,500 in coopera- 
tive advertising, which sum was matched 
by dealers and doubled by distributor ex- 
penditures so that a total of $3,250,000 
was spent in advertising to sell Bendix 
home appliances locally. 

Through a one-time broadcast over 
KFOR the Hardy Furniture Company, 
Bendix dealer in Lincoln, Nebraska, sold 
13 washers and out of an attendance of 
115 at the broadcast developed an addi- 
tional 30 prospects. While this is a 
better-than-average sales result it is not 
startling to Bendix for they have seen in 
the little town of Enid, Oklahoma, a Wash 
on the Air program over KCRC bring in 
48 for the demonstration-broadcast, of 
which 10 placed orders on the spot 
($2,590 in direct sales). The entire other 
38 listed themselves as prospects. Enid 
has a population of 7,860 families, 7,250 
radio homes. 



A Bendix washer is a major appliance 
purchase by any family. Its cost places 
it in competition with the possible pur- 
chase of a car. Many families have stated 
in surveys conducted by appliance manu- 
facturers that they would have to decide 
between a new car and an automatic 
washer as both couldn't fit in their budg- 
ets during any one two-year period. The 
fact that a single 15-minute broadcast, 
even if it is given the maximum in show- 
manship, can deliver direct sales as well as 
prospects is a tribute to the new approach 
developed by Bendix — an actual product 
demonstration via the air waves. 

The idea for this formula was conceived 
by Bill Simmons, a one-time radio an- 
nouncer, who at the time he thought of 
the plan was Bendix sales manager for 
Southern Appliances, Inc., of Charlotte, 
N. C. He sold the idea to home office 
officials and the traveling team (an- 
nouncer and promotion man) idea which 
ran all the Wash on the Air broadcasts in 
1947 was inaugurated in Texas and pre- 
sented the program in from three to five 
towns per week. 

The team really takes over the town 
when it moves in. Stores display big 
signs featuring the broadcast demonstra- 
tion. Teaser announcements are broad- 
cast. Newspaper advertisements featur- 
ing the broadcast are run — and when 
possible, "name" guests of honor are 
snared as extra added attractions. In 
Lawton, Oklahoma, Mayor George 
Hutchins removed his shirt and had it 



FEBRUARY 1948 



87 




F«mily laundry is actually washed during broadcast demonstration 



washed and ironed right before the 
microphone. 1 1 made the first page of the 
local newspapers — with Bendix publicity 
and a bow to the Mayor for being "a 
regular guy." 

The formula is so set now that in its 
national application there won't be a 
home office traveling team. Future 
broadcasts will be handled by a station 
announcer and a distributor promotion 
man instead of a Bendix announcer (Jack 
Knott "i and a Bendix staff man. 

Instead of the team there is a multiple- 
page, three-pocket step-by-step brochure 
which makes the Wash on the Air program 
as foolproof as it's possible to make any 
broadcast show on a blueprint. 

The cost of each promotion during the 
trial run period (1947) was $100. During 
1948 it will be slightly higher since in 1947 
the team (announcer and promotion man) 
were on home office payroll and not 
charged against the broadcasts. In 1948 
the announcer will be paid as part of each 
promotion while the distributor will 
supply the promotion man. 

Like all one-time broadcasts, the degree 
of success of Wash on the Air depends 
upon how much promotion is put behind 
it. Most dealers use Bendix spots regu- 
larly and turn them on the one-time Wash 
when it's scheduled. Everything from 



S8 




"woman in the store" interviews to wash 
quizzes are planned. In Fort Worth 
(WBAP), Virgil Bourland, Bendix dealer, 
gave away a full size gold-and-silver- 
plated Bendix automatic, an exact copy of 
the millionth Bendix washer produced. 
All the listeners to his Wash on the Air 
broadcast had to do was to complete in 49 
words or less the statement, "I would like 
to owTi a Bendix because ..." There 
were 570 entries. 

The home of the winner now is practi- 
cally a Bendix showroom since everyone in 
her neighborhood — and many who live 
quite some distance from the area — come 
to see what a gold-and-silver-plated 
Bendix looks like. Hundreds also came 
to the store to sec the washer before it 
was presented. 

While the Bendix automatic washing 
machine seems like a one-product sale, it 
isn't. Wash on the Air is conceived to sell 
the washer, yet it also exposes all who 
come to the dealer's store for the broad- 
cast to the Bendix ironer and dryer. In 
Mason Cit>', Iowa, the broadcast directly 
produced sales of four washers, four 
ironers, and three dryers, which explains 
why dealers are willing to put their own 
money back of a Bendix promotion 
broadcast. The Bendix washer sale not 
only is profitable (the mark-up runs from 



33} 3 to 40 per cent depending upon the 
size of the dealer's order) but the washer is 
only the first sale. In over 20 per cent of 
washer sales the dealer is able to sell an 
ironer or dryer later. It's too early in the 
Wash on the Air campaign to obtain final 
figures on follow-up sales but the fact that 
the 20 per cent figure is quoted now is 
some indication of how far this business 
may develop. 

Bendix is comparatively new in the 
home appliance field, compared to May- 
tag, Westinghouse, General Electric, and 
many other old-line companies. The 
entire industry produced 3,698,000 stand- 
ard-size washers in 1947. Bendix pro- 
duced 602,000. and was first in unit sales 
and billing in the field. 

Bendix, merchandisers point out, de- 
veloped something new in washing 
machines when it brought out its auto- 
matic washer. It produced its first 
machine in September 1937. its 1,000,- 
000th machine in August 1947. 

Despite the number of Bendix machines 
used in public laundromats only 6.7 per 
cent of Bendix production has been sold 
for this purpose. It's possible for Bendix 
to have figures on this since the machines 
must be especially built for coin operation. 

At the time Bendix was introduced the 
{Please turn to page 62) 

SPONSOR 



The Mosul advertisins dgency's 


ex- 


perience in checking audiences 


for 


spot announcements and shows 


is 


one answer to question asked 


by 


Savarin's J. E. Mazzel on page 


44 



How a lew York 



ilgency (llieds Spot Listening 



over-all 



iQjntests, properly used, are 
I the best listening index for 
users of spot programs or spot announce- 
ments, according to the Emil Mogul 
organization. Mogul places the hardest- 
hitting of all commercial copy on the air — 
the advertising for Barney's, Stuart's 
(Moe Levy), National Shoes, Ronzoni 
Macaroni, and Canadian Furs.* Mogul 
checks both Hooper and Pulse reports 
for stations but places his maximum 
reliance on his own "broadcast control," 
which is kept current through contests. 
Contests generally are used to stimu- 
late programs and/or sales. Mogul's con- 
tests do this but sales and increased 
listening are purely a by-product. What 
Mogul wants to learn from contests is 
who is listening, city-block-by-city- 
block, hour-by-hour. There is no point- 
of-sale promotion of any Mogul contest. 
That, his staff explains, would simply 



hypo listening to the station or program 
and what is wanted is information on 
regular listening — not stimulation. The 
contests do result in listening stimulation 
but after the fact — not while the contest is 
running. Most of the time the contest is 
kept secret even from the station sales 
staffs who have been known to go out 
and hypo contest returns, f 

Mogul's contests give something to all 
who enter and have one major prize 
which is never too expensive. A recent 
first prize (in a Barney's contest) was a 
radio set costing $20. Unlike contests 
which are aimed at stimulating sales, 
no proof-of-purchase is required. The 
contests propound simple questions which 
practically anyone can figure out. The 
Barney contest was to report the number 
of inches between Times Square and 
Barney's store. The question requires no 
special knowledge, no genius. The gift 



Typical entry in contest to write sponsor's name (Stuart's) as many times as possible on a postcard 







FEBRUARY 1948 



for entering was a coat hanger costing 
five cents and, as indicated previously, 
the award for the nearest correct answer 
was a $20 radio. Despite the apparently 
small incentive, thousands sent in esti- 
mates and a number of listeners actually 
were discovered with yardsticks measur- 
ing the distance foot by foot. 

The contests naturally must intrigue. 
It is amazing what lengths listeners 
will go to for a nominal consideration. 
One recent contest asked listeners to 
Morey Amsterdam's program on WHN 
(N. Y.) to see how many times they 
could write the name of Stuart's on a penny 
postcard. Three thousand WHN listen- 
ers sat down and tried it and it was an 
unusual entry that didn't get more than 
300 "Stuart's" on a card. Some actually 
wrote more than 1 ,000. The prize for all 
was a ten-cent package of phonograph 
needles. The returns told Mogul just 
how much impact Morey Amsterdam's 
program and station WHN had. 

For National Shoes, Mogul asked lis- 
teners to write a sentence containing as 
many jive words as possible. The prize 
was Debbie Dictionary, an inexpensive 
slanguage compilation for teen-agers. 
Three stations were used for this con- 
test. The station that was rated first 
for the time period by Pulse of New York 
drew less than half the responses of the 
second station in the Pulse report. The 
third station which had the lowest time 
rate of three and the hottest program in 
teen-age appeal nevertheless cost the 
highest per inquiry. Facts like this go into 
Mogul's records and are used when the 
(Please turn to page 80) 

Advertisimj copy for all these products uses "irritation' 
to drive home its niessotjes. 

f Mogul hos four)d that ?0 per cent of all contest returns 
come front regulars who compete in any compelition. 
Through his "broadcast control" he knotvs the regulars — 
when he doesn't he just discounts returns hv :^ti per rent 



29 




Motion pictures have to be checked, processed, «nd camera-rehearsed, inch by inch, beiore telecasting 



MORE FILM THli UE 



^^^^ft^fck Television, to a great sec- 
SHw^^ tion of the viewing public 
and of those who will even- 
tually become TV set owners?, is "moving 
pictures in the home without film or home 
projectors." Since this is so, the objection 
"canned entertainment" that transcrip- 
tions had to overcome for years will not 
face film in visual air program produc- 
tion. Immediacy (live telecasting) is a 
plus for the medium, not the keystone 
upon which visual broadcasting must 
build. Film is therefore a vital factor in 
visual programing and one always in- 
cluded in plans for new stations. Every 
would-be station operator includes in his 
license application the percentage of time 
in which he plans to use film on the air and 
it has run in "acceptable applications" as 
high as 75 per cent of the total programs 
to be telecast. 

Films therefore represent a major factor 
in all visual broadcasting, both the adver- 
tising and the entertainment portions. 
Film can cost fantastic sums or it can be 
produced on tiny budgets. One sponsor 
recently wanted to produce a series of 
commercials to be used over a number of 
stations and a network. The commercial- 
film-producing organization that origin- 
ally estimated on the job figured the costs 
at $35,000, which floored the advertiser. 
The network, wanting the account on the 
air. offered to shoot the required number 
of films at cost. They also worked with 
the advertiser to readjust some of his 

%Eighl hundrrd familiet ('lOO tri oicnrrt and 'lOO non • 
mneri) itrre intrrtirwed by I'iMic Opinion Hrsnirch 
for Ihif infttrniatinn 

Chevrolet call its horse opera films "BCQ (Big 
car Quality) Ranch.' Uses cowboy announcer 



30 



more elaborate ideas. The total bill to the 
sponsor was $1 ,900. Neither the network 
nor the advertiser claims that the $1,900 
films are just as good as would have been 
delivered for $35,000 but both feel that 
they are adequate and will do their as- 
signed job. (The complete story on the 
use of film to handle the advertising por- 
tion of a telecast will be presented in the 
March sponsor. This report is on film as 
a program factor.) 

News is best handled by film in TV. 
Naturally it is not practicable to cover all 
the news in moving pictorial form on the 
air while it's still news. The span be- 



tween the taking of a news film and 
broadcasting it is a small fraction of the 
time it takes for a motion picture news- 
reel to take a picture and distribute and 
project it in theaters. This is due largely 
to the need for making positive prints, 
etc. TV can and does use negative film to 
telecast positive pictures. TV also can 
use 16 mm film instead of the 35 mm type 
that must be used for theater projection. 
The former is processed much more 
rapidly, is much less expensive, and while 
it lacks some of the detail that is caught 
with the larger film, that detail is not 
essential for telecast enjoyment on a 




f^ieivers rank motion 



pictures alieail of 
all exeept sports 




ABC staff checks film processed in flisht to cut time between picture taking and telecasting 



normal home-size receiver. TV has al- 
ready brought into the home event after 
event via films, several days before they 
were available through theater newsreels. 
This was true even in the case of Princess 
Elizabeth of England's recent marriage, 
TV newsreels being seen at least 24 hours 
before there were any theater showings. 
CBS, NBC, and independents regularly 
have taken pictures and shown them on 
the air within three hours. In a number 
of cases motion pictures of events have 
been aired within an hour after the event 
took place. 

A leader among sponsors who have used 



filmed news events is Charles Durban of 
U. S. Rubber. When a U. S. Rubber 
warehouse in New York as well as part of 
an adjoining office building that had for- 
merly housed U. S. Rubber burned down 
recently, Durban okayed a special film of 
the blaze which was aired the same night 
over DuMont's WABD, sponsored by 
U. S. Rubber. Because the office of 
Harvey Marlowe, ex-ABC and now an 
independent TV producer, was located 
right in the fire zone he was able to film it, 
in part, through his window and the 
entire cost to U. S. Rubber was just $100. 
Many events that U. S. Rubber has pre- 




sented cost many many times that $100 
for the rights alone, beside the even 
greater cost of film and camera work. Its 
presentation of the Columbus (Ohio) Air 
Races was one such filming. Many of 
U. S. Rubber's films were made for 
Durban by ABC, which for over a year 
(1945-1946) maintained a TV program 
operation to train personnel and keep that 
network's hands in the visual field, 
despite the fact that it had no station on 
the air. 

The three great news-gathering associa- 
tions. Associated Press, United Press, and 
International News Service, all plan to 
service television stations with daily 
newsreels. First to experiment in the 
field was INS which developed a ticker 
tape gadget which WABD has used to 
give some extra interest to its test pat- 
temf. Later INS developed a page 
printer type of visual news operation (an 
entire page is seen as a typewriter ap- 
parently types out the news) which is still 
employed by several stations. The first 
INS newsreel will be out this month in the 
form of a 1 5-minute weekly roundup. By 
March it is expected that INS will start 
servicing stations with daily five-minute 
reels. 

UP is operating in TV in conjunction 
with its pictorial affiliate, Acme Nf": 
Thus far UP-Acme has serviced stations 
WNBT and WBKB (Chicago) with still 
pictures and commentary. UP is plan- 
ning a 7H-minute newsreel which will in- 

t/l test pattern is a design aircast before a program to 
enable the set owner to tune his receiver in preparation 
for the program. 

U. S. Rubber sponsored Film of Rre that burned 
down its warehouse. Film cost was S100 



31 



corporate news, documentaries, and 
women's features. It is said to have 
offered a 3'time-a-week newsrecl to 
Camels (via Esty Advertising) for $3,500 
a week for New York showing. 

AP has released some experimental 
newsreels but is not satisfied with the 
quality. It's scheduled to start again in 
March. All three newsgathering organi- 
zations, although they have had still- 
picture divisions, have had to start vir- 
tually fiom scratch in the motion picture 
field. 

The first sponsor to buy a combination 
of still and motion pictures from a news- 
gathering syndicate is Chevrolet which is 
sponsoring an INS package 15 minutes 
once a week on WABD. The contract 
was signed in January. Esso has spon- 
sored the NBC Newsreel over WNBT but 
is not paying the bills at present. CBS' 
newsreels have only one telecast under- 
writer (Gulf) as SPONSOR goes to press. 

The union situation in the TV newsreel 
field is a constant problem for the indus- 



try. NBC, to avoid problems with its 
radio technicians who are members of 
NABET, an independent union, farms 
out its motion picture operations to Jerry 
Fairbanks, a short subject producer who 
employs regular I ATSE cameramen. CBS 
employs its own cameramen who are 
members of the union, IBEW, to which 
all of Columbia's technical personnel 
belong. In a number of cases where regu- 
lar newsreel and CBS men have covered 
the same event there have been clashes 
and CBS men have had to withdraw to 
avoid more serious trouble. DuMont's 
technical personnel are lATSE. Prob- 
lems between TV and motion picture 
cameramen have arisen at KTLA 
(Paramount's TV station on the West 
Coast) and WBKB (Balaban and Katz' 
station in Chicago). B&K is linked with 
Paramount and has thus far avoided any 
untoward incidents with unions, by not 
taking pictures. 

The regular theater newsreels have not 
released any of their reels for television. 



Calm On Tsili^iit Front 

The talent front in broadcasting, with the possible exception of 
the musicians, is quiet. The latest calm has settled over the Radio 
Directors Guild. The RDG and the four networks reached an 
understanding on all major points and their agreement, as is true of 
all contracts between chains and talent, indicates what will 
eventually be asked percentage-wise of sponsors of comm rcial 
programs. 

Staff directors scale starts at $130 minimum. This is a $30 
increase over the minimum in the previous contract between the 
Guild and the four networks. Associate directors minimum was in- 
creased from $70 to $95. Important to advertisers was the "floor" 
fees set for commercial assignment on which the networks will not 
take a commission. If the fee is less than $65 for directors or $55 for 
associates it is not commissionable. 

For a long time there have been conflicts between the networks 
and the RDG concerning the use of associate directors on what the 
Guild holds to be full-fledged directorial assignments. This disagree- 
ment has been settled by the new contract, with clean cut definitions. 
If a program requires casting, actual production — is really under the 
creative hand of the producer it will not in the future be an associate's 
province. Typical of what an associate can produce are newscasts, 
round tables, small music group programs, and street interviews. 

Although broadcasters bave felt that the American Federation of 
Radio Artists would ask for a wage increase this winter it is under- 
stood that there will be no such request unless living costs go a great 
deal higher than they are at present. AFRA inner councils feel that 
wage increases contribute substantially to the inflationary spiral and 
have decided for the time being to tighten belts. AFRA also realizes 
advertisers are watching broadcast advertising costs closely and that 
if these costs go beyond a certain point these advertisers will consider 
the shift of their advertising dollars to other mediums. Two of the 
greatest users of the air, Procter & Gamble and Lever Brothers, have 
weekly indices which give them their cost per listener at all times. 

32 



■MtiliiMiiMli 



Most of the major film releasing com- 
panies admit that something will be done 
when TV becomes truly national and 
there are enough outlets to off^er a sizable 
income to newsreel organizations. News- 
reels are the one segment of the film busi- 
ness producing a highl> perishable product. 
They also shoot hundreds of thousands 
of feet each year that never reach theater 
screens. TV newsreels will use more 
footage than theaters so will be a salvage 
operation for many picture subjects which 
are now lost on the cutting room floor. 
No one at any of the companies will talk 
about the film newsreels' TV day. 

The motion picture companies' attitude 
on newsreels is just a reflection of their 
attitude on releasing their regular feature 
pictures for visual air showing. Thus far 
the majors (big picture organizations) 
have thumbed down every approach on 
this subject. Only Universal has had an 
open mind, and is at present editing many 
of its older films, cutting out the music 
(Petrillo still says "no" to music on tele- 
vision). Even where pictures have had 
their first, second, third, and neighbor- 
hood runs and reruns, the pictures are not 
available for TV because most companies 
are worried about the reactions of their 
exhibitors who have let it be known in no 
uncertain way that they view television as 
competition with their box offices. The 
fact that motion pictures are planning to 
use TV time to bring their trailers into the 
home hasn't changed this. The first full- 
length trailer for which time has been 
bought is for the New York first-run 
showing of The Senator Was Indiscreet. 
The results at the box office are said to 
have surpassed the results of any other 
picture advertising to date (taking into 
consideration the costs and the number of 
television sets in the New York market at 
present). Some showings have brought 
customers direct from bars into the 
Criterion Theater to see the picture. 

Despite the reluctance of major motion 
picture producers to release their films for 
tiie visual air medium, thousands of short 
subjects and many independent pictures 
are available. How these can be used 
effectively by sponsors has been demon- 
strated by the Chevrolet dealer division of 
General Motors. The CM agency, 
Campbell-Ewald (New York), presented 
for Clievrolet each week for a year over 
WABD (up to January 20) a weekly 
Western film. The program was called 
tlie BCQ Ranch*, and the commercial was 
iiandled in a western drawl by an an- 
nouncer in 10-gallon hat and cowboy re- 
galia. The program had an all-family 

*li(X) fliindj fttr hi'j car qimhiy . 

{Please turn to page 74) 

SPONSOR 



^^^ 



CKLW CAN 

PUT YOUR 

PRODUCT OVER 



i^ 



Uui 



DETROIT A-^ 




4fO^ d^^Uutelif. <fei l^/ltJIxt ^^^^ ^^^^/^^^*<^ /^ ^^^^ 



ON 



CKLW 



Located on, and bounded by Lake Erie, Lake Huron and the Detroit River, 
CKLW beams its 5,000 watt clear channel sisnal via the water route to a ten-million population area 
with a radio-homes and buying-power percentage second to none in America. The power o\ 5,000 
watts day and night. A middle-of-the-dial frequency of 800 kc. That, coupled with the lowest 
rate of any major station in this market, has made CKLW the Detroit Area's Number One radio buy. 

Guardian Bldg., Detroit 26 Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc., Nat' I Rep. 

J. E. Campeau, President H. N. Stovin tS Co., Canadian Rep. 

5,000 Watts Day and Night— 800 kc. — Mutual Broadcasting System 

FEBRUARY 1948 33 



J 



FKItltl AIIV: HOOKS axo >atio>al im kijsiii:ks 



Radio has been selling magazines and 
books for over 20 years. Its first 
outstanding success was the great circula- 
tion campaign which Collier's broadcast 
in the late 20's and early 30's. The cam- 
paign turned just another magazine into 
a mass-audience weekly with a multi- 
million readership. It brought to radio 
John B. Kennedy who at that time was an 
associate editor of the publication. 

Today, in addition to buying time, 
publishers are making as many deals as 
possible with other sponsors of programs. 
The story of Street and Smith, which 
through a commercial series for Detective 
Magazine brought a character "The 
Shadow" into existence and then a maga- 
zine to protect that character in the publi- 
cation world, is radio history (Crime Pays, 
SPONSOR, January 1947). Today the Blue 



Coal radio program, The Shadow, con- 
tinues to sell the mystery magazine as 
well as heating service. Other magazine 
programs which are sponsored by manu- 
facturing organizations rather than the 
publishers are True Detective Mysteries, 
Reader's Digest, and My True Story. 

Publishers, besides inspiring programs 
wljich are sold to other sponsors, are con- 
stantly planning awards, special surveys, 
and articles which enable them to have 
their representatives appear on national 
progran s as guests. Hardly a week goes 
by that some editor isn't paying tribute to 
some program or star on the air — for the 
benefit of the publication — and it doesn't 
hurt the program if the appearance is 
well-planned. 

Selling of books is a fine art with 
Huber Hoge & Sons. Hoge functions for 



publishers practically on a day-to-day 
basis. If a broadcast series isn't deliver- 
ing sales at a cost per book that is in the 
advertising budget it's not unusual to 
have Hoge pull the program off the air the 
day after it starts slifTping. He uses prac- 
tically a mail-order formula. ( Direct Sell' 
ing Develops a Five Part Air Formula, 
SPONSOR, February 1947.) 

LxKal newspapers were not included in 
this industry report because so many of 
them own stations or have a station 
affiliation that the charting of them would 
have taken a book. 

Saturday Evening Post is the only 
weekly magazine currently on the air but 
there are plans afoot to bring Liberty back 
to radio and it will not surprise its com- 
petitors if Collier's starts its much- 
rumored return to broadcasting in 1948. 



SPONSOR 



America's Future, Inc. 
N. Y. 



Andrew Gahaqan, 

N. y. 



Asiociated Magazine Hubcr Hoge & Sons, 
Contributors, N. Y. 1 N. Y. 



PRODUCT 



Book: Constitution 
of the U.S. 



PROGRAMS 



Sam Pettengill; Sun 1-1:15 pm,- 235 
ABC sta 



'48 Magazine 



Spots; 2 sta 



Christian Science Pub- \ H. B. Humphrey, 
lishing Society, Boston Boston 


Christian Science Christian Science Monitor Views the 

Monitor News,- Tu 8:15-8:30 pm,- 75 ABC sta 


Curtis Circulation Co, 
Phila. 


BBD&O, 
N. y. 


SatEvePost, Holiday, Listening Post; MWF 10:45-11 am; E.t. spots for SatEvePost; 
Ladies Home Journal, Th 228 ABC sta all maior mkts. Sped mkl 
Esquire, Coronet, Ban- spot campaigns for Hoii- 
tam Books j ' day 


Delaware, Lackawanna 
& Western Coal Co, 
N. Y. 


RuthrauFT & Ryan 


Blue Coal (tie-in with 
Shadow Magazine)* 


The Shadow; Sun 5-5:30 pm,- 
37 MBS sta 




Doubleday & Co, 
N. Y. 


Huber Hoge * Sons, 

N. y. 


Dollar Book Club 




Spots; 9 SU 


Hall Brothers, Ine, 
Kansas City 


Foote, Cone & 
Belding 


Hallmark Cards (tie-in 
with Reader's Digest)* 


Reader's Digest — Radio Edition; Seasonal spot campaigns 
10-10:30 pm; 157 CBS $U 


Harper & Brothers, 
N. Y. 


Denhard, Pfelffer 
& Wells, N. y. 


Harper's Magazine 


Live spots; 1 sta 


Libby, McNeill & 
Libby, Chicago 


J. Walter Thompson 


Libby products (tie-in 
with True Story Maga- 
zine)* 


My True Story; MTWTF 10-10:25 

am; 202 ABC sta 


McGraw-Hill Publish- Walter Weir, 
ing Co, N. Y. N. y. 


Science Illustrated Partic. in Arthur Godfrey; bet. 6-7:45 - ■ 
am, MTWTF; WCBS(N. y.) 


Omnibook Inc, 
N. Y. 


Huber Hoge & Sons, 

N. y. 


Omnibook Magazine 


Partic. in Kiernan's Corner; bet. 6:30-7 
am, MTWTF; WJZ (N, y.) 






Williamson Candy Co, 
Chi. 



Aubrey, Moore & Oh Hcnryl Bars (tie-in 
Wallace, Chi. with True Detective 

Magazine)" 



True Detective Mysteries; Sun 4:30-5 
pm; 423 MBS sta 



William H. Wise & 
Sons, N. Y. 



Hubcr Hoge & Sons, 

N. y. 



Complete Home 
Handyman's Guide 



Record Handyman; Sat 5:30-5:45 pm; 

WNBC (N. yj 



'Programs, and their sponsors, are included in this listing where latter are not publishers but there is obvious tie-in between program and magazine. 
Production costs arc often borne or shared by cooperating publication. 



■BU^riUMi 



III 




The KMBC-KFRM Team is ringing 
the bell for listeners and advertisers 
alike throughout the Kansas City trade 
area. Advertisers are quick to sense 
the economical advantage of covering 
all the Kansas City trade territory 
through one broadcaster. 

And listeners from Kansas. Oklahoma, 



Nebraska, Colorado and other states 
are writing in to say they sure like 
KFRM's KMBC programming. Yes. 
KMBC of Kansas City and its new 
5,000-watt, 550 Kc. daytime associate, 
KFRM for rural Kansas, team together 
to provide what other broadcasters 
can't— complete coverage of the Kansas 
City trade territory from Kansas City. 




FEBRUARY 1948 



33 



J 



\0^t» 













NBC NETWORK TELEVISION 
IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS. 

This is NBC's report to 
the nation, published in 39 
newspapers of nineteen cities 
from coast to coast, early 
in January. 

1948 is the year when NBC 
sets out to duplicate in the 
television field its widely 
known superiorities in sound 
broadcasting: the finest 
affiliates and facilities, 
most popular programs, and 
greatest audiences. 

We reproduce the ad's message 
here, with an invitation to 
advertisers, agencies, and 
stations to join us in this 
development of the world's 
greatest means of mass 
communication — and the most 
effective sales medium yet 
devised. 



1948 

Televisiorislfear 



Television becomes a widening realit\ in 1948. An cxcitinii promise is now an actual 
service to the American home. After twenty years of preparation, NBC Network Television 
is open for business . . . When the Radio Corporation of America formed the National 
Broadcasting Company in 1926. its purpose was to broadcast better programs in the 
public intrrrsi — and that purpose continues to be its guidiiii: |)(»lic\. 

Toda\. twt'ulv-lwo Years later. NBC has the most popular programs in radio. 
Outstanding in its contribution to the public welfare, the National Broadcasting Company 
has served the nation in war and in peace. Now. it has added a new service — Network 
Television — in the same spirit as that which (irsl moved its parent companv: public interest. 
NBC, in pioneering and developing this great new medium of information, news, 
entertainment, and education, is fully aware of it> responsibiiitv ... In 1948. NBC offers 
to the public the greatest medium of mass comnuinication in the world — Network Television. 



^m 



m^ 



THE TELEVISION PICTURE LOOKS BRIGHT 



NBC's TELEVISION NETWORK 

In the East, four stations now make up 
the new NB(^ Television Network: 
WNBT, New York: WNIUV. Washing- 
ton; WPTZ, Philadelphia; and WKGB, 
Schenectady. WBAL-TV, Baltimore, 
and WBZ-TV, Boston, will be on the 
air shortly as NBC's fifth and sixth 
television affiliates. 

In the Midwest, three NBC affiliates 
are independently engaged in telecast- 
ing operations: KSD-TV. St. Louis; 
WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee; and WWJ-TV, 
Detroit. It is anticipated that within 
the year these stations will be carrying 
network television programs originat- 
ing in Chicago, where NBC will open 
its station. In addition, NBC will con- 
struct a station in Cleveland. 

On the West Coast an NBC station is 
under construction in Los Angeles. It 
will serve as a focal point for the estab- 
lishment of a western regional network. 

The plan for 1918 and 1949: To add 
ever-increasing numbers of affiliates to 
these three regional networks, culmi- 
nating in a coast-to-coast television 
network. 

TBLEVISION STATIONS 

Today, nineteen stations are engaged 
in television operations throughout 
the country. 

In addition to the stations now tele- 
casting, fifty-four have received licenses 
and sixty-four more have applications 
pending. 

Total: 137 stations in actual television 
operation, being constructed, or waiting 
for official approval from the Federal 
Communications Commission. 

We confidently expect that the same 
NBC-affiliated stations which pioneered 
sound broadcasting will take the lead 
in bringing this great new medium of 
sight and sound to their communities. 

THE TBLEVISION AUDIENCE 

One year ago there were 8,000 televi- 
sion receiving sets in the country 
Today there are 170,000. Estimate for 
December, 1948: 750,000 sets. 



With multiple viewers per set, NBC 
Network Television programs will be 
available to an audience of millions. 

TELEVISION PROGRAMMING 

Hundreds of thousands of viewers will 
remember these recent NBC Televi- 
sion programs among many others 
equally outstanding. 

IN DRAMA . . . 

Kraft Television Theater is the first 
regularly sponsored dramatic series on 
NBC Television. 

The Theatre Guild series brings the 
greatest art of the New York theatre 
to viewers distant from Broadway. 

On the American National Theatre and 
Academy series, comedy, drama, farce 
— the whole scale of the theatre — is 
brought to viewers as it is played. 

IN SPORTS . . . 

NBC Network Television has pioneered 
in bringing major sports events to its 
audience — from the exclusive broad- 
casts of the Joe Louis championship 
fights against Conn and Walcott to the 
World Series games of 1947. Today, 
one-quarter of NBC's current televi- 
sion schedule is devoted to sports 

IN SPECIAL EVENTS . . . 

The Presidential Conventions in Phila- 
delphia this coming summer will be 
comprehensively covered by mobile 
units of NBC's Television Network, 
bringing the faces and voices of political 
speakers into thousands of American 
homes. The campaigns that follow will 
receive equally emphatic coverage. 

Since the televising of President Roose- 
velt's speech at the World's Fair in 
1939, special events television has 
risen from the status of a novelty to 
the position of a significant communi- 
cations reality 

NBC*. PROGRAM SCHEDUif . . . 

In addition to extra hours for news 
and special events, a wide variety of 
programs can now be viewed on the 
new television network. Here is the 
current breakdown of each week's 
programming: 



7 hours for women's programs 

7 hours (or sports events 

■VA hours for variety shows 

■i hours (or dramatic presentations 

S liours for children's shows 

2 hours for educational programs 

IH hours for quiz and round-lalilc shows 

Two months from now the number of 
telecast hours will jump from twenty- 
seven to thirty-five a week. Still more 
hours will be added as the number of 
receiving sets increases and more sta- 
tions join the network. 

TELEVISION AND 
THE AMERICAN ECONOMY 

ADVERTISING 

Like standard radio broadcasting, net- 
work television will depend for the 
expansion of its facilities and programs 
on advertising. As advertising has built 
the wide range of radio's broadcasting 
schedule, so it will make possible an 
increasing wealth of fine programs on 
television. 

Today, 18 of the country's large adver- 
tisers are sponsoring NBC television 
programs — about half of them on the 
entire television network. Some two 
hundred other advertisers are currently 
sponsoring programs on the twenty- 
odd individual stations throughout the 
rountrv 

ECONOMIC FORCE 

It is NBC's belief that, within a few 
years, more than a (piartei of a million 
peoplt will be employed in the manu- 
facturing and telecasting operations of 
the business alone Available estimates 
point to television as a half-billion- 
dollai business by the end of this year. 
This new industry will grow in size 
and service with the years 

THE FUTURE 

NBC's new eastern television network 
IS only the beginning. But it is the 
beginning of a uorlang reality. 1947 
marks the end of television s interim 
period. 1948 signifies the appearance 
of ceievision as a new force in the 
United States. The greatest means of 
mass communication m the world is 
iiith us 



NBC Television 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 

A Service of Radio Corporation oj America 




II Mr 
» » » ^> 
• I* II 



ROBERT FULTON 



'^^ was first with his invention of the 

> first practical steamboat, the Cler- 
mont, launched on the Hudson River 
in 1807. . . a mighty ally in the early struggle 
for the economic development and expan- 
sion of the United States. And WJR is . . . 






IN POWER 

AND RESULTS 

MICHIGAN'S GREATEST 
ADVERTISING MEDIUM 




± 



5 0,000 
WATTS 




CBS 



THE GOODWILL STATION fisher bldg 



ktprmtmntud by 

PITR Y 

DETROIT 



G. A. RICHARDS 

Prti. 



HARRY WISMER 
Asi>. fo r/ie Prat. 



38 



SPONSOR 



iMiU^iiliiiii 



..MD 





Continuing promotion is the 
keystone of station operation 
just as it has been proved to be 
the keystone of newspapers throughout 
the nation. The New York Daily News 
and Chicago Tribune Golden Gloves bouts 
and Silver Skates races are recognized 
internationally. The growth of these two 
competitions gives ample proof, through 
turn-away attendance at all of the 
events, of the readership among the 
teen-agers and sports fans. Among 
younger readers the newspapers through- 
out the U. S. which run local soapbox 
derbies are tops and these papers prove, 
by the size of the adult turn-outs for their 
derbies, their family readership. WJW's 
promotion of Junior Olympics is obtaining 
the same following as the soapbox derbies. 
It is in the farmbelt that listener pro- 
motion through contests has been given 
most attention and has proved the pull of 
the stations that have planned farm 
public service promotions. Some have 
received outstanding national recognition 
— KVOO's Greener Pastures competition, 
WMT's Clean Plowing Contest, and the 
granddaddy of them all, WHO's National 
Plowing Competition. The latter two 
have so built themselves into the farm life 
of Iowa that a network (NBC) originated 
from the sponsoring stations coast-to- 
coast broadcasts during the plowing. 
Thousands of farmers and their wives 
watched contestants vie for hundreds of 
dollars in cash prizes and trophies. As 
though to spotlight the modem farmer to 
the world, 63 private farmer-owned air- 
planes were included as transportation to 
the WMT's event and over 70 flew to the 
WHO shindig. The car-parking fields 
resembled the scene outside a big football 
stadium during an important game. 

The WMT Clean Plowing Contest is a 
one-day event in April but for sponsors on 
WMT it is a promotion that starts many 
weeks earlier, in February, when the con- 
test day is announced in letters to farmers 

Aerial view 'of i WHO's 'National Plowing 
Contests, an event in lives of Iowa's farmers 

FEBRUARY 1948 



Soil eonservalioii c*oiitej«iN liiiild 



au«lienees for faroi Mlalioiis. anil 



flevolop rural ari^a liiisiii<\«<M 







39 







4«=:^^#^^^r 




ft 



7f^C 






* 'V 




COUNTY VVELCOMKYOU 





throughout Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, and 
Missouri stressing the importance of clean 
plowing to oflsct the damage caused by 
the EurofK'an Corn Borer. Newspapers 
carry stories on the event all through the 
time between the first announcement and 
the final Saturday in April when the 
plowers prove their mettle. 

Eighteen sponsors cooperated with 
WMT in 1947 in presenting news of the 
event on their programs and exhibits at 
the contest field. They ran from seed 
merchants to tractor manufacturers. 
Saturday, April 26, contest day, was 
turned into a farmers' holiday. The pro- 
gram opened at 9 a.m. with an Educa- 
tional and Commercial Exhibit. At 10 
a.m. there was a preliminary event — a 
farm gadget contest. This was a sleeper 
and pulled a much larger number of home- 
built farm gadgets than were expected. 
They were as instructive and useful as 
many of the commercial machines which 
were on display. First prize was $100. 

The main event was at 1 1 a.m. and was 
followed by a band concert at 1 1 :30 a.m. 
and a special WMT entertainment broad- 
cast at noon. At 1 :30 p.m. there was a 
farmers' mass meeting, at 2 :30 a presenta- 
tion of the winners over WMT, and at 
2:45 an airplane dusting demonstration, 
showing how planes dust fields with 
chemicals for com borer control. 

Through this promotion WMT has 
established itself in the minds of rural 
Iowa as a station that doesn't just try to 
sell them things but is part of the state 
and interested in farmers' prosperity. By 
helping the farmer raise more com WMT 
is increasing the income of its listeners 
while at the same time increasing listening 
to the station. These service promotions 
not only dramatize a station's audience 
for sponsors but also build audiences. A 
one-time event can have a 365-day effect. 

Station WHO started its bigtime pro- 
motion simply as a com plowing competi- 
tion. Then a contour plowing event was 
added. Now these two contests and a 
number of other events are wrapped up in 
a soil conservation project, which spot- 
lights this great need of all farm areas. 

Although it's service designed for a 
specific public (more than half of the 
population served by WHO is rural) this 
B. J. Palmer station has received national 
recognition from its promotion. Among 
the plaques which adorn its walls are the 
du Pont and the Peabody awards. 
Life ran a multi-page story on WHO 
plowing contests. Motion picture the- 



atergoers see its story in newsreels. 
More than 100 Iowa daily and weekly 
newspapers tell WHO's tale each year. 
When WHO, as a special soil conservation 
promotion, face-lifted an entire farm 
50,000 farmers and their wives were 
present to discover the 29 conservation 
operations involved, and the nation heard 
about it. 

WHO formerly ran a com husking bee 
but com husking by hand is passing from 
Iowa. Today less than 10 per cent of the 
crop is hand harvested. Instead of com 
husking, WHO now holds an annual 
competition for prize com during this 
month. Com husking was just a stunt. 
Giving an award for raising the best com 
is not a stunt but an excellent wa>' of im- 
proving the breed. Better and better 
com is being grown in Iowa and through- 
out the Middle West. It's been competi- 
tions such as WHO'S corn-growing events 
that inspire the use of finer seed com and 
the vital increased use of hybrid varieties. 

KVOO's Greener Pastures broadcasts 
and promotion are directed at doing for 
Oklahoma's pastures what the WMT and 
WHO Plowing Contests do for the Iowa 
com fields. Since the entries were pas- 
tures throughout Oklahoma and a comer 
of Kansas, Iowa, and Arkansas, it is not 
possible to have a great tumout to 
dramatize the audience of KVOO but 
hundreds of pastures are entered. What 
is more important to the farmers in the 
area, the lesson is driven home that pas- 
tures can't be left to "just grow," like 
Topsy, but have to be planted and 
watched over. 

To get the farm agent behind the con- 
test, a $25 Stetson hat goes to him if a 
farmer in his county is one of the four 
who are cited for their pastures. 

Winners, who are chosen by farm 
authorities, are guests of KVOO at the 
Chicago Intemational Livestock Show. 
One or more of the winners receives 
national recognition through a certificate 
from the Friends of the Land, the na- 
tional association of soil conservationists. 

Soil conservation is vital and KVOO is 
doing a farm promotion job which covers 
not only its territory but is spread 
throughout all farmland at county fairs 
and the Chicago Livestock gathering. 

The Greener Pastures and the Clean 
Plowing contests and broadcasts may be 
only small operations in themselves but 
they are indications of virile station 
managements. They tum out, for all to 
check, just how effective, in terms of 
their rural audiences, these operations are. 



(top) Samples oF KVOO's winning pastures, (second) 50,000 saw WMT's plowing contest, 
(third) WHO's scoreboard, (bottom) Nearly 133 farmers flew to plowing events 

SPONSOR 



^_^_g^|__|. 





Yes, almost everybody in Atlanta starts the day tuned to WCON and 
Bill Hickok, genial host and record man (and you ought to hear him 
sing) of "Harmony House" — 6:30 to 9 a.m. Mondays through Saturdays. 

And Bill Hickok is just one of a top staff of superb radio personalities 
who have made WCON's listening audience the best buy in this area for 
both local and national advertisers. 



Drawing bij A. B. Frost from •UNCLE REMUS: Hi.i Songs and Hui 
Sayings" by Joel Chandler Harris, jvhich first appeared in THE 
ATLANTA CONSTITUTION in 1879. Copyright 1908. 1921, by 
Esther La Rosa Harris. By periniaaion of [>. Appleton-Century 
Company, publisher. 



THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION STATION 
5000 WAT'FS 550 KG 

Affiliated, American Broadcasting Company 

National Representatives HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



FEBRUARY 1948 



41 




Proju^raniin^S in afternoon 
is eNMontial for nt^'w viei%^ers 
and KaloK of ro«*oiver!« 



For the most part, television receivers 
must be sold in the daytime. The visual 
medium is very difficult to sell with only 
test patterns on the air — even if those 
test patterns, as in the case of DuMont's 
WABD and some other stations, have a 
news-ticker tape moving across their face. 
Daytime programing is and will continue 
to be costly to stations until set dis- 
tribution has reached a point in an area 
where there are enough viewers to justify 
commercial sponsorship. The result is 
that if there are to be daytime programs in 
territories that are opening up to tele- 
vision in most cases they will have to be 



sponsored by television receiver manu- 
facturers and/or distributors and dealers. 

That's just what's happening in De- 
troit, in Milwaukee, and in Washington, 
D. C. In New York there are enough 
sets to justify daytime commercials and 
WCBS-TV has four sponsors under- 
writing The Missus Goes A-Shopping and 
Swift sponsors Home Service Club with 
Tex and Jinx on NBC Fridays. 

An excellent example of cooperative 
effort to set up daytime telecasting is the 
job being done by Henry J. Kaufman 
& Associates for Southern Wholesalers 
(RCA-Victor distributors) and 50 radio 



and television dealers. The Capital 
City situation didn't differ from that of 
any other city in which TV is a growing 
medium. Except for special events 
(opening of Congress, etc. and Saturday, 
Sunday, and holiday afternoon sports) 
there was no scanning in the daylight 
hours. Dealers were finding it hard to 
sell television receivers with only test 
patterns for prospective set owners to 
see. Advertising agencies were finding 
it difficult to talk TV to sponsors inter- 
ested in using time on the medium with 
nothing to see on the air in the daytime. 
The stations were loath to stage day- 



Hish school sames arc good bets on Fridays — for parents, students, and sports fans. Tfiey make fans want sets fjom Washington dealer 




49 



SPONSOR 



^g^^^___^ 



time sustaining programs. NBC had 
tried to put on programs for participating 
sponsorship with unhappy results. Sev- 
era! attempts had been made by WNBT 
in New York to sell advertisers daytime 
programs addressed to women but with 
the exception of Swift no progress had 
been made. 

The Kaufman organization convinced 
Southern Wholesalers that the answer to 
increased sales and TV acceptance was 
a program sponsored by them as many 
days of the week as financially possible. 
Southern however felt that dealers 
should share in the costs since they were 
going to receive as much benefit as 
Southern was from the program. That 
was a poser. It isn't too difficult to sell a 
few dealers on contributing toward pro- 
motion costs, but to sell as many as 
the quota in this case. 50, is usually 
impossible. 

They were sold. Jeff Abel, an agency 
partner, Bob Maurer, agency program 
and continuity head, Irving Dalo, radio 
and television sales manager for Southern 
Wholesalers, and Charles DeLozier, 
WNBW (NBC Washington TV outlet), 
all took part in the selling. 

Each dealer receives two announce- 
ments per week on the series which runs 
Wednesday through Saturday. It costs 
the average dealer under $25 a week and 
the entire package, time and talent, is 
under $1,500 a week. 

The first problem was to make certain 
that all the dealers had RCA- Victor 
television receivers on the floor. This 
meant home ofl^ce cooperation by RCA. 
Then Kaufman promoted tie-in news- 



paper advertising from dealers and 
Southern Wholesalers took space to tee 
off the series. Window streamers were 
supplied to all the dealers streamers 
that invited the public in to see the show. 

The program runs an hour, except 
Fridays when high school basketball (it 
was football when the promotion first 
started) is scanned. The Friday schedule 
is from 3:15 to 5 p.m. 

Wednesday is film feature day and 
cartoons, documentaries, and other short 
subjects are run. About three are used 
each week. 

A live show is scanned on Thursday. 
It's a combination of fun and fashions. 
First titled Ftin at Four it's now Fashions 
at Four. About half the program is a 
style show, the fashions being supplied 
by a different department store or 
specialty shop each week. A fashion 
coordinator and commentator works with 
the agency lining up the clothes and the 
running continuity for the program. The 
rest of the half hour is entertainment — 
singers, dancers, magicians, chalk talk 
artists, all professional and all coordi- 
nated with the fashion motif if possible. 
The producer points out that this is 
easiest to do with magicians and artists, 
but that even dancers and singers can be 
made part of a TV fashion presentation. 
To lend a masculine touch to the pro- 
ceedings there's an mc, Ray Michaels, 
who wanders through the program chat- 
ting with the fashion authority, intro- 
ducing the acts, and tying the hour 
together. The program isn't given over 
entirely to fashions because men still have 
{Please turn to page 89) 




District of Columbia teen-agers are entertained 
by TV dealers with a jive and Pepsi session 



'Fashions at 4" sussest a TV set to milady. 




Entertainers save show trom being too Feminine 




FEBRUARY 1948 



43 



J 





P Mf. Sponsor isks... 



'*ls it possihU' lor uii iulvcrtiser iisin*; spot programs 
lo <l<'U'riiiiii4' llu'ir popularity and relative impact 



tl 



uliile llie eampaigii is in progress: 



9m 



, , _ I Advertiiing Manager 

John t. Mazzci | $. /. Schonbrunn & Co. (Savann Coffee) 




>♦ 




The 

Piekeil l^anel 

>lr. >la%zei 



The spot pro- 
gram user can de- 
termine the effec- 
tiveness of his 
E^||a^ ^ ' shows while his 
f^^ll campaign is under 

way. He can de- 
termine not only 
the size of the 
audiences he 
reaches ("popular- 
ity"), but, more important, the impact of 
the programs on sales. 

Radio research has long been able to 
provide popularity ratings. Telephone 
coincidental measurements can determine 
this popularity. Admittedly this tech- 
nique is most effective in areas where the 
incidence of telephone ownership is large, 
and where a measurement of a limited 
area will suffice. For programs carried 
too early in the morning or too late at 
night for telephonic intrusion in the home, 
this method of course is impossible. 

The automatic recorder (Nielsen, CBS's 
newly announced lAMS) will certainly 
answer the spot advertisers' questions — 
wherever these devices are available in 
sufficient sample size within the station- 
areas used. Our own Listener Diary 
Studies provide the spot advertiser with a 
comprehensive picture of his audience 
throughout the station's area, regardless 
of time of broadcast and among all types 
of homes. The advertiser using a station 
which is making a Diary study while his 

SPONSOR report on ipol checking it on pajc 99 



program is on the schedule can establish 
many valuable and important indices of 
his program's popularity: the loyalty of 
the audience, where it comes from, as well 
as its size and composition. 

Recently, a new research tool has been 
developed which cuts more nearly to the 
heart of the problem — the measurement 
of advertising impact on sales. The Con- 
sumer Panel technique, long a favored one 
in national measurements, is now in oper- 
ation in some local and regional areas. 
The Panel is a continuing record of the 
purchases of a representative sample of 
families, kept day by day and month after 
month. We have recently released such a 
panel in Oklahoma City, sponsored by 
WKY and its newspaper affiliate, the 
Oklahoman and Times. From Panel re- 
ports the advertiser can establish continu- 
ously, from the beginning of his campaign 
on, the effect of his advertising on actual 
purchases of his product. Coincidentally, 
he can utilize the panel families — a truly 
accurate sample of the area — at any time 
to establish the size of his audience. He 
can correlate listening with buying and 
arrive at a real evaluation of the effective- 
ness of his program. Already advertisers 
on WKY have watched, month by month, 
the progress of their sales efforts and 
measured not only audience size, but 
sales results. 

The Consumer Panel, the Listener 
Diary, Automatic Recorders, Telephone 
Coincidentals all are prohibitively ex- 
pensive if employed to measure only one 
program. But when they are used by all 
advertisers and underwritten in part by 
the medium — they truly can, in greater or 
lesser measure, make it possible for the 
advertiser using spot radio properly to 
evaluate its worth. 

Robert H. Salk 

President 

Audience Surveys, Inc. 

New York 




It most cer- 
tainly is always 
possible. However, 
whether it is prac- 
tical is primarily a 
function of the fol- 
lowing: 

a ) The accuracy 
to which it is de- 
sired to learn the 
"popularity" and 
"relative impact." (A 50 per cent in- 
crease in accuracy generally requires con- 
siderably more than 50 per cent increase 
in cost.) 

b) "^he precise meaning of relative. 
(I.e., relative to what? — if relative to pro- 
grams of approximately equal magnitude 
in coverage and popularity, differences 
might be quite difficult to isolate.) 

c) The program frequency and the 
popularity of the program itself. (The 
less the frequency and or popularity, the 
more difficult it is to find the listeners — 
and hence the more costly the task.) 

d) The period of exposure preceding 
the test. (The lower the frequency, and/ 
or popularity, the greater the period of 
exposure desirable before either assign- 
ment be undertaken.) 

Methods — Popularity 

The |x>pularity would be determined by 
a special "rating." If the same program 
is being used in different cities, the likeli- 
hood is that an average rating in several 
cities is more useful than a city-by-city 
rating — ^just like on^a national operation, 
one is usually most concerned with the 
average over-all popularity performance. 
If such an average is desired, one obvi- 
ously requires considerably fewer con- 
tacts in a given city than if a separate 
rating is required in that city. 

These ratings can most economically be 
obtained by telephone — particularly if 
one expects to rcf)eat the process from 
time to time in quest of a trend. 






SPONSOR 



Methods — Impact 

Various methods of measuring impact 
can be introduced. These would parallel 
methods of measuring impact currently 
used on national programs — but with the 
particular limitations referred to in the 
first paragraph above. 

Primarily, impact measures are of two 
types: 

a) Sales Tests. These can be store 
checks, panels, or whatever means are 
available to the advertiser. It is prob- 
able, however, that sales checks would be 
slow and insensitive in reporting on most 
spot program operations — particularly 
because most of the limitations referred to 
in the first paragraph above usually are 
found to apply. 

b) Consumer Surveys. Consumer sur- 
veys can be set up which will enable the 
advertiser to determine the degree to 
which 1) his message has penetrated to 
prospects, 2) the delivery of his message 
is associated with use of his product. 

The latter measure would probably be 
the most useful — but, because of the 
tremendous sample which would usually 
be required because of the limitations on 
practicality listed above, it is not usually 
feasible. 

Dr. E. L. Deckinger 

Research director 

The Biow Company, New York 




The impact of 
spot programs can 
be measured in the 
same manner as 
the effectiveness of 
advertising mes- 
sages through 
other media, by 
application of 
standard research 
techniques. 
According to the type of product being 
promoted and the promotional problem, 
checks of sales movement of goods 
through retail outlets and/or consumer 
surveys may be developed which can pro- 
vide tangible indications. 

The practical method, in most cases, is 
to set up a control, an advance check 
which will establish the position of the 
product before the spot campaign starts. 
Then, recheck at some logical time inter- 
val, or periodically, after the campaign is 
under way. Too often, however, the im- 
portant advance checks seem to be 
neglected and reliance put solely upon in- 
vestigations made after the program is 
under way. A great deal more informa- 
tion can be derived from the "before-and- 
(Please turn to page 56) 





BOOK OF THE MONTH 



* Performance is too often an un-weighed 
selling factor in radio advertising. At WFBM, 
we believe perfection oj performance is vital! 
For instance: 

ANNOUNCERS When continuity is "live," compe- 
tence is indispensable. We subscribe to the 
policy that thorough training and experience 
in "air selling" are required to qualify for 
voicing your phrases over WFBM. 

TRANSCRIPTIONS WFBM does not believe in 
gambling with nor gamboling through your 
transcriptions. Every platter is pretested to 
assure that it's properly cued and aired at the 
proper level. Only the best equipment is used — 
and every turntable is checked daily to assure 
proper speed. 

AFFIDAVITS Slovenly reports of performance are 
not tolerated. WFBM's afifidavits, taken from 
the Engineer's log, include the exact second of 
performance. 

WFBM announcers, engineers, and auditors 
are human. But we consistently come close to 
99 44/100% perfection in performance. 



BASIC AFFILIATE; Col umbia Bro0dcastlng System 
Represented Nationoliy by The Katz Agency 



FEBRUARY 1948 



45 




minute show series with wide 
Ir the small budget advertiser 







f f 



Mi 



[<«^ \ x«. ***^~> .(tvv, V* »•'«•-» Avk V"»'>'\,» Ukw.'h WktsMf .^i^ki.MI 



to interest small budget advertisers. 
If you've been looking for a network quality 
five-minute show, one that produces valuable 
day-to-day continuity, send for audition 
discs. There's no obligation and you are in 
for a real surprise. Cost, availabilities, and 
other details also available on request. 



■I 



fiMOk 



■r^ 




):^ALES, INC. 

d,| Telephone 2-4974 



New York— 47 West 56th St.— CO 5-1 544 
Chicago — 612 N. Michigan Ave., Superior 3053 
Hollywood— 6381 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 5600 



spot 
trends 



B«sed upon the number of pro3rams and an- 
nouncements placed by sponsors with stations 
and indexed by Rorabaugh Report on Spot 
Radio Advertising. Spots reported for month 
oF September 1947 are used as a base oF 100 



Spot placement took its usual December nosc'dive, dropping from 
November's 102.46 to 77.49. Thirty fewer sponsors were active 
during the month than in November. Only "Beverages and Con- 
fectionery" held its own during the pre-holiday season. Sectionally, 
only the South continued at the same level as in the previous month. 
Pacific and Rocky Mountain areas showed the greatest drop, from 
100.76 to 88.3. Although this is the first normal post-war year, 
the seasonable drop is as far off as it has been pre-war. Orange 
juice (Birds Eye and Minute Maid; reversed the field and with 
a number of beer accounts increased their station lists to keep 
December from being completely in the doldrums. 



1947-48 


AUG 1 SEP 1 OCT 1 NOV! DEC 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


MAY 


JUN 


JUL 1 


250 


Bated 


upon repo 


rts from 24 


4* Sponsor 


s 
















200 


























150 


























100 — 




^ 






























^1 A Vl^^^l A ■ 






i^BB^ 1 


F^IB% 












NATIONAL iKEnu 


50 


79.28 


100.00 


102.69 


102.46 


77.49 












1 i 1 1 1 







Tre 


nds 


by Geo 


gra 


phical Area 


s 






^^S 


gig Via I.I4I tthvmn tr.m turn 


Bra: 


Diil 




250- 


2,S 


!80,000 r 


adio 


fami 


let 














200- 


























150 — 

100 — 


























50 — 


lOU 


loe.oo 


!7.« 


il.}0 


n.u 






1 


New England 1 


250- 


9,1 


66,0 


00 r 


sdio 


•ami 


ies 














200- 


























150 — 


























loo- 
se - 




^ 


HH 


|H 


















1 


\Aiddle Atlantic { 


71.20 


100.00 


I0S.4I 


I0}.40 


it. 00 


250- 


11, 


387,( 


)00r 


adio 


Fami 


lies 














200 — 


























ISO — 


























loo- 
se- 


^^ 




^M 




^^ 
















Itl.l7 


100.00 


111.10 


101.00 


It4.]0 


1 


Mid-Western 


250— 


6,: 


I99,C 


00 r 


idio 


Fami 


i«> 














200— 


























150— 
100— 


























SO— 


loo.n 


100.11 


0140 


M.SO 


OS.IO 






1 


Southern 


250~ 


4, 


766, 


300 


radio 


Fam 


lies 














200~ 


























150- 








^ 


















100 


^^^ 








HH 






1 


PdciFic artd 


SO — 


lUi 


lOO.OO 


101.12 


I00.7k 


1 

,1110 






IJ 


Rocky MounUin 



Trends by Industry Classifications 

8 6 Sponsors Reporting 



1947.48 AUG SEP lot! iNOVl DECIjanI FEB ImaRIaPR ImAV JUN I JUL 




70 Sponsors Reporting 



tJllmilmri 



Beverages and 
Confectionery 



Soaps, Cleaniers 



Automotive 



Miscellaneous 



I 1 



"For iFiis total a sponsor is regarded as a single corporate entity no matter Fiow many diverse divisions it may include. In the industry reports, 
however, the same sponsor may be reported under a number oF classifications. 



48 



SPONSOR 




1 



HOOPER 

NIELSEN 

PULSE 

CONLAN 

AND 

A. PATSY 



O 






7 




^^ 



It's dawning on many a radio time buyer that HE may be a "patsy" 
in radio's mad welter of proof and counter-proof. He's beginning 
to wonder wfiy radio shouldn't be bought on space buying's tried 
and true conception of media power: 

WHO ARE THEY AND WHY ARE THEY 
READING (or listening!) 

Casual tune-in lacks SELL POWER, just as free publications do. 
Purposeful tune-in has SELL POWER, just as space in bought and 
paid for publications has SELL POWER. 

Radio program structure here at WSAI is BUILT to create purpose- 
ful tune-in. Time buyers are finding out that it pays . . . that's why 
93% of all Cincinnati department store radio is carried by WSAIl 



CINCINNATI 

UlSfll 



n-Bc 



A MARSHALL FIELD STATION REPRESENTED BY AVERY-KNODEL 

FEBRUARY 1948 49 



J 



COBRA TONE RRM 





^ 



/' 



/ 



V 



The COBRA is Only One of 
the Reasons Why America 
Prefers Zenith 



Wurlitzer Sedc^ ^ O^ika^ 



"^ After exhaustive tests, Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, the 
world's largest maker of commercial phonographs, selected 
the Zenith COBRA Tone Arm for use on all its models . . . 
and the reason why makes mighty good sales ammunition 
for you. 

Wurlitzer's years of experience had shown that with the con- 
ventional type pickup, record fidelity starts to fall off at from 
50 to 300 plays and from then on falls off ^ast. Their tests 
proved that with the COBRA Tone Arm records still retained 
95% of their original tone fidelity after TWO THOUSAND 
plays. 



TELL THE WURLITZER STORY TO YOUR CUSTOMERS 

Here's what it means to them. They can be sure that a Zenith 
Radio Phonograph with a COBRA Tone Arm will play their 
records as often as they like and still keep them sounding 
virtually like new. Furthermore, the COBRA reproduces rec- 
ords so perfectly without annoying needle noise or scratch that 
even brand new records sound better. Yes, the COBRA means 
record reproduaion at its best— and only Zenith has the 
COBRA. 



^3n{^ ^ac^ (x^omtci^ • 600/ Z^xc^m^ /^c^e • Ciica^ 39, o^' 



50 



SPONSOR 




PROMOTION 



nt in FM 



BrjBi§ Buyers of time on standard 
"^TmMmm^ broadcasting stations until 
recently have been obsessed by the idea of 
purchasing the power stations, even more 
than they have had Hooperitis. There 
is still in the 89-odd cities where there are 
City Hooperatings, a tendency to shop 
for availabilities with high Hoopers. The 
great majority of sponsors still think in 
terms of buying all the 50,000-watt sta- 
tions they can afford or snare. Certain 
station representatives have chipf)ed 
away at the power-station fetish until 
now a few advertisers are willing to judge 



On home receivers 
competing FM out- 
lets are equal in 
signal strength 
and sound quality 



their broadcast commitments in a market 
on the factual basis of the job that each 
station is doing in that market. It's a 
healthy approach and a realistic one. 

In the FM field the power fetish is 
dead, or will be when all stations are 
operating at their full licensed strength 
as they soon must be. This is because 
every station is required by Federal 
Communications Commission regulation 
to cover effectively the same area with 
the same quality of signal as any other 
FM station operating in the territory. 
This does not mean that the power at 
the transmitter is the same. The height 



of the transmitter is such a vital factor 
in sending forth an FM signal that a 
trananitter at 950 feet does the same 
job with 3,500 watts as another 500 
feet above the ground does on 20,000 watts 
and in the unique case of WNBC-FM, 
on top of New York's Empire State 
building, only 1,500 watts are required. 

These figures are for what is known as 
Class B, or metropolitan, FM stations. 
The Class B stations in New York are 
supposed to cover 65 miles. In other 
metropolitan areas the required coverage 
may not be so great for Class B stations 
but as indicated previously all stations in 
each area must deliver the same quality 
signal throughout their licensed service 
territory. 

There are two other classes of FM 
outlets. Class A, which covers community 
stations, is designed, according to most 
engineers, to blanket an area of 15 miles 
effectively. 

Third FM class is the rural outlet, 
which is licensed to operate at very 
high power (for FM). There are too 
few stations operating in this cate- 
gory now to determine what the coverage 
of these transmitters will be. 

Programing at most FM stations has 
admittedly not even approached com- 
petitive stature except in a few areas 
and except where the outlets have been 
able to sign up important sporting events. 
This situation is rapidly being changed 
as more and more AM-FM receivers 
come onto the market and into the homes, 
with converters and tuners now avail- 
able, in the low or medium price range 
($3(>-$60). The block-programing tech- 
nique (sponsor, October 1947) which 
has been so successful with independent 
stations throughout the United States 



is being widely studied and used by new 
FMers. The tested formulas of music 
and news, and music, news, and sports, 
are being used by more than 60 per cent 
of the FM stations. 

That there is a growing audience for 
this program fare is shown by the ready 
acceptance achieved by stations like 
WHHM in Memphis, WCKY in Cin- 
cinnati, and WHDH in Boston. 

FM station promotion hasn't been very 
aggressive. The most thoughtful selling 
of FM station service has been in areas 
where there isn't adequate AM impact. 
These non-urban FMers have repre- 
sented and worked with tuner and set 
manufacturers and have built up faithful 
audiences. (A complete report on FM 
audiences — who listens, how frequently 
they listen, and why they listen — will be 
a feature in March of sponsor's con- 
tinuing study of FM.) 

Recent highspot in FM promotion is 
WWDC's adapting of the Truth or Con- 
sequences "Miss Hush" formula. Lis- 
teners were asked to recognize "Mr. FM" 
for prizes that ran well over $5,000. The 
promotion was run by WWDC-FM to 
signalize its going on the air at full rated 
power. Like many FM stations it had 
been operating previously at interim 
power and wanted to make its better 
service known to residents of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia and the surrounding 
areas which WWDC-FM reaches and 
which WWDC does not. This type of 
promotion is one of the two ways by 
which buyers of broadcast advertising 
can judge the effectiveness of an FM 
operation. 

With power not a competitive factor 
the buyer of FM broadcast advertising 
must look to programing and promotion. 



FEBRUARY 1948 



51 



Contests and Offers 



G 



a SiPO^'Min monihlv labulai 



PROGRAM 



AMERICAN OIL CO 



('•lis, oil, 
tires 



Professor 
Quiz 



Saturdav 
10-10:30 pm 



tSOcash 



Coinplt-tc in up to 25 words sentence about 

Amoco product ^different weekly). Winner 

gets $25 plus S25 if he included 5 acceptable 

questions and answers for use on program 



ABC 



BELK HUDSON DEPT 
iTORE 



Clothing 



1340 Club 



MWF 

(as scheduled) 



Feather-Knit Sweater 



Identify "mystery tune" to station. First 
correct reply wins 



WFEB. 

SylacMiga, 

Ala. 



COLGATE-PALMOLIVE- 
PEET CO 



Colgate 
Toothpaste 



Can You 
Top ThisT 



Saturdav 
8:30-9 pm 



Cash prizes and "Can You Top This" 
gag book 



Prizes if joke sent to proersin is used 



NBC 



CONTINENTAL BAKING CO 



Wonder Bread, 
Hostess Cakes 



Grand Slam 



MTWTF 
11:30-11:45 pm 



Various merchandise prizes; chance at 
Grand .Slam Bonus 



Send group of 5 music questions to program. 
New York 



CBS 



GENERAL GROCERY CO 



Manhattan 
Coffee 



Man on the 
Street 



MTWTFS 
3:30-3:45 pm 



Prize of S5; if interviewee misses, 
additional %S 



Send topical question to program with product 
label 



KMOX, 
St. Louis 



KAISER.FRA2ER CORP 



Cars 



Newscope 



TTSa 

r:30-7:45 pm 

Sunday 

S:45-9 pm 



1,360 prizes, new cars, cash, merchan- 
dise, etc., totaling $135,000 value 



Send product testimonial completed in 25 
words to program 



MBS 






KOONS JEWELRY CO 



Jewelry 



Lucky 
Money 



MTWTF 
7-7.15 pm 



$2 or more per telephone call; to 
jackpot if missed 



Listener repeats sentence heard on program. 
3 calls made during program 



LEVER BROS CO THOMAS 
i. LIPTON. INC DIV 



Tea 



.\rthur Godfrey' 
Talent Scouts 



Monday 
8:30-8:55 pm 



First prize $10,000; others totaling 
$15,000 



Send last line to product limerick with carton 
top to sponsor, N. Y. 



WFPG, 

Atlantic 

aty 



CBS 



LUDENS INC 



Coughdrops 



Strike It 
Rich 



Sunday 
10:30-11 pm 



Tickets to broadcast, chance for lis- 
tener to appear on show offering prizes 



Best letters why listener would like to "Strike 
It Rich" win wkly 



Candy 



Dr. 1. Q. 



Monday 
9:30-10 pm 



$200 weekly award for true-false ques- 
tions; $400 for biographical sketch 



Best set of 6 questions plus 2 wrappers, best 
sketch plus 4 wrappers, to program, Chi. 



CBS 



NBC 



METROPOLITAN LIFE 
INSURANCE CO 



Insurance 



Eric Sevareid, 
News 



MTWTF 
6-6:15 pm 



Health bookleU 



Free on request to program, e/o local station 



CBS 



PARTICIPATING 



Various 



Three 
Alarm 



MTWTF 
2:15-3:30 pm 



Money and merchandise prizes; grand 
prize every 13 weeks 



Contestants write station what time during 
program alarm clock will ring 



KMPC. 
L.A. 



Dreft 



Joyce 
Jordan 



MTWTF 
10:45-11 am 



25 daily contests, first prize $1,000, 
other merchandise prizes 



Send product testimonial completed in 25 
words with boxtop to program, Cinci. 



PROCTER AND GAMBLE CO 



Duz 



Truth or 
Consequences 



Saturday 
8:30-9 pm 



Cumulative stockpile of prizes such as 

Cadillac sedan, jewelry, home laundry, 

etc. 



Send testimonial re l.\mcr. Heart Assn. Uo Walking 

.Man, H'wood.; 3 wkly winners phoned during 

program to identify "Walking Man" 



NBC 



PRUOENTIAL INSURANCE 
CO OF AMERICA 



Insurance 



Family Hour 



Sunday 
5-5:30 pm 



Copies of talks by various distinguished 
guests 



Request to sponsor, Newark, N. J. 



CBS 



QUAKER OATS CO 



Aunt Jemima 
Ready .Mix 



Ladies Be 
Seated 



MTWTF 

2-2:15 pm,cst 



Steel combination batter spoon and 
can opener 



Send 10c and boxtop to .\unt Jemima, Chi. 



ABC 



RALSTON PURINA CO 



Ralston 
cereals 



Tom Mix 



MTWTF 
5:45-6 pm 



Tom Mix fingerprint set and identifica- 
tion bracelet 



Send 15c and boxtop to program, St. Louis 



ROBERTS JEWELRY CO 



Jewelry 



Morniog in 
Maryland 



MTWTFS 
6-9 am 



Baby ring 



Ring given daily for first listener sending in 
announcement of baby's first birthday 



RONSON ART METAL 
WORKS 



Lighters 



Twenty 
Questions 



Saturday 
8-8:30 pm 



Lighter to sender of subject used; if 

studio contestants stumped, grand 

prize of silver table lighter, matching 

cigarette urn, tray 



Send subject about which 20 questions may be 
asked, to program 



Institutional 



Metropolitan 
Opera 



Saturday 
2 pm to close 



National membership in Metropolitan 

Opera Guild, subscription to "Opera 

News" 



Send $4 to .Met. Opera Guild, N. Y. 



MBS 



WFBR. 

Balto. 



MBS 



ABC 



Home 
Permanent 



Give and 
Take 



Saturday 
2-2:30 pm 



(1) Various prizes. (2) Toni Home 
Permanent to one of pair of girl twins, 
chance at being featured in Toni ads 



(1) Write correct answers to questions missed 
by studio audience. (2) Toni set given for pnze- 
wioning photo of twins plus testimonial letter 



CBS 



WILLIAMSON CANDY CO 



Oh Henry! 



Detective 
Mysteries 



Sunday 
4:30-5 pm 



$100 reward from "True Detective 
.Mysteries" Magazine 



Notify FBI and magaiine of information lead- 
ing to arrest of crinunal named on broadcast 



MBS 



52 



SPONSOR 




750 FEET! 



In Buena Park, California, our new 
750-foot vertical antenna just completed 
literally puts us "way up in the clouds" 
for a better signal . . . even greater cover- 
age of the Pacific Southwest. It's keeping 
abreast of the latest electronic advance- 
ments and developments in AM, FM and 
TV that enables us to bring . . . the finest 
facilities . . . the best all-around broadcasting 
... to the Pacific Southwest. Keep your eye 
on KFI ... we keep our ear to the ground. 



NBC FOR LOS ANGELES 

640 KC CLEAR CHANNEL 
50,000 WATTS 



"-^ 



-•«tej«'" 





'IxjJviU ©.CJ^C^ft^inr^.^- 



REPHESEHTED- HATJOHALLY BY 

•EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



FEBRUARY 1948 



53 



HOW MST CM RADIO WORK? 

Habit is iiasii* iiiif iiiipaf;! iias!» itoeii as iiiiiiKMiiafe as 21 hours 



©Continuity is an essential for 
maximum impact through 
broadcast advertising. Habit, 
it has been pointed out time and time 
again, is the greatest single factor in 
building a listening audience. The steady 
growth in listening to vehicles that have 
been on the air for years is supposed to 
indicate that short-term campaigns are 
generally not good investments for adver- 
tisers. Nevertheless saturation broad- 
casting has an amazing history behind it. 
It was only through being able to reach 
America through a single broadcast that 
F.D.R., America's wartime Commander- 
in-Chief, was able to mobilize the nation 
following Pearl Harbor. The combination 
of the four networks and practically all the 
nation's independent stations delivered to 
the president the ears of virtually all who 
live within the 48 states. This airing was 
saturation at its highest intensity. There 
were other times when this great user of 
the broadcast medium also reached the 
nation in one broadcast, such as his 
famous "We have nothing to fear but fear 
itself" address during which he announced 
the closing of the banks. No other means 
of communication could deliver a message 
to millions of people at one time. No 
other medium could saturate a nation 



with an appeal within the span of one half 
hour. 

True, the saturation broadcast in itself 
did not deliver the audience. It was a 
state of mind, conditioned b>' extraordin- 
ary events and made tense by expecta- 
tion, that brought three-quarters of the 
nation to its radios. The closest possible 
commercial equivalent of the fate-of-the- 
nation feeling is created by promotion, 
collected upon through saturation broad- 
casting. It's essential to the success of 
one-time events — the introduction of a 
new product or the building of an audi- 
ence for a motion picture, circus, ice show, 
touring live theater attraction, or indus- 
try show or exhibit. It has been used at 
times to rebuild acceptance for a product 
or to counteract a competitor's campaign 
in other media. 

Saturation is difficult to accomplish on 
a national basis. Lucky Strike's six-week 
900-station saturation campaign that cost 
$1,000,000 nearly drove Lillian Selb, 
Foote, Cone & Belding timebuyer, crazy. 
In many cases the ability to secure time 
at all depends upon the stations' recogni- 
tion of the product or occasion as quasi- 
public service. Blocks of spots are also 
often cleared for advertisers in the fond 
hope that cooperation during a saturation 



campaign will open the door to continuing 
business from the client or the agency. 

The Duane Jones agency in introducing 
Alligator cigarettes in new territory uses 
as many stations and as many good spots 
as they can buy. Geyer, Newell and 
Ganger is doing the same thing on P. 
Lorillard's' king-size Embassy cigarettes. 
G. N. & G. try for semi-saturation for 13 
weeks, spending about $500 each week per 
station for 35 spots. This is tapered off 
after the first 1 3 weeks to five or six spots 
per week. 

Such a campaign is of course but a drop 
in the budget of a saturation campaign for 
a motion picture showing in a big town. 
Twentieth Century's showing of Gentle- 
man's Agreement in Boston, Mass., was 
preceded by a three-day campaign on 
WORL, WEE I, WNAC, and WBMS with 
a total of 400 spots and a budget of $2,000. 

These saturation campaigns by motion 
picture companies who place as many as 
165 spots on one station in one week are 
no shots in the dark. They save bad pic- 
tures like Duel in the Sun and Forever 
Amber from showing to empty seats. 
They also help a picture like Walter Mitty 
to draw an audience of more than Danny 
Kaye fans alone. Mitty's campaign used 
the shortest commercial time segment 



Radio Filled International Harvester's Midway with Farmers 



Appeal oF WBBM radio artists Filled show tent at IH Centennial 



^ :i 






IH tirned tract outside Chicago's Soldiers' Field into giant exhibition area tor us 1 00th Anniversary, Broadcasting brought 500.000 to it 



known to have been sold, three-second 
announcements, which asked "Are you a 
Mitty?" They were used wherever they 
could be bought in metropolitan areas and 
ran before the regular spot campaign on 
the picture started. Saturation through 
teaser announcements isn't attempted 
very often, but it can do a startling job, 
and can drive listeners to the box office or 
to buying the product even more depend- 
ably than straight commercial selling 
announcements. 

Normal campaigns in one city area go 
to one station. Fleischmann's Vienna 
Model Bakery, in Philadelphia, uses a 



five-minute program on WCAU, Monday 
through Friday, 9:40-9:45 a.m. When it 
placed its advertising account with Gray 
and Rogers in the Quaker City, that 
agency decided that the Fleischmann 
products had to be repackaged so that 
rheir baked goods would have both eye 
appeal and a family relationship. The 
line was repackaged. To create an aware- 
ness of the new wrappers 15-second sing- 
ing jingles were placed on the three other 
network outlets in town— KYW (NBC), 
WFIL(ABC),andWIP(MBS). WCAU 
is CBS. The spots were run three times 
daily from January 12 to February 10. 



Thousartds, invited by radio, came in from many midwest states for celebration education 




Visual saturation was also attempted via 
car cards, truck posters, wall banners, 
light pulls, shelf cards, and newspaper 
advertising. All of the visual campaign 
tied into the line in the jingle that was 
musically emphasized — "the bright new 
package." 

The Fleischmann product was in most 
stores ready for the consumer request for 
it inspired by the advertising. Saturation 
advertising must be supplemented by 
saturation distribution. The Duane 
Jones campaign for Alligator cigarettes 
lost some of its impact in certain cities 
because the product wasn't available in 
many stores. 

Touring theatrical attractions, circuses, 
and ice shows all use the saturation tech- 
nique. So important is it with the 
nation's number one circus, Ringling 
Bros., Bamum and Bailey, that Bev 
Kelley, the man who handled its broad- 
cast publicit)', later became the advertis- 
ing and publicity head of the "greatest 
show on earth." All the big touring ice 
shows, including Shipstads & Johnson's 
Ice Follies and Sonja Henie's Hollywood 
Ice Revue, place as many spots on as many 
stations as they can buy within their 
budgets. 

(Please turn to page 62) 



55 




Dinih Shore— Col. 37952 . Sammy Keyc— Vic. SO-8601 
Billy Eckrtine—MGM 10097 . Erskln* Hawkins— Vie. S0-S470 
Dinah Washington — Merc. 8050 . Gladys Palmer — Miracle 104 
Georjia Gibbs— Mai. 18013 . Brooks Brothers— Dec. 48049 

LErS BE SWEETHEARTS AGAIN ca..beiiPors 

Margaret Whiting— Cap. 15010 . Victor Lombardo— Mai. 7869 

Blue Barron— MGM 10121 . Shep Fields— Musicnlt 585 

Guy Lombardo-Monica Lewis — Dec. 84898 . Bill Johnson — Vic. 80-8591 

Billy Leach— Merc* 

LOVE IS SO TERRIFIC Men.) 

Les Brown— Col. 38060 . Art Lund— MGM 10186 

Helen Carroll A Satisfiers— Vic. 80-8678 . Ernie Felice Quartet — Cap. 486] 

Vic Damone — Mercury* 

MADE FOR EACH OTHER (Peeo 

Buddy Clark-Xavier Cugat— Col. 37939 . Monica Lewis— Sis. 1 5105 

Enric Madriguera- Nat. 9088 . Machito — Cont. 9003 . Rene Cabel— Dec. 50006 

Dick Farney— Mai-7873 . Desi Arnai— 80-8550 

Maris Lina Landin— Vic. 70-7345 . Ethel Smith-Bob Eberly— Dec. 84272 

MY RANCHO RIO GRANDE h.w.i c i.e ion) 

Jack Smith— Cap. 473 . Shep Fields— Musicratt 522 . Dick Jurgens— Col. 38027 

Ken Carson — Variety* . Vicloi Lombardo — Mai.* 

Esquire Trio — United Artist 114 , Murphy Sisters — Apollo* 



Ray Dorey— Mai. 1186 
Frances Langford — Mercury* 



PASSING FANCY bmd 

Vaughn Monroe— Vic. 20-2573 
Johnny Johnstone— MGM 10127 
Ray Anthony — Tune-Disk' _^_ 

TERESA Duchess) 

Dick Haymes- Andrews Sisters— Dec. 24320 . Kay Kysei — Col. 38067 

Jack Smith — Cap. 484 . Vic Damone — Mercury 5092 . Wilhelmina Gary — Click* 

Do Re A Me Trio — Commodore' . TTiree Blaies — Exclusive* 

WHY DOES IT HAVE TO RAIN ON SUNDAY johnsone) 

Freddy Martin— Vic. 20-2557 . Snooky Lanson- Mere. 5082 

Milt Herlh T.io— Dec.' . Beale St Boys— MGM' . Denny Day— Vic. 20-2377 

You're Gonna Get My Letter In The Morning aondon) 

Guy Lombardo-Mary Osborne — Dee.* . Adrian Rollini — Bullet* 

ZU-BI CRoP"bllc) 

Sammy Kayc— Vic. 80-2420 . Vietoi Lombardo— Maj. 7263 
Tommy Tuekci — Col.* . Art Moonty — MGM* 

*Soon lalibe rektued. 



BROADCAST MUSIC INC. 



580 FIFTH AVENUE . NEW YORK 19, N. Y 
NEW YORK . CHICAGO • HO 



HOLLYWOOD 



56 



MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

{Continued Jrom page 45; 

after" method, if it is carefully planned in 
advance. 

Obviously, if the spot program can be 
isolated from other phases of promotion 
more precise measurements of its effec- 
tiveness can be secured. 

Further, if it is used in relation to a'new 
product or one which has a new message 
to tell consumers, the trend of impact can 
be detected more readily. 

C. W. MacKay 

Vp in charge of research 

Kenyan & Eckhardt, Inc., New York 

^HPIP^^^^I with spot pro- 
^g^ ^^^H grams on an aware 
^Kl ^^ ^^H station can cer- 
Hm ^SIT' ^^ tainly determine 
^1 i M not only the popu- 

^^T ^fl '^rity and impact 

^^k ^B "f those programs. 

^^Blu,^ ^M t>ut also whether 

HHb JB the time and copy 

I . he is using are 

j right. It's all done with mail-pulls. 
I A good station will have figures on 
audience composition for most hours of 
the broadcasting day; that will tell him 
who listens. Rating histories will tell him 
how many of those people listen at the 
times he has bought. Records of previous 
mail-pulls the offers and the copy used 
to present them can provide the impact 
of certain programs on a known audience. 
The advertiser buys either an estab- 
lished local program, or part of it; a tran- 
scribed show which he puts into his time; 
or a new show idea the station builds for 
him. The station already knows the 
popularity of its time and the reaction of 
listeners based on the programs it has 
offered at those times. If the advertiser 
buys this sort of package, the station can 
I tell him within about 10 per cent the 
response he'll get to any kind of mail offer 
. he will make. 

He can offer samples of his product; he 
I can offer a bargain of his regular size for 
proof of purchase and "10 cents to cover 
cost of mailing and handling"; he can run 
a contest with anything from local movie 
tickets to motor cars as prizes. If he has 
more than one show on a station, he 
merely keys his offers. If he wants to ex- 
periment with several broadcast times, he 
can move his program or his money 
around the station, trying it for a week or 
so at each spot, and then decide upon the 
time that pays off best. 

Henry Poster 
Research director 
WNEW, \eic York 

SPONSOR 




10 Spon 



in 10|^ks 

. . means RHYME DOBS PAY 



Ten weeks after "Rhyme Does Pay," started on 
WRVA, it was (and is) doing business for ten 
participating sponsors. 

These ten buyers of radio time and talent have 
put their sales campaigns on "Rhyme Does Pay" 
because it does just that. It pays! 

Every weekday morning from 8:15 to 9:00 a. m., 
Emcee Ray Kennedy plays platters picked by 
listeners with the best knack for rhyming their 



requests. Each winner makes a dollar. And each 
sponsor makes sales! (And lots of dollars! ) 

If you are looking for big profit in WRVA's billion 
dollar market, call us or Radio Sales. We'll show 
you how to make "Rhyme Does Pay" pay off for vou. 



Richmond and Morfolk, Va. 
Represented by Radio Sales 



WRVA 







58 



SPONSOR 



II k 



noil -listening 
is YOUR problem 



llaflio M'l «»\vn4'rN %%'lio «lon*l 
turn ilioir ni^In i»n r4^;:(iilarly 

i%^hat llioy'ro iiiiNj>$iiig 



ReasoHN for Xoii-Li$«teningt: i;%akiiig to O a.m. 


WHY? 

• 


QUARTER-HOURS 

FOR WHICH REASON 

WAS MENTIONED 


PER CENT* OF 
NON-LISTENING 
(AWAKE) TIME 


Too busy, work interferes, radio distracts from 
work, etc. 


915 


53.7 


Resting, somebody sleeping or ill. noises inter- 
fere, etc. 


352 


20.6 


Too early 


125 


7.3 


Don't like available programs, not interested, or 
•don't know about programs available 


301 


17.7 


General dislike of radio 


35 


2.1 


Don't like commercials 


38 


2.2 


' ^0 radio available 


164 


9.6 


*Iot at home 


117 


6.9 


Don't think about it — never listen 


71 


4.2 


Miscellaneous environmental reasons 


43 


2.5 


Usually listen, but not today 


19 


1.1 


Not in mood 


12 


0.7 


Don't bother — too lazy 


4 


0.2 


Poor quality reception 


2 


0.1 


tAs given in the .\udience Surveys, Inc.. Boston study for the Katz agency. 

■^Adds to more than ion.0% since respondents often mentioned more than one reason for non-listening. 



over-all 



fEBRUARy 1948 



During the month when liS' 
tening is at its height (Feb- 
ruary), on the evening and at the mo- 
ment during that evening when the 
greatest number of radio homes have 
their receivers turned on (Tuesday 
9:15-9:30 p.m.), only 49.5 per cent of 
America's homes are listening to their 
radio sets. During the last recorded lis- 
tening peak (February 1-7, 1947) average 
listening per evening period was only 
34.3 per cent.* While this 34.3 per cent 
were listening there were 47.1 per cent 
more American families at home and 
available for listening. 

Thus during the evening broadcasting 
was reaching fewer than half of the homes 
that it could have. Radio has availa- 
ble to it the greatest audience that 
any advertising medium has ever hoped 
to reach. While 90.4 per cent of America's 
families had a radio receiver in 1946, as 
1948 opened its eyes this figure had 
grown to 94.3 per cent (latest confiden- 
tial Census Bureau computation). No 
other advertising medium has ever even 
claimed this potential. The 49.5 per cent 
Tuesday listening figure is a Hooperating 
but other ratings (Nielsen Radio Index 
and some diary studies, made the same 
week) are within 1 per cent of this 
figure. 

Non-listening has not been of interest 
to agencies or sponsors. When NBC pre- 
sented the results of the study (1944) 
made by Lazarsfeld-Schneider on a.m. 
non-listening (it was called The Social 
Psychology of the Morning Audience) it 
created as little ripple as a summer breeze 
on an inland lake. As a consequence 
NBC did very little with it. 

Later WNBC, under Jim Gaines, had 
the Psychological Corporation make a 
study of non-listening (though it was 
used by Gaines basically as a blueprint 
for a new program structure since non- 

*ThU coters nil listening beliveen 6 and 11 p.m. 

59 



listening in general is not his problem). 
It was called Morning Radio Habits of 
New Yorkers. 

Recently the Katz Agency, station 
rep resent at Ives who have an iinusiiall>' 
keen sense of industry responsibility, com- 
missioned Audience Surveys, Inc.,t to 
study the listening habits of the 5 to 9 
a.m. audience. This, after pilot studies 
in Nassau County (Long Island, N. Y.) 
and New York Cit>', resulted in a more 
extensive project in Boston. 

The result of these thrt^^ studies has 
been to rouse the National Association of 
Broadcasters to think in terms of making 
non-listening its major research project 
in 1948. They have not, unfortunately, 
aroused even the keenest of sponsors to 
any unusual activity. Despite general 
recognition that all three parts of broad- 
cast advertising, sponsor, agency, and 
broadcaster, have a tripartite responsi- 
bility for the health of the medium, both 
agencies and sponsors generally feel that 
getting the people to turn their sets on 
is entirely the job of the broadcasters. 

What has caused most advertisers to 
avoid the audience-building routine is 
the cost on the way up. The daytime 
Fred Waring program on NBC is one 
attempt to increase the sets in use in the 
morning. It is a direct result of the 
Lazarsfeld-Schneider study. 

Dr. Lazarsfeld divided women (a.m. 
audience) into three groups (excluding 
employed women, women unavailable 
due to deafness or inability to understand 
English, or due to illness in the family). 
These three groups reported their radio 
habits in the following manner: 

Serial listeners 29 % 

Other listeners 34% 

A.M. non-listeners 37%* 

*Tftese women listened in the nflernoon or evening, sf^ent 
an average of 1.9 hours daily at their radios. 

While 63 per cent of all women at home 

^(iene Katz is a major finanritil factor in Audience 
Surveys. Inc. 



listenened in the mornings, naturally not 
all this number listened all the time. 
The importance of turning the third 
group into listeners is therefore apparent. 

Lazarsfeld's research uncovers the 
(act that the largest portion of the non- 
listeners (58 per cent, or 21 per cent of all 
available women) was composed of 
women who were unable to listen while 
doing something else. His contention is 
that these women can be made part of 
the listening audience IF part of radio is 
programed for them — with shows that 
do not require continuous listening. 
They enjoy broadcasting but they can't 
do two things at the same time. Lazars- 
feld admits that it is not easy to plan 
programs for this group. 

In Lazarsfeld's study it is concluded 
that the greatest area in which listening 
can be increased is among the 34 per 
cent of the women who are not serial 
listeners. 

These women, to quote the doctor, are 
"the kind of women who want to be 
cheered up or soothed, comforted; they 
want radio to divert them from their own 
problems." They are also women who 
are interested in self-improvement. La- 
zarsfeld is careful to stress that these 
women are not yearning for public 
service programs. They want programs 
which give them useful tidbits of informa- 
tion — not theoretical or academic dis- 
cussions. Mary Margaret McBride, 
Kate Smith, Professor Quiz, and Margaret 
Arlen have the types of programs which 
appeal to these "other listeners." 

Lazarsfeld's study reveals that radio 
audiences are built up of people who are 
psychologically akin and cut across con- 
ventional income, educational, and occu- 
pational classifications which are familiar 
in market research. There are one-track 
minds in all income and educational 
groups. They are, pointed out Dr. L., a 
very important part of the listening audi- 



ence. The very same factor that makes 
them concentrate on their work makes 
them concentrate on their listening — 
when they listen. 

It is the psychological kinship of 
groups of listeners, as pointed out by 
Lazarsfeld, that has made block pro- 
graming such a successful device for 
both independent stations and networks. 
It was this kinship that militated 
against vaudeville's ever achieving per- 
manence as part of the entertainment 
world — ^and the same variety formula of 
presenting unrelated acts failing to 
attract great audiences on the air. Inde- 
pendent stations that block-program 
have discovered that variety loses listen- 
ers. Retaining the same mood of music or 
program is essential to continuing suc- 
cessful servicing of an audience. 

Lazarsfeld, in endeavoring to estab- 
lish a psychological bias for women listen- 
ers, determined that the types of pro- 
grams which are furthest apart are day- 
time serials and music. The program 
type closest to all other types of enter- 
tainment, as his research uncovered it, 
is audience participation, which is no 
doubt the reason for the continued suc- 
cess of Breakfast Club and Breakfast in 
Hollywood as well as Queen for a Day and 
Heart's Desire, to mention four daytime 
audience participation shows. 

Nearest to daytime serial audiences in 
listening groups are women commenta- 
tors and the closest to music is news. 
Independent stations' marriage of music 
and news, according to the Lazarsfeld- 
Schneider reports, stands upon a good 
psychological foundation. That is why 
many stations programed in the WNEW 
(N. Y.) manner throughout the country 
are first during certain daytime hours. 

One of Lazarsfeld's conclusions on 
combating non-listening is the promotion 
of non-serial daytime programs. Be- 
(Please turn to page 66) 



I.4»«*aii4>ii 4»f »i*livilv 11114I 4*oiii*iir- 



r«>iif railio lisl 


oiiiii;^ 




Location 


Time Spent in Room 


Radio Listening 




% of Time Awake 


% of Time in Room 


KITCHEN 


62 0% 


29.756 


BEDROOM 


21 1 


24 7 


LIVING ROOM 


3 5 


46 3 


DINING ROOM 


2 1 


42 9 


OTHER ROOMS 


6 6 


17 5 


AWAY FROM HOME 


5 3 


5 7 



l*4^r«*oiit tinio ill r«K»iii!>i %%Jlli aiic< 
\vifli«»iil radios 



location 



ROOM WITH RADIO 
ROOM WITHOUT RADIO 
NOT INDICATED 

TOTAL 



Listening 



^5 A% 

11 5 



26 9% 



Xon-Listening 



65 4"^ 



Total 



23.3% 38 7% 

42 1 53 6 

I 
7 7 



100 0% 



i 



60 



SPONSOR 



ak 




WOOING THE WOMEN... 



WWJ-TV, Detroit's first and only teievhion station, is busy th«se days wooing 

and winning the women's audience. Pictyred above is Jean McBride, Home Institute 

« 

Director of The Detroit News, in her populor, Philco-sponsored household economics 
program. Other current, diversified WWJ-TV shows aimed specifically at v/ofnen 
« include a fashion program sponsored by the J. I. Hudson Company, Detroit's 

largest deportment store; the John Powers Charm School, featuring hints on 
etiquette, make-up, etc.; end the WWJ-TV Television Party, a mirthful audience 
participation show emanoting from WWJ-TV's large studio cuditorium. 

Each of these sponsored progroms Is proof of the selling eflrectiveness of television, 
and of the programming accomplishments of WWJ-TV in its first year of operaticm. 




FIRST IN DETROIT 



Owned and Op»roted by THE DETROIT NEWS 



National Reorescgfofi'vei: THE GEORGE P. HOILINGBERY COMPANY 



Upj=w 



Associalt FM Sfalion WWJFM. 
Attociale AM Station WWl 



FEBRUARY 1948 



61 



WASH ON THE AIR 

{Continued from patie 28) 
washing machine industry was o( tlic 
opinion that a machine could not be sold 
in the price range in which Bendix was 
placed. Bendix proved that a better 
product, better produced and better pro- 
moted, will command a premium price. 

Bendix Wash on the Air programs are 
proving that it's possible to sell appliances 
in the over-$200 bracket on the air —and 
that broadcasting can pay off in direct 
sales. It also answers the question of 
what one-time broadcasts can do. 

One dealer who heard that another was 



holding a Wash on the Air promotion in 
his area, invited his prospects in to hear 
the broadcast, and demonstrated the 
Bendix in his store while the air demon- 
stration was being broadcast. 
He sold Bendix automatics, too. 



SATURATION BROADCASTING 

(Cuntiniied Jrom page 55) 

Both circuses and ice shows have also 
turned to TV for promotion although 
none of them have as yet bought time on 
the medium. They make such good visual 
air entertainment that at present TV sta- 



i 



WMBR 



JACKSONVILLE 
CBS in North Florida 

Represented by Avery — Knodel 



15 now 



I 



5000 
WATTS 



62 



tions scan them "for free." All the shows 
are seen not once but several times on the 
visual air during their stay in one city. 
It's a bit difficult to telecast them and not 
a\sa put the live music on the air but they 
have been able to do this by clever shifting 
from live applause to recorded music back 
at the studio. 

Curtis Publishing's Holiday saturates 
certain areas with each issue. The vaca- 
tion publication usually spotlights a sec- 
tion of the country, and expects that 
section to buy more copies per capita than 
any other territory. When they spot- 
lighted the state of Washington they went 
into Seattle on KJR, KIRO, KO.MO, for 
a three-day campaign, 10 announcements 
per station at an average cost of $20 each. 
Their radio budget for the effort was $600. 
They sold 20,000 copies of the issue in the 
area; the usual monthly newsstand sales 
in Washington are 5,000. Thus the 
localized three-day campaign increased 
normal sales by 300 per cent. The cam- 
paign wouldn't have been any good with- 
out the Washington issue but it took radio 
to bring the news of the issue to Washing- 
tonians. The impact of the 30 announce- 
ments was traceable, since newsstand 
vendors reported that buyers of the maga- 
zine said they had "heard about it on the 
radio." 

Bab-0 (B. T. Babbitt) opens doors in 
new markets by supplementing its two 
network programs {Lxira Lawton, NBC, 
and David Harum, CBS) with intensive 
spot campaigns. Embryonic campaigns 
are closely-guarded secrets because they 
tip off their competition just where an 
intensive sales attack is about to be made. 
An outstanding example of saturation 
during the last quarter of 1947 was the 
radio promotion of International Har- 
vester's Centennial Exhibit in Chicago. 
While announcements were carried on 
WIND, WLS, and pther stations, the 
Prairie Farmer carried a two-color page 
ad, 176 24-sheet poster locations were 
used in Chicago and suburbs, 15 30-by-3- 
feet banners on elevated structures, and 
1 1 ,000 posters and car cards were used on 
buses and trains. 

WBBM, however, carried the major 
burden of publicizing the 16-day indus- 
trial carnival. It supplied all the talent 
for shows which were given in a 347-foot 
tent which was part of the International 
Harvester eight-acre exhibit. Each day 
during the 16 days of the exhibit, WBB.M 
broadcast a half hour from the tent as 
well as entertained the visiting farmers. 
They came from as far away as Georgia 
and Texas but the great majorit>' came 
from eight states all within the listening 
area of Chicago's stations. State days 

SPONSOR 



INDIANA (Pa.) IS 100% 




lo MORE THAN 10,000 men, women and 
children, Indiana (Pa.) is back home. That's 
where they spent $17 million at retail in 
1946, and that's where they listen faithfully 
to KDKA (whose nighttime BMB rating in 
Indiana, and throughout Indiana County, 
is 100%). 

In the BMB 90-100% class, KDKA has 

19 daytime counties and 24 nighttime coun- 
ties., a generous portion of the Pittsburgh 
market, two-thirds of whose people liye out- 
side the cit)' limits. Altogether, BMB credits 
the nation's pioneer station with 1,159,910 
daytime families and 1,303,520 nighttime 
families. The facts of this amazing listener- 
ship are contained in "The Pittsburgh Stor} ." 
You don't have a copy? Write, by all means, 



KDKA, Pittsburgh. 50,000 watts. NBC affihate. 
Westinghouse Radio Stations Jnc ('KEX, KYW, 
WBZ, WBZA, WOWO, KDKA). Repre- 
sented nationally by NBC Spot Sales— ffVf^^ 
except KEX. KEX represented nationally " ^^ ' 
by Free & Peters. 



FEBRUARY 1948 



63 




,t0o««s" in Brooklyn 



(IOWA) 



. . . but most of its population (1406, 
including the new schoolteacher) teams 
up to play ball with WMT for good 
radio listening? Like a thousand other 
communities, Brooklyn listens to WMT 
more ihan any other Eastern luiia 
Station. 

WiVlTland's twin markets — rural and 
urban — deliver the highest per capita in- 
come audience in the U.S.A. Last year 
lowans garnered close to $2 billions from 
farming — and nearly as much from 
manufacturing. 

Reach both these potent markets on 
WMT — Eastern Iowa's only CBS outlet. 
Aik the Katz man for details. 



■v>cs«».. 



■*»VAC-. 



. W>ftNSX. .^x^"^ 



WMtT 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Walts 600 K.C. Doy ond Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 




Highest in Town 

Milli an 8 a. in. lo 10 p. in. 

33.0* 
HOOPER 

share of andienee 

(total time rated [teriod) 

WAPO-Chattanooga-WAPO-FM 

I I 5 <» N r II I-; 1) I A I, 

Oct. -Nov., 1947 Hooper Station Listening Index 



«4 



were proclaimed when it became evident 
that train loads would visit the exhibit 
from these states. The greatest state day 
naturally was that of Illinois when 65,000 
people visited the exhibit. Indiana day 
was a close second with 60,000. On 
October 19, peak attendance day, 8,000 
passed through the entrance gates be- 
tween three and four p.m., the period dur- 
ing which WBBM's entertainment unit 
was entertaining in the special show tent. 
International Harvester paid WBBM 
$25,000 for time and talent. Sixteen half- 
hour broadcasts were made direct from 
the show tent and all the talent was 
WBBM's. This use of radio talent to 
"bring 'em in" plus daily broadcasts from 
the exhibit halls themselves is using radio 
saturation from an entertainment as well 
as advertising angle. Harvester is on 
NBC with its regular broadcast Sunday 
afternoon, Harvest of Stars, but WBBM's 
time and talent package was the best pre- 
sented to them and they used this CBS 
Chicago station for the major part of 
their job. 

The objective was to bring 250,000 
visitors to the exhibit. Over 500,000 
turned out. One hundred thousand rural 
residents from nearby states visited the 
Centennial and while IH will not release 
sales figures the exhibit was under the 
direction of M. F. Pechels, consumer rela- 
tions director of the great farm machinery 
corporation and was a good-will, not a 
direct selling, effort — sales in states that 
could be affected by the exhibit were up 
25 F»er cent during November (over 
November 1946). 

Saturation broadcast advertising is a 
field all its own. Sponsors desiring to try 
the device have a long and difficult row to 
hoe. Short term schedules are almost cer- 
tain to be allotted, as several station 
representatives point out, dog availabili- 
ties. Each campaign is actually a selling 
job on the stations, to get the right time. 
Then it's a job to make certain that what 
the saturation job has to sell is available 
for sale. It's no simple matter to figure 
out just when distribution of a new 
product is ready for that saturation push. 
It's a fine art figuring out just how long 
before an event the broadcast fanfare 
should be started. 

Repetition remains an advertising first 
principle. Broadcast saturation adver- 
tising doesn't ignore the principle. It just 
says what it has to say many times in a 
day instead or in a week or a month. It 
sets out to establish a buying habit 
quicker because the specific advertiser 
needs action tomorrow, not next month. 

SPONSOR 



^^^K^^^0^^^r-^ 




Paul W. Morency, Vice-Pres.— Gen. Mgr. Walter Johnson, Assistant Gen. Mgr.— Sis. Mgr. 

WTIC's 50,000 waMs represented nationally by Weed & Co. 



FEBRUARY 1948 



6S 



NON-LISTENING 

{Continued Jrom page 60) 

cause daytime serials have had such a 
prominent place in morning schedules, 
there is a strong tendency for women to 
exaggerate the proportion of serials in 
broadcast station schedules and know 
very little abf)ut other programs. He 
uses this statement to underline the need 
for program promotion. He further 
emphasizes the need for spreading word 
of what is available for dialing, with the 
following information: "The majority 
of these women* knew of no morning 
programs other than those they usually 



listen to and it is clear that listening 
habits are strong habits which can be 
changed most easily by thoroughly pub- 
licizing changes in program schedules." 

Briefly, Dr. Lazarsfeld in his morning 
study arrived at the conclusions that to 
cut down non-listening it is necessary to 
increase the number of non-serial pro- 
grams on the air, that there is a need for 
programs which do not have to be lis- 
tened to continuously, and that when new 
programs become available they must 
be publicized to increase listening. 

While the Audience Surveys, Inc., 
study for Katz was more limited than 



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the l-azarsfeld-Schneider Investigation, 
and covered only the hours between 5 
and 9 a.m., it also pointed out strongly 
that the inability to listen while other- 
wise occupied was an important consid- 
eration in the high percentage of morning 
non-listening among women. The rea- 
sons given by 53.9 per cent of the women 
for non-listening were "too busy, work 
interferes, radio distracts from work, 
etc." Programing before 9 a.m. is defi- 
nitely of the type that does not require 
concentrated listening and listening edu- 
cation via promotion is the need for these 
hours rather than a change of content. 
Boston revealed that "general dislike 
of radio" accounted for only 2.1 per 
cent of the non-listening time. It also 
revealed that almost the same per cent, 
2.2, didn't listen because of an expressed 
dislike for commercials. In WNBC's 
study dislike for commercials rated 
practically the same (2.3), as did "not 
interested." 

Although respondents to any radio 
survey are less likely to be negative on 
broadcasting than the same group would 
be if they were answering research ques- 
tions promulgated by a non-radio survey, 
nevertheless this tiny negative response 
to the medium itself is significent. 

Indicative of what early a.m. audi- 
ences want to hear is the Psychological 
Corporation report for WNBC "Old 
favorites" (music) leads the desired re- 
port with 24.6 per cent of those surveyed. 
.More news is desired by 16.9 per cent 
and news is the program type that most 
listeners want to keep. Of those surveyed 
28 per cent (and they were distributed 
throughout the five boroughs of New 
York and several counties of New Jer- 
sey) were insistent on keeping news in 
the morning schedules. 

In spite of the great number of stations 
serving the metropolitan New York area 
46.2 per cent of those surveyed reported 
that they didn't listen in the morning. 

Non-listening is largely the result of 
inertia— inertia among listeners, inertia 
among networks, stations, advertising 
agencies, and sponsors. The inertia 
among the listeners exists largely be- 
cause of the inertia among the other 
factors in broadcast advertising. It 
needn't take a Fred Waring show in- 
vestment ($18,000 a week) to rout non- 
listening. It can be done with low-cost 
shows well promoted. Reducing non- 
listening is everybody's business. It's 
more important than fighting for an 
audience that the other advertiser or 
station already has. 

* l'ho%t cmered by Ike Lazarsfetd-Schneider study. 



66 



SPONSOR 




NOW VOUR 



HSTE^AERS CAH 




Preset! ting A tn erica ^s 
Most Sensational New 

DISC JOCKEY 

5 Hours Weekly of Platter 

Spinning 




The Nations Foremost Composer and Band Leader Featuring 

TOP TUNES ON RECORDS, 

STORIES BEHIND DISC AND MUSIC MAKERS 

AND INTERVIEWS WITH FAMOUS STARS 

ON TRANSCRIPTIONS. 

When the Duke hits your city, you can count on a Personal Appearance. 
This ALL-STAR talent now available at rates low enough to meet station budget. 
The Duke Ellington Transcribed Disc Jockey Show CAN'T MISS — BUT YOU CAN. 

DON'T WAIT - YOU MAY BE LATE! 

Sold exclusively to one station in each city. 

A WMCA Artist Bureau Production Distributed Nationally By 



"/rvoT/z^ S. (l<roc/?rva/n^ 



19 EAST 53rd STREET 



RADIO 



NEW YORK. N Y. 



^ rile - \X ire or Phone Your Reservation NOV( 



r 



^ 



How do you turn an 

HONEST DOLLAR? 

In your own backyard you probably know the answer. That's the way it is with us. Here 
in Big Aggie Land, for instance, we know that farmers' cash comes from the sale of live- 
stock, poultry, crops and allied products. And, believe us, they are getting plenty of 
cash. For the first nine months of 1947 only, here are the U. S, Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics figures for average cash farm income in the five states in Big Aggie Land: 



SOUTH DAKOTA $7,213 

IOWA $8,122 

NEBRASKA $7,571 

NORTH DAKOTA $7,060 

MINNESOTA $4,918 



Average 
Cash Income 
Per Farm — 
First Nine 
Months of 
1947 Only 



We repeat, that money came from selling livestock, 
poultry and crops. Now take a look at the percentage oF 
the entire Five state total of those products found in the 
WNAX BMB area.* Big Aggie's share is 74% of a// 
cattle; 71 % of a// milk cows, 68% of a// swine, 72% of 
a// poultry and 73 9i of a// turkeys. Yes, Big Aggie 
reaches the big share of this rich five-state market. And 
WNAX is the favorite station with the farmers who make 
the kind of money shown above. Let us or a Kati man 
give you the details of a WNAX program that will sel 
your product in this tremendous market. 




SIOUX CITY - YANKTON AmUAUD with the AHHIRICAM broadcasting CO. 



68 



SPONSOR 



FES 



status re 



SELL 



OUT OF 



CITY FOLKS IN THE 



SOUTH'S No. 1 STATE 



WITHIN OUR 



Primary+Area 



• WINSTON-SALEM 

• GREENSBORO 

• HIGH POINT 

2.5 MV/M 

MEASURED 
SIGNAL 



210,200 PERSONS 

$179,469,000 in Retail Sales 
$283,685,000 in Buying Income 

We Lead Day and Night 
in This Big Tri-City Market 

Write for our BMB DATA FOLDER 



pori^ 



(^ WINSTON-SALEM (J) 

THE JOURNAL-SENTINEL STATIONS 



NBC 

AFFIUATC 

National Raprasantatlw* 

HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



Second Petry Spot Study 

After a four'month delay due to print' 
ing and other problems, the Edward Petry 
organization has released its second study 
of the effectiveness of spot announcement 
broadcasting. The figures, as indicated 
in Sponsor Reports last June, are lower 
than those reported in the first Audience 
Measurement of Spot Radio Commercials 
(as the Petry study is now called^. This is 
due to a change in reporting technique. 
Nevertheless the figures are testimony 
to the efficacy of spot announcements. 

According to the report, an average of 
25% of the residents of St. Louis heard 
the eight guinea-pig commercials during 
the first month of the survey (January 
1947) and an average of 32.6% heard 
them the second month (February 1947). 
The audience for the individual commer- 
cials ran, in January, from a high of 36% 
for Kools to a low of 1 5.2%, for Absorbine, 
Jr. In February the high was 42.8% for 
Trans World Airlines and the low, 21.5%, 
for du Font's Zerone and Zerex. Du 
Font's schedule was ten 1 5-second straight 
announcements in marginal time.* 

None of the schedules were extensive, 
the largest being Kools' with fifteen 
1 5-second commercials also in marginal 
time. Smallest schedule, as far as fre- 
quency is concerned, was used for Para- 
mount Pictures — four spots a week. 

Since stations and station time varied 
with each commercial and since the com- 
mercials themselves ranged from one- 
minute transcribed singing announce- 
ments to 1 5-second live talk, it's not- 
possible to compare conclusively the effec- 
tiveness of the eight air advertisements. 
For the record, the Petry report warns 
against comparisons not only between the 
eight commercials in this report but 
between this report and the first survey, 
due to difference in survey formula. 

Certain hints (if not facts) may be 
gathered from the report. Singing com- 
mercials do better than straight commer- 
cials. There were five of the former and 
each was heard by 27.5% of St. Louis 
residents in January and 34.2% in Febru- 
ary. The non-singing announcements 
were heard by an average of 22.8% of 
St. Louis in January and 27.9% in 
February. In other words, musical spots 
gathered 4.7% more audience in January 
and 6.3% more in February. 

The announcements were heard on 
practically all of the AM commercial 

{Please turn to page 70) 




D'ARTEGA 

and 

THE 
CAVALCADE 
OF MUSIC 

A gala musical prosram oF 
halMiour duration — available, 
on transcription, April 1. 

"The Cavalcade of Music" em- 
braces D'Artega and his 35- 
piece pop concert orchestra, 
assisted by a 16-voice chorus, 
with weekly guest shots by well 
known instrumental and vocal 
artists and outstanding novelty 
groups. 

"The Cavalcade of Music" 
series will run for 52 consecu- 
tive weeks. It is expressly de- 
signed for local or regional 
sponsorship. For full particulars 
and availability of territory 
write, phone or telegraph. 



LANG-WORTH 

INCORPORATED 
113 W. 57th St., New York 



FEBRUARY 1948 



69 



transcribed for Local and Regionol Sponsorship 




AMERICAS No. 1 BAND IN 
AMERICA'S No. 1 SHOW! A 
dazzling star-studded radio pro- 
gram. Fifty-two half hours 
available for local and region- 
al sponsorship at your single- 
city ()rorata cost. 



WRITE FOR AVAILABILITIES 




St. Louis stations. KXOK. KWK, WIL, 
KSD, and KMOX. Apparently the re- 
sults had nothing to do with the stations 
used, or if they had, correlation is im- 
possible from the report. St. Louis was 
chosen for the tests because the Petry 
station representative firm does not have 
a client in this market and therefore could 
not be accused of personal j^ain from 
underwriting the survey. 

There were 3,228 interviews completed 
for the report. Of these, 62.3% thought 
that broadcast advertising was "about 
right," 31.9'; thought the commercials 
tcx) long, \3% thought them too short, 
and 4.5% had no opinion. 

Although the scores for the singing 
commercials tested were higher than the 
straight talking ones, 43.1% of the re- 
spondents stated that they preferred 
spoken advertising. Only 29.5% voted 
for singing. There were 20.4% who 
wanted status quo. What they meant by 
this isn't indicated, if they were singing 
commercial fans, this would throw the 
weight to music. 

The only two suggestions for improve- 
ment of radio advertising that received 
over 9% of the votes were "Do not break 
into programs with commercials — have 
them at the beginning and end of the pro- 
grams," and "Make them shorter." The 
former had 9.7% of the votes and the 
latter 9.2%,. "No suggestion" gathered 
62.5%. 

*Marginal lime in this report is bejore H 4. M and iifler 
10:30 l\ M 



NEW YORK 
CHICAGO • HOtlYWOOD 



BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 

(Continued from page 19) 

cowboy, a cocked thumb, and "Howdy 
Podner" all over town. Any club or 
other service reported for discourteous 
treatment lose; its sign. KENO pro- 
motes the courtesy idea 100 percent. It 
even explains in the sign over its doorway 
that KENO is a "radio station." In 
Nevada some passersby otherwise would 
be sure to think that it was a place to 
play Keno. 

KTOK, Oklahoma City, fights juvenile de- 
linquency through "The Crusaders " an 
organization it established with Rev. 
Walter Gilliam. Practically every sta- 
tion in the nation has attacked this prob- 
lem at one time or another, as have the 
networks (CBS' The Eagle's Brood was a 
1947 highlight). KTOK's approach is 
different. The job of "The Crusaders" is 
to make religion real to youngsters and 
direct their energies into constructive 
channels. It has worked. Truancy has 
decreased over 42 per cent and juvenile 
court cases 7 per cent in one \ ear. Doing 
a job in a real cause week in and week 
out is good audience promotion. 




H 



fi 



ere are your Mgures, 
Mr. BMB. More proof 
that WPTF is the No. 
(T) Salesman in North 
Carolina, the So.uth's 
No. © State. /- 




WPTF'S BMB 

AUDIENCE 

457,840 FAMILIES 



'/; BMB 
Penetration 

90-1007, 
80-100% 
70-100% 
60-100% 
50-100% 
40-100% 
30-100% 
20-100% 
10-100% 



Day-time Audience 
Families 
180,280 
288.830 
303,080 
319.030 
368.5)0 
398.030 
41 1,850 
442.390 
457.840 



X' WPTF'S Audlerife Reprint con- 
taining Complete BMB audience In- 
formation b/ Counties and measured 
Cities available upon request. 




FRlL & PlTlRS ReirTse'n 



70 



SPONSOR 




DOLLAR VALUE 
DOLLAR RESULTS 



ON CFRB 




You can reach more listeners on CFRB — dollar for dollar — 
than any other Toronto station: 

And that statement is backed up by these facts. On CFRB, 
each advertising dollar buys: 

2,795 potential radio homes after 7 p.m. 
3,475 potential radio homes between 6-7 p.nt. 
5,195 potential radio homes at other times 

Yes, more LISTENERS for your dollar . . . more SALES for your 
dollar — because you reach a buying audience in a buying market! 
That's why advertisers stay with CFRB so long and so happily. 
They've found that they get value AND results — on CFRB! 



mm 



REPRESENTATIVES: 

UNITED STATES 

Adam J. Young Jr. incorporated 

CANADA 

All-Canada Radio Facilities Limited 



TORONTO 



Looking forward to the next twenty years! 



Mned and unsiifned 



/ldoe^Uliin<^ /Icf-etui^if, PeAA^am^e.1 Qltatt(^eA, 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Kilward A. Altshuler 
Tod Hyrcin 
<;corftc I. Chatfii'ld 
Richard I>ana 
K. (;. Kiscnmunfier 
SlicTman K. Kills 
James Kmniett 
Irank Kllnt 
Milchi'll (irayson 
llorace Ilaftcclom 
I.istir M. Horner 
Dale Jo.si'plison 
llerhert F. Kinft 

A. I.. Lleberman 
K. C Livingston 
Rohert A. McAnulty 
Si lire H. Nelson 
Martin J. Newman 
I'aiil Olafsson 
Rudolph Pecorinl 
(ierald I". Perry 
John II. Pii)ih 
Frank Ryhlick 
Bernard L. Sackett 
<;retchen Sharp 
John Sheldon 

B. Weston S telle 
K. (;. Stephens 
Theodore 1 . Toole 
Henry Turnbiill 

Travis Wells 



Ross. Gardner & White, L. A., publ. radio dlr 

N. W. Ayer. H'wood. 

Kenyon"& Eckhardi, N. Y. 

Foote, (;one & Beldinft. N. Y.. radio dept 

Dancer-Fltzfierald-Sample, Chi., tlmebuyer 

LaRoche & F.llis. .N. Y., special consultant 

McKlm. Toronto 

Craven & Hedrick. N. Y.. vp 

Montgomery Ward & Co, Chi., asst media dlr 

William B. Reminiiton, Springfield. Mass.. vp 



William B. Remington. Springfield. Mass.. \ 

Mayers. I.. A., acct exec 

Dancer-Fltzgerald-.SampIe. <;hi.. media dept 

Grant. N. Y. 

Rateliflfe. Dallas 

Frank Oxarart. I^. A. 

Ross. Gardner & White. L. A. 

Sackett & r*rince. N. Y.. partner 

Swaney. Drake & Bement. Chi. 

Geyer. Newell & (Janger. N. Y.. acct exec 

Stewart-Jordan. I'hila. 

MacLaren. Vancouver, mgr 

Booth. Vlckery & -Schwinn. N. Y., pres 

I.ennen & Mitchell, H'woou.. radio mgr 



.Same, asst TV dlr 

Same. TV. motion picture consultant 
.Same, vp 

Roy de Groot Consultants. N. Y.. radio script consultant 
.Swaney. Drake & Bement. (;hl.. radio dlr 
Diorama Corp of .America. N. Y.. sis. mdse dlr 
.Swaney. I>rake & Bement. Il'wood.. mgr 
.Same, radio dlr 

Kenyon & Eckhardt. N. Y.. TV producer 
Kiesewetttr. Wetterau & Baker. -N. Y., vp 
.Same, media dlr 

McAnulty & Josephson (new). Portland. Ore., partner 
.Same, partner, exec vp 
Peck. N. Y., media dlr 

J, Walter Thompson, Il'wood.. TV producer 
McAnulty & Josephson (new). Portland. Ore., partner 
.Same, partner, head 
Williams. L. A., vp 
John W. Shaw. Cni., media dlr 
Same, media dlr 

Perry Advertising (new). I>allas. head 
Marketers. I,. A., media, research dir 
.Same. TV head 

Bernard L. Sackett (new), Phila.. head 
I.eN'ally, Chi., media dlr 
.Same, asst group dir 
.Same, vp in chge new business 
Harold F. Stanfield. Montreal, acct exec 
Universal Labs. Fast Orange. N. J., pres 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, -N. Y., .Standard Brands acct 

exec 
Brisacher, Van Ncrden. L. .\.. acct exec 






Spxyt^icA, PeMxi4d.iiJei GUa*t(^e.l 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Siorrs J. Case 
Donald Lourie 
Marvin C;. Eunde 
William K. Shaughnessy 
Frederic J. Trump 



Tire distributor, \an .Nuys, Calif, 
(,)uaker Oats C:o, Chi., exec vp 
.Sears. Roebuck & Co, Chi, 
Chicago Daily 'I'imes, chief prom wxiter 
Royal Pharmacal Corp, N. Y., pres 



Sun Oil Co. Phila.. adv mgr 

Same, pres 

Same, adv mgr 

Nii-Fnamel Corp. Chi., adv mgr 

McCann-Erickson. N. Y.. Revlon Products acct exec 



yVeo/ A<f,e*u:'if' /lfift(Unt*ne.i^uiA> 



(Continued from pOi^e W^ 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT Of service) 



AGENCY 



Oiiaker Oats Co. Peterborough. Ont Quaker products Spitzer & Mills. Toronto 

Jack Ouinn Co. I afayette. Calif Garden supplies Ad Frii-d. Oakland 

Peter Reeves Inc. N. Y Groceiy chain Wiley, F razee & Ihivenpori, N, ^ , 

Regin Bros Co Mnpis Holsum bread Olmsted & Foley. Mnpls. 

Robinson Lloyds Ltd, N, Y Dry Iniptratr.r Champagne \Mley, F'razee & l>avenp<irt, N. Y. 

John .Schumacher Co. Alhambra. Calif Bottled honey \\ illiam Kestcr. H'wood. 

Southern C;ilifoinia State Dental .\ssn. L. A Trade assn Bishop. L. A 

Tivlor-Reed Corp .N. Y. Vlchv antacid pastilles St. Georges & Keyes. .N. 1 . 

Tillamook Count v Creamery Assn. Tillamook, Ore. Dairy products Botsford. Constantine & (iardner. Portland 

Trans-Atlantic Airlines. N. Y Air travel . J. R. Kupsick. N. \ . 

Vernon Building Supply Co, L. A Building supplies !i'- ':'• »"»'"li- '-• "^ 

Western Air Lines. L. A Air traveL . Buchanaii. L A. 

Wire Recording (xirp of America. N. Y Wirew ay Recorder Dcrland. N. "k 

Wisconsin Liquor Co, Milw Peter Pan wine Schoenfeld, Huber & Green, Chi. 



nil(K( ARV IVIS 




L.„ 



i4i. 



-rS!W 



5.<> 



.t.-^^ 



••c"''- 







•V^^' 



-.^•^MflflpM^^^ 



implemert _ 

of Argos, IndiqiK 



MERCHANTS in towns throughout Midwest America know WLS — 
and know the impact ^^"LS has on their customers. L. W. Ritter, pro- 
prietor of the Argos Implement and Supply Co., Argos, Indiana, is typical. 
"W'LS is the most popular station around here," he sa)s. "All the farmers 
listen to W'LS. In fact, everybody has some program they listen to on W'LS 
sometime during the day." 

Before opening his own firm last May, Mr. Ritter worked for 12 years 
in the town's hardware store. His customers are all personal friends — he 
knows them well from living with them and serving them this long time. 
We know these people, too. For 24 years W'LS has lived with them, ser\ed 
them. To listeners on farms and in towns thrciughout the Midwest, W'LS 
has given the information the\ need, the entertainment they want. 

Mr. Ritter's reaction to W'LS is typical of most small town merchants — 
and Argos is t\ pical of most small towns in the WLS area. It's a minor trad- 
ing center (population 1,190) 32 miles south of South Bend, in Marshall 
County. W'LS has the highest BMB in the county: 89*7^ day and 88% night. 
Total population is 25,935, with 78^^^ rural. Retail sales in 1946 were 181/2 
million dollars, 3'/? million of this in food sales, almost half a million in 
drug sales. 

Here's an important market — \et onl\ a small part of the market in- 
tensively covered b) W'LS. In Argos and Marshall County, as in many other 
Midwest communities, WLS is the leading radio station — most listeners, 

most influence . . . and the merchants know 
it. For further details about W^LS — its audi- 
ence, its market, its results — ask any John 
Blair man. 



t .« 



CHICAGO 7 



PRAIRIE 
FARMER 
STATION 



890 kilofycles, 50.000 wotts, Ameiican 
alTtliale. Represented by John Blair & 
Company. WIS covers intensively 288 
counties in tffiriois, Indiana, Michigan, 
Wisconsin and bordering states. 



AFFILIATED IN MANAGEMENT WITH THE ARIZONA NETWORK: KOY, PHOENIX . . . KTUC, TUCSON . . . KSUN, BISBEE-LOWELL-DOUGLAS 



FEBRUARY 1948 



73 



TV FILM 

{Continued from page 32) 

audience and was dropped only because 
the sponsor and agency decided upon a 
change of pace — wanted a newscast and 
wanted to present films of the Winter 
Olympics. These Western films being 
costume pieces for the most part do not 
seem as dated as other pictures released at 
the same time. They cost Chewy an 
average $150 a showing, which is far less 
than most feature-length pictures can be 
bought for when they are available. 

First-run foreign films, many of them 
with dialogue ghosted in English, will be 
available. The New York television audi- 



ence recently saw African Diary, a French 
fiKn with dubbed-in voices. The reaction 
generally was not gfxjd since the "voices" 
did not do a satisfactory job and the 
picture itself wasn't good enough to over- 
come that handicap. 

Film Equities, the firm that released 
African Diary, has some 150 feature- 
length pictures available for TV. The 
one-showing fees vary with each picture 
and with each market. They run from a 
floor of $ 1 50 to a present ceiling of $2, 500. 

Practically all stations scan serials. 
WRGB, Schenectady, the only television 
station to continue on air during the 
war, was also the first to present serials. 
Now Last of the Mohicans, Lost Jungle, 



WISCONSIN'S 

Aeiued^ ana 




AFFILIATED M. B. S 



1070 ^^ ^04^ cLi/ 

MADISON 3, WISCONSIN 
Represented by HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 



Fighting With Kit Carson, are making the 
rounds and will be seen on WPTZ, Phila- 
delphia; WWJ-TV, Detroit; WMAR, 
Baltimore; WBKB, Chicago; WTMJ-TV, 
Milwaukee; and WMAL-TV, Washing- 
ton, D. C. The last is presenting its 
serials five times a week, the rest once a 
week. These are not modem-costume 
serials and are therefore not affected by 
changing fashions. They're quickies, pic- 
tures made with a limited budget and a 
semi-name lead. They have relatively 
great viewing audiences among the 
children in television homes and amaz- 
ingly enough, no matter how corny, when 
they are aired at a time when adults are at 
home and available for viewing, they also 
have sizable adult audiences. This has 
been checked on the WCBS-TV presenta- 
tions of the serials on Sunday evenings at 
7:15 p.m., a special survey revealing 2^ 
men, 2 women, and 3 children per viewing 
set for the serials. In surveys made by 
NBC and CBS, feature-length motion pic- 
tures have rated almost as high as sports, 
which thus far have led all polls. Hun- 
dreds of respondents in these surveys have 
voted for feature-length pictures. 

Few pictures less than 10 years old arc 
available for release on the air. Most 
usable footage dates back not further than 



to produce the shows 
that 1,000,000 
North Jersey 
homes prefer. 



the radio station of the 



74 



SPONSOR 



I 



about 1932 but many pictures taken long 
before '32 are seen. Despite this, in a 
television home an old picture will out- 
draw a top'ranking radio broadcast. Ob' 
servers have been saying that the interest 
in old films on TV is traceable to the 
novelty of television and will die. Yet 
in a recent (December 1947) survey made 
by a leading rating organization, interest 
in film features in homes that have had 
receivers for five years or more is as high 
as it is in homes that had sets installed 
during the past 1 2 months. 

Sponsors are warned to make certain 
that any pictures they sponsor have been 
properly released for the medium. There 
have already been cases of television sta- 
tions' broadcasting films from home 
rental libraries that had not been cleared 
for air use. It's not expected that the 
players in the pictures will sue stations or 
sponsors but there is a possibility that the 
producers of the pictures will hold both the 
station and the sponsor responsible for 
any pirated showings, even if these show- 
ings were made by station and sponsor in 
the belief that the films had been properly 
cleared. 

Although Universal is as far as is known 
the only producing company actively 
reediting film for TV (their present assign- 










«« 






Offices in Chicago 

New York • Detroit 

St Louis • Los Angeles 

San Francisco 





JOHN 
BLAIR 

L COMPANY 







ment is said to be for U. S. Rubber), all 
the big four, despite official denials, have 
assigned a group in their film laboratories 
to cutting pictures that have rested on the 
shelves for over 10 years. These experi- 
mentally-cut pictures have been seen by a 
number of TV producers and are said to 
be better than much of today's available 
footage. Hollywood won't be caught 
short. 

Photographing live shows from the face 
of an iconoscope (TV receiving tube) has 
been experimented with for some time. 
Paramount and Eastman Kodak have 
cameras for that purpose, the latter's sell- 
ing fo{ /i$9,000 — with full sound equip- 



ment, $25,000. This will enable pro- 
ducers to film on an off-the-line basis as 
they do frequently in transcribing sound 
broadcasts. The problem in this case is 
establishing a union rate for the actors 
which will make it possible to release 
these films for showing all over the coun- 
try. Although this has been raised as an 
insurmountable barrier, no one at the 
stations or unions involved believe it is. 

Jerry Fairbanks is the only picture pro- 
ducer who is actually filming pictures for 
TV, doing a series of mysteries written 
and photographed for home consumption. 
The first of his television series is Public 
Prosecutor with John Howard, Anne 



BEPSESENIINC LEADING RADIO STATIONS 



EXTRA 
REAC 




GETS 

EXTRA 

RESULTS 



KXOK ALONE DELIVERS 

OVER *22.1% OF THE LISTENING AUDIENCE "MORNING • NOON 

NIGHT" IN THE THIRTY COUNTIES SURROUNDING ST. LOUIS 

Like the Mrs. illustrated above, KXOK has a long and aggressive reach 
which means extra sales for advertisers. It costs more to do business today 
which makes it imperative to increase sales volume. KXOK "reaches" and 
influences buying power in an area described by BMB as ll.i counties daytime. 
98 counties nighttime. 30 of these counties were surveyed* l>y KXOK and 
22.1% of the listeners make it a habit to tune to b'M) on the dial (bless that 
clear signal). In these counties live a million spenders, like the Mrs. in 
the illustration ... a plus market to St. Louis from which advertisers reap 
extra profits through KXOK's extra reach. 



^ 



Based on a com prehensile coincidentat 
survey in thirty counties surroutiditifi 
St. Louis, (her 109,000 calls uere 
completed by Ednard G. Duudy 
and Co. Ask your John Ulatr Man 
about this revealing survey . . . 
oJlfices conveniently located in 
\eu York, Chicago. Detroit. St. Louis. 
Los Angeles and San h'rancisco. 




ST. LOUIS 1, MO. . CHESTNUT 3700 
630 KG . 5000 WATTS • FULL TIME 

Owned and operated by the St. Louii Star-Times 



FEBRUARY 1948 



75 



Gwynnc, and Mary Beth Hughes. His 
rates are $1,500 for New York down to 
$300 for Schenectady. These fees include 
two repeat telecasts of the films in the 
same areas originally covered. A second 
series, a situation comedy serial, is sched- 
uled to go before the camera this month, 
and his third series, a daily juvenile pro- 
gram, will be filmed shortly. Public 
Prosecutor and the situation comedy 
series will have 17 episodes available, 
r^airbanks has set up a discount structure 
for sponsors using more than four sta- 
tions. 

Another Hollywood producer is Edgar 



Bergen who has made some films with his 
well-known puppets and has made several 
public announcements about his big plans 
for television. Details are still under 
wraps although Bergen is really serious 
about his producing for TV. 

Besides the entertainment film that will 
be available from film exchanges, it's esti- 
mated there are some 25,000 commercial 
and educational films which have been 
made for commercial purposes by big cor- 
porations and schools. Firms like General 
Motors have their own film departments. 
U. S. Steel spent $900,000 for a single 
full-color film on the making of steel. 




Jam Handy, rated by many as the leader 
in filming of industrial film, will make 
them for sptinsors at anywhere between 
$20,000 and $80,000 per reel. Ford made 
one not long ago that cost $250,000. 

Many of these industrial films, properly 
cut, make excellent television subjects. 
NBC has a regular program on the air in 
which industry films are aired as one-shot 
presentations. Organizations buying this 
spot for their pictures have run the gamut 
from the Chicago Tribune and the Ameri- 
can Telephone and Telegraph Company 
to Fir Door Institute and COj Fire Fight- 
ing Equipment. Viewer reaction has been 
uniformly good. The showing of these 
pictures, which are tied together under 
the general title American Industry on 
Parade, has opened the eyes of many 
advertisers to what can be done through 
television with film. 

Over 125 film firms are at present inter- 
ested in the television field, either actively 
or as an eventual market. They are 
divided into "we cost a lot" and "we 
make TV film at a price" groups. Sta- 
tions and agencies think there's a place 
for both. As yet the man who pays the 
bills, the sponsor, hasn't made up his 
mind— although he's becoming more and 
more aware that film is an integral part 
of television. 



In Advertising, it's the RESULT 
that counts! 

Local Advertisers bought over 2000 
"spots" on WKAX during December. 
These buyers are on the scene . . . 
in a position to see the result. 

WKAX is a heal station. Pro- 
grammed to please local tastes. 
That's why we can sell your mer- 
chandise to local people. 

COVER 

ALABAMA'S FIRST MARKET 
with 

WKAX 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

1000 Watts 900 KC. 

Ganus C. Scarborough 
Gen. Mgr. 



76 



SPONSOR 



PITY THE POOR SPONSOR: 




Yes. ..pity the poor Sponsor. ..who listens to the claims of competing 
stations,* Then, he gets swamped with Hoopers.' Then, he's bewildered! 
He's the fellow who pays the bills. And, to HIM... ^^^ in Cleveland, 
makes more than claims and promises. We make nnoney for sponsors 
thru results: The proof? For the past 6 years WHK has consist- 
antly done more program business with local sponsors (who can watch 
results the most closely). ..THAN ANY OTHER CLEVELAND STATION! 



WHK 

RETAILERS' CHOICE 
IN CLEVELAND 



FEBRUARY 1948 



77 



I' 




Control of TV set distribution informa 
tion will shortly be in the hands of the 
Broadcast Measurement Bureau. Radio 
Manufacturers Association estimates and 
those of other associations like the Tele- 
vision Broadcasters Association haven't 
satisfied advertising agency and sponsor 
executives. The announcement that 
BMB has accepted the tabulating and 
validating job has been greeted with 
huzzas by all industry factors. 

* * * While waiting for the official 
BMB statements the representatives of 
the District of Columbia stations(WNBW, 
WTTH, WMAL-TV) are issuing figures 
jointly. The first February figure was 
7,500 receivers privately owned. Sets are 
flowing into Washington homes at the 
rate of 1,000 a month. 



* * • NBC's Midwest TV network 
will get under way even before the 
scheduled September 1. Around that 
time NBC's owned and operated station 
in Chicago will be transmitting and serv- 
ing KSD-TV in St. Louis, WTMJ-TV 
in Milwaukee, and WWJ-TV in Detroit. 

* * * With Emerson Radio and Phon- 
ograph making available a 10-inch view- 
ing tube receiver the trend downward in 
price in TV receivers has started. Emer- 
son's viewer is retail-priced at $269.50 
and Dorman Israel, executive vp, says 
that their production schedule calls for 
500 receivers daily. Philco announced, 
during week of January 26, a set using 
a seven-inch tube, priced at $199.50. 

* * * Buyers unable to attend the 
big markets in their fields were given a 
preview of the future on January 12 when 
WBKB covered the Chicago Home fur- 
nishing Market with its cameras for two 
hours. While no attempt was made to 
have this a trade showing, since it went 
on the air for all who had receivers to 
see, the clarity of the exhibits made 



merchandise men state that holding 
annual market conclaves via TV is not 
just a stunt idea. 

* * * Just as in Boston, where a 
TV audience was built prior to WBZ- 
TV's actually taking the air, so are 
audiences being built in New Orleans and 
Atlanta and many other cities through- 
out the U. S. Although not yet on the 
air WDSU worked with RCA, American 
Broadcasting Company, and the Sugar 
Bowl Committee presented basketball, 
boxing, and the Alabama-Texas Sugar 
Bowl game for three days, December 29, 
December 30, and January I. The pro- 
grams were not on the air but were fed 
to the receivers in the Monteleone Hotel 
and were seen by around 500 a day. In 
Atlanta the demonstration was under the 
direction of WAGA which has a TV 
license for the city. Sets have been 
placed in department stores. Programs 
mix fashion shows and straight enter- 
tainment. Following the department 
store demonstrations a WAGA mobile 
unit will tour schools and neighboring 
towns. 




FM stations will shortly be operating 
under the same license conditions, 
with respect to length of license period, 
as AM stations do today. This does not 
mean that all stations on the air will have 
three-year licenses but those who have 
qualified for regular commercial licenses 
will be assured of tenure for that period. 
An official statement by the FCC to this 
effect may not come for a number of 
months but spurred by NAB's petition 



the modification of the rules required 
to make this possible is being written. 

* * * The Dixie FM network has 
become part of the Continental FM Net- 
work in presenting the music of the 
Rochester Symphon\' Orchestra on Fri- 
day evenings from 8:30 to 9 p.m. 

* * * Wherever arrangements can be 
made, live music is coming to FM sta- 
tions even if it can't go forth on any 
FM network (except the Rochester Sym- 
phony on the Continental chain). Latest 
group to be FMed is the 15-piece string 
section of the San Francisco Symphony 
over KRON at 3:30 to 4 p.m. on Sun- 
days. The local General Electric dis- 
tributor is underwriting the broadcast. 

* * * More than half the TV sets 
in production also include FM sound 
bands and are used to enjoy FM pro- 
grams as frequently as they are used to 



view visual programs. DuMont's 
special tuning device covers all the FM 
channels as do some of the bigger sets 
produced by other manufacturers. 

* * * While distributor salesmen and 
service staffs are being indoctrinated with 
FM by many of the big manufacturers 
(G. E. and Westinghouse are doing ex- 
traordinary jobs) the retail salesman in 
hundreds of areas is being left to shift for 
himself or worse being fed anti-FM 
propaganda. Only in areas where stations 
have accepted the dual assignment of 
selling the full-range staticless quality of 
FM as well as putting good programs on 
the air have the salesmen been indoc- 
trinated. If retail radio salesmen are pro- 
FM in any area, it's the best indication 
that any sponsor or agency executive 
could want that FM is a growing medium 
in that area. 




Philadelphia is turning out to be the 
nation's number one FAX city, with both 
WFIL and WCAU claiming to have 
been first in serving the Quaker City 



with newspap)ers via the air. The rivalry 
is natural, since the stations are owned 
by competing papers which have never 
given an inch, the Bulletin owning WCAU 
and the Inquirer owning WFIL. 

WFIL is air-printing two editions a day 
of the Inquirer, an eight-page at 2: 1 5 p.m. 
and a four-page at 5 p.m. 

* * * Many newspapers are appl>'ing 
for FM licenses as a hedge against the 
day when they will have to use FAX to 
hold their press leadership in their areas. 
FM is used to transmit facsimile copy. 



* * * Experiments indicate that a 
two-column newspapx'r is best for FAX, 
three and four columns having been 
tried also. No minimum space has been 
set for advertising as yet but department 
stores studying the medium have thus 
far decided that less than two inches in 
depth wouldn't be productive. 

* * * The only reason more publicity 
hasn't been given FAX is that the FCC 
is so tied down with TV, F.M, and AM 
license applications that FAX has just 
had to be given short shrift. 



78 



SPONSOR 




I 



IN V^ I VI V^ 11 1 WN^L-L^w! The common cold accounts for more millions 
of lost man-hours every year than any other ailment. And now for the first time in history, 
we have tangible reason to hope that this menace to all mankind may be banished. Recently 
two doctors from the staff of the United States Public Health Service Department definitely 
proved that colds are infectious. They have isolated the infectious agent which causes a 
cold, and have determined that what is needed is a vaccine. Mow apparently the doctors 
have the raw materials with which to make one. 

And just as science is striving constantly for a better tomorrow, so the Radio Industry has 
a vital interest in the future and is trying always to make tomorrow more enjoyable for the 
listener and more profitable for the advertiser. 

WSPD is proud to be a part of this rapidly expanding Industry! 



Just ask Katz 



A QUARTER CENTURY • THE VOICE OF TOLEDO 



WSPD TOLEDO, OHIO 



5000 WATTS 



FEBRUARY 194« 



79 



CHECKING SPOTS 

{Continued from page 29) 

product appeal seems to be the same as 
that of the product which paid for this 
test. 

Ronzoni Macaroni uses Italian lan- 
guage broadcasts to reach Italian New 
York and New Jersey. Since this is a 
very tight market Mogul makes monthly 
contest che ks to determine which of the 
stations broadcasting in Italian to use. 
In New York at present Mogul's check 
revealed WOV reaches four times the 
Ronzoni prospective consumers that the 
second station reaches. The contest most 



recently employed gave away an Italian I 
language magazine, a sure way of check- 
ing an Italian audience. , 
Station checking for clients costs ' 
Mogul about 10 cents per return, includ- 
ing costs of time, talent, prizes, mailing, 
and handling. This contrasts with costs 
of contests run on the networks that, 
taking into consideration the same 
factors that Mogul uses, cost from 50 : 
cents to $1.00 per inquiry. It must be 
stressed that the network contests have 
as an objective the increasing of the size 
of the program's listening audience as 
well as hypoing sales Mogul's generally 
onlv check audiences. 



wm\ mm 

ISI Tllli 

soiTii um 












a-^-^ 




WSI5T enjovs llio long and la.'^liii'r 
frien(lslii|) of its lisleiiers. For mow 
than 25 years people in the South 
Heiid area have heeii listening to 
this station. I he\ grew up with 
WSin' and dtptiid on it as a pleas- 
ant necessity in their lives. Because 
it has so many friends, \\ SBT makes 
sales. Local, national, and network 
advertisers know this for a fact. 




5000 WATTS 

960 KILOCYCLES 
COLUMBIA NETWORK 



PAUL 



80 



R A Y M E R 



C O 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



Mogul does get a sales lift for clients 
from each contest sufficient to justify 
contest costs. He also runs contests that 
have direct tie-ins with sales but these are 
seldom used to determine the listening 
impact of a station. These contests re- 
semble the Well-Dressed Man competi- 
tion, in which a panel of Broadway 
chorus girls judge listeners who come to a 
specific store on a specific day. It's a good 
stunt but not a station check. The same 
is true of Mogul's Cinderella plan. Wo- 
men listeners are told that in a specific 
National Shoe store at high noon a box 
will be opened containing a pair of shoes 
that even Cinderella would have loved to 
wear. The woman in the store at that 
time whose feet fit the shoes receives the 
shoes free. All the women in the store are 
checked on whether or not they heard the 
offer on the air so there is a station con- 
trol involved even in this offer. However 
because it involves consideration (being 
in the store) and because it can only 
reflect, at the best, the appeal of the 
station in the neighborhood in which the 
store is located, this formula isn't used 
to determine the complete listening 
audience to a station. 

Through localized offers such as this, 
Mogul has been able during the 18 years 
he has been in business to acquire a 
check on stations that enables him to 
pinpoint advertising for a specific neigh- 
borhood. Recently in Hackensack, 
N. J., National Shoes opened its 71st 
store. Mogul went to his "Broadcast 
Control" file, found that Station WNEW 
had a solid listening audience in Hack- 
ensack, and so this station was used to 
saturate this Jersey town. The store 
opening is said to have been the biggest 
since National Shoe went into business. 

The equivalent information developed 
by contests is not available from any 
research organization. If a research 
organization were hired to obtain these 
figures for Mogul the costs would be 
fantastically high. Mogul stresses that 
the contests are nothing outstanding; 
the follow-through, nothing that any 
medium size agency can't handle. How- 
ever to obtain this information on a 
national basis is something that no 
agency has ever attempted. Mogul 
doesn't even suggest that it be tried for 
all stations in the nation. However, it 
can be done to check the stations used 
on any single campaign. 

Spot campaigns don't have to be run 
blind -listener-test campaigns properly 
conceived will give the information re- 
quired and when it's required. 

Mogul has proved it in the metropoli- 
tan New York area. 

SPONSOR 



^3N^^ 



\~^ 




Always giving something extra! '^ 



*Just ask your 
Raymer representative 



LARGE 
AND LOW 



Clearlv. effective nelwork leadership must 
staml on two Ic^s. not one: 

1. LARGE AUDIENCES,* 

yes. but large audiences . . . 

2. AT LOW COST" 

J'or tli«' -oimd leasoiis noted in our 
l()(tlnott'> l>elo\v. lou^h-niinded advertisers 
never i<£nore tlie practical relationship 
between size ol audience (large !) and 
cost ol audience (low !). And by this 
rijiorous standard. CBS is the most effective 
network in Radio, today... 

For CBS — where 99 million people gather 
eiuTx m'i>k — delivers LAR(iE audiences 
(If ihr LOW KST cost of ANY netivork, 

'!( \ipii ilniri \n\ l..\K<iE aii(li<-nc»-> {when, today, almost everyone, 
everywhere, is a rusloiner) you miss one of the great advantages 
of major network broadcasting and your competitors may be 
reacliing (ii-lomer> you are missing. 

'I"hr <<i-i- of doing business today maive it more important 
than ever to get LARGE audiences at LOW cost per thousand 
actually delivered — or can you afford to let your competitors 
buy customers at less cost than you do? 



,;^5- 



>\; . 



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THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


c 


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— '^"''"'"''". 




-l^i 




FOR LAST 
THREE YEARS:- 

HOOPE RATING* 

(Morniag, Afternoon/ And Evening COMBINED) 
Station B-33.6 Station C-16.2 Station D-10.2 

(DAYTIME ONLY- 1 947) 

WHEC 44.4 

'FAU-WINTER— I944-'4S, 1945-'4«..l946-'47 WINTER-SPRING— 1V44.'4S, 194$-'46. 1946-47 



PROOF OF THE PULLING!* 



PROGRAM 


NATIONAL 
HOOPER 


WHEC 


American Melody Hour 


9.9 


16.4 


ftoby Snoolct 


13.4 


27.0 


Big Sisier 


6.3 


14.5 


Big Town 


U.2 


29.4 


Blendie 


li.i 


20.7 


Bob Hawk 


9.7 


32.3 


Crime Doctor 


9.6 


19.6 


Dr. Christian 


12.2 


22.8 


Durante & Moore 


12.4 


18.1 


Ellery Queen 


8.1 


19.8 


Family Hour 


6.5 


11.4 


Fronk Sinatra 


9.9 


18.2 


Ginny Simmt 


8.8 


18.5 


Grand Slam 


4.4 


12.9 


Hour of Charm 


6.2 


10.1 



PROGRAM 


NATIONAL 
HOOPER 


WHEC 


House Parly 


4.1 


14.1 


Inner Sanctum 


12.9 


26.9 


Jack Carton 


10.1 


16.9 


Joan Davit 


13.7 


26.5 


Lux Theofer 


23.8 


38.1 


Moyor of the Town 


9.1 


18.4 


Meredith Willton 


6.5 


17.5 


Mr. Keen 


10.8 


22.4 


Our Gol Sunday 


6.8 


13.1 


Oiiie & Harriet 


11.5 


25.0 


Romance of Helen Trent 


6.9 


11.5 


The Thin Man 


10.8 


22.6 


Vaughn Monroe 


8.6 


16.4 


Vox Pop 


8.7 


19.9 


Your Hit Parade 


12.3 


24.2 




GOOD Afternoon! 




*Frem Fall-Winter Hooper Survey, 1946-1947 




FEBRUARY 1948 



87 








'n November 1H. the Bell System demon- 
strated its new experimental radio relay system 
between New York and Boston, bringing television 
within reach of vast new audiences. 

Tlie tower you see here is part of it. It's one of 
seven similar structures which relay microwaves 
between the two cities, carrying television programs 
with high fidelity. This new system will, of course, 
be used for tlie tianstnissiou of Long Distance tele- 
phone calls and radio programs. 

Used in conjunction w ith the Bell System's coaxial 
cabh'. the new radio relay system now makes it 



possible to bring television to a potential audience 
of some 25.000.000 people along the eastern sea- 
board. And already work is under way on additional 
Bell System radio relay projects which will link 
New York and Philadelphia and extend west all 
the way to Chicago. 

The Bell System may be relied upon to provide 
the most efficient, dependable facilities for the trans- 
mission of connnunications. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




ts 



SPONSOR 



WIBK 

Knoxville, Tennesee 




in 

BLACK 
& 

AY/IUIflTp 



KNOXVILLE'S BEST BET 

Represented by Donald Cooke, Inc. 



The Best Buy in the Rich 
Central Missouri Valley 



hometown stations 






KBON 
KOLN 
KORN 




BASIC 
J MUTUAL 



Sjundets-Kcnncdy Bldg., Omaha, Nebraska 
W»«el a Company — Nail. R«D'. 




DAYTIME TV 

{Continued Jrom page 43) 

a great deal to say in the purchase of a 
product in the multiple-hundred'dollar 
price range, and feminine fashions can 
lose male viewers. The program has been 
found to attract women through the 
fashions and to hold the men through the 
models and entertainment. Mc Ray 
Michaels always keeps the male audience 
in mind and makes them feel at home. 

The Friday sports program is usually 
the outstanding high school game of the 
week but when there has been an impor- 
tant race at Pimlico or Bowie the pro- 
gram's cameras have gone to the races. 

Saturday's hour is turned over to 
The Local Crowd, a teen-age shindig with 
Bill "Dean" Herson running the party. 
Herson is well-known in Washington. 
With a juke box and free Pepsi-Cola the 
high school crowd has a wonderful time, 
dancing, singing, talking about sports, 
being natural. Auditions for the show 
are held on Friday and so many turn up 
that a ration system had to be devised so 
that all the high schools in the district 
might have an opportunity for their 
students on the program. 

Youth has been found a vital factor 
in making that final sale of a television set 
and that's why two out of the four pro- 
grams have a juvenile slant. 

The series started on October 28 as an 
eight-week contract and was renewed this 
month for 52 weeks. Where a maximum 
of four or five prospects per day per 
dealer looked at receivers in the daytime 
prior to these programs, now 15 to 20 
are to be found in dealers' shops during 
showtime. Where the sets are visible 
from the street or placed in show win- 
dows there are often as many as 20 passers- 
by who stop to watch the program. A 
number of these "window shoppers" have 
turned into set buyers, although the 
j ratio of those actually buying sets favors 
those who come into the store 10 to 1. 

The commercials naturally use pictures 
of RCA- Victor television receivers. Pla- 
cards, slides, and live commercials are 
used — as many of the last as possible. 
At the conclusion of each bit of set- 
selling the announcer says — "For this 
and other outstanding RCA- Victor tele- 
vision receivers visit the RCA-Victor 
dealer nearest you. In the Northwest 
it's . ", etc. Five dealers' names are 

used following each commercial. 

Although it's an RCA-Victor dis- 
tributor commercial, the program also 
is selling for Philco, DuMont, General 
Electric, and some of the independents 
which is okav'with the dealers too. 





FIRST 



in the 



y? 



QUAD 



The 40th retail market 
DAVENPORT 
ROCK ISLAND 
M L I N E 
EAST MO LINE 



,/,-/ 



"WOC call letters assigned 
February 18, 1922— FIRST 
in the Quad Cities." 




5,000 Walts, 1420 Kc. 
BASIC NBC Affiriate 
t. J. Palmer, Pres. 

Buryl Lottridge, Mgr. 

DAVENPORT, IOWA 

National Representatives: 
FREE & PETERS, Inc. 



FEBRUARV 1948 



89 



COVERING 


KEY METROPOLITAN 


MARKET AREAS 


WKAP 


Allentown 


KVET 


Austin 


WSID 


Baltimore 


WORL 


Boston 


WFAK 


Charleston, S. C. 


WTIP 


Charleston. W.Va. 


WGTL 


Charlotte 


WSBC 


Chicago 


KSIX 


Corpus Christi 


WJBK 


Detroit 


WBBC 


Fhnt 


KNUZ 


Houston 


WOBS 


Jacksonville 


WLAN 


Lancaster 


KWKW 


Los Angeles 


WCCM 


Lowell - Lawrence 


WNEX 


Macon 


WHHM 


Memphis 


WME 


Miami 


WMLO 


Milwaukee 


WMIN 


Minn.. St. Paul 


WBNX 


New York 


WLOW 


Norfolk 


WOAS 


Philadelphia 


WWSW 


Pittsburgh 


WRIB 


Providence 


KXLW 


St. Louis 


KONO 


San Antonio 


KUSN 


San Diego 


KEEN 


San Jose 


KFMJ 


Tulsa 


CKNW 


Vancouver, B. C. 


WWDC 


Wash., D. C. 


WHWL 


Wilkes-Barre 


WTUX 


Wilmington 


Forjoe 


& Company 


National Representatives 


New York • 


Chicago • Philadelphia 


Pittsburgh • 


Washington • Baltimore 


Los Angeles • San Francisco 



PRESS AGENTS 

(Continued from page 26) 

tion properties. 

Many advertisers have wondered 
whether or not multiple press agents on a 
radio program get into each other's hair 
and cancel each other's efforts. Actually 
that seldom happens. The efforts of all 
the promotional people involved in one 
presentation must of course be coordin- 
ated. All promotional men feel that pre- 
debut conferences in which all publicity 
men are represented should be a must. 
These meetings with the networks, clients, 
agencies are routine, though talent pub- 
licity men are seldom included. Integra- 
tion meetings are necessary because when 
publicity releases duplicate each other, 
they nullify each other, and nothing is 
published. At one time (a few years ago) 
radio editors were receiving publicity re- 
leases which said virtually the same thing 
from stations, networks, advertising agen- 
cies, corporate press departments, inde- 
pendent press agents on the account, and 
talent p.a.'s. Having bull sessions on 
programs before they hit the air has 
corrected this situation to a large extent. 

Networks cooperate freely with inde- 
pendent publicity men. There was a time 
when NBC felt them to be undesirable, 
but under the regime of Sydney Eiges, 
now NBC press vp, they are accepted as 
contributing substantially to the public's 
knowledge of broadcast talent. It's true 
that a few of the smaller p.a.'s impose on 
the networks' photographic and mailing 
departments but this is simply because 
these agents haven't a big enough budget 
and still feel they must do a job. 

Press parties are standard adjuncts of 
press-agentry. Networks usually share 
half the cost of these parties. They range 
from trade press meetings with talent 
(lunches for 20-25 editors, and agency, 
sponsor, and network executives) to 
Waldorf-Astoria-ballroom-size cocktail 
parties. Steve Hannagan took editors on 
a boatride around Manhattan as a pub- 
licity door-<)pener for Dick Haymes — one 
way of keeping the editors with the guest 
of honor for an extended period. Un- 
fortunately most of these press parties 
have little excuse for being except as 
window-dressing for the man who pays 
the bills^the advertiser. 

That independent press agents can also 
do a top-notch job for transcribed pro- 
grams isn't as generally accepted as it is 
for network operations. However, Ban- 
ner and Greif (Jack Banner, ex-WNEW 
and Motion Picture Daily; Eddie Greif, 
ex-NBC and the Daily) made the tran- 
scribed series Longines' World's Most 



IT'S THE 



STATION GREAT 



MON 

HAS MORE 
LISTENERS 

IN NORTHEASTERN LOUISIANA 
' ALL OTHER STATIONS 
^ COMBINED! 

■>. AFFILIATED WITH 

AMERICAN BROADCASTING CO. 
REPRESENTED BY 

TAYLOR-HOWE-SNOWOEN 

^ /^aJ/a Sales ^ 



SPONSOR 



THE JOE HERNANDEZ SHOW 

a 3.1 Hooper 

in 
OCTOBER ! 



Nightly . . . 3,000,000 listeners in 
Southern California, via KMPCI 

1,500,000 listeners in the San 
Francisco bay region, via KYA! 

Mr. Sponsor, or Mr. Account 
Executive, this is the show that 
delivers, six nights each week, 
throughout the year! 

The Joe Hernandez Radio Show, 
featuring Thoroughbred Racing, 
is available for the San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, San Diego, 
Portland and Seattle Markets!! 



The Bloodstock Agency of California 

954 So. La Brea Street 
Los Angeles 36, Calif. 

YORK 0373 



^ use \ 



THAN ANY OTHER 
RADIO STATION 



OMAHA & 
Council Bluffs 



BASIC ABC 5000 WATTS 

Represented By 
EDWARD PETRY CO., INC. 



Hotwred Flights with Eddie Rickenbacker 
and Hans Christian Adamson. Each pro- 
gram (there were 13 originally but they 
were extended to 18) was treated as 
though it were a live show, securing a con- 
siderable amount of newspaper space as a 
result. The show was spotted frequently 
in newspapers' "Best Bets" listings and 
radio news columns mentioned it often 
during its run. 

As an opening gesture, Longines had a 
lunch for Rickenbacker at the Waldorf- 
Astoria. At this lunch Rickenbacker sug- 
gested that an atomic bomb be used to 
blast ice away at the Poles to uncover 
mineral and other deposits. The wire 
services all carried the tale — with full 
credit to Longines. The national news 
magazines also ran full columns on the 
Rickenbacker suggestion with adequate 
mention of both the program and the 
sponsor. 

The big problem for Banner and Greif 
in the handling of the publicity for their 
transcribed series was the fact that, being 
transcribed, it was on the air in each town 
at a different time of the day and day of 
the week. They did point out that while 
e.t.'s today don't represent the mental 
hurdle they once did, Crosby, Lombardo, 
Tommy Dorsey, Bob Bums, Ronald CoJ- 
man, and many other stars having helped 
to erase this bugaboo, there was still a 
feeling against "canned" entertainment in 
the field when they publicized the 
Longines program. 

In no division of broadcasting is the 
independent press agent more needed 
than in handling the traveling program, 
such as Professor I. Q., which Banner and 
Greif handle for Amoco, and Vox Pop, 
which Coll and Freedman handle for the 
package owner. Parks Johnson. While 
the stars themselves (and their wives) do 
a great deal of the promotional work it's 
essential that a publicity man be on the 
job to make certain that the newspapers 
know what the stars are doing. In one 
town the latter may make as many as 25 
personal appearances. Each helps to 
build an audience but news of each ap- 
pearance in the press helps still more. 
More and more programs are traveling 
(see P.S., page 16). This means more and 
more need for the independent press 
agent. 

There is a school of thought that insists 
that the sponsor is better off hiring a pub- 
licity man of his own to spread the news 
of broadcast advertising, that he requires 
a publicity director and perhaps a pub- 
licity staff, such as General Motors has. A 
radio publicity staff will cost any corpora- 
tion several times what an independent 



^kefi^'4. onlif^ onm . . 



DOWNSTATE 
ILLINOIS 



^Ue^'4, onlf 



(km 004ce 



WMIX 



and 



WMIX 



"Southern Illinois' Most Powerful 
Radio Voice" 

that covers and sells that entire 
rich market for you with both 
AM and FM at one single low rate. 

No. 2 Radio Centtr, Mt. Vernon, III. 



940 kc 



94.1 mc 



National Representative 
John E. Pearson Company 



FEBRUARY 1948 



91 



WM iD 



PEQRIAREA 



A bigper share of the audience than 
all other Peoriarea statiotis combined! 
Proof of WMHD's confiiuiinK leader- 
ship is found in the latest (Oct.-Nov., 
1947) Hooper Station Listeninj^ Index. 

A. H. ('. r> I'l •irini.n Stiltinns. 

MORNINGS 




AFTERNOONS 




' Adjusted to compensate for 
fact that these stations do 
not hioadcast in eveninK. 

EVENINGS 




Dollar for dollar, WMBD is 
'A\ your best buy in Peoriarea! 




PEORIA 

CBS AffiliaU • 5000 Watts | 
Fr«« A P«l«ri, Inc., Nat'l. Repi 



98 



operator costs him. While the independ- 
ent press agent can send out releases on 
several clients in the same envelope, a 
press agent working for a sponsor has to 
send out his releases in the company 
envelopes and the cost is all chargeable to 
the programs. Entertainment costs can 
be split, but sharing deals are almost im- 
possible to work out for a corporation p. a. 
The fact is that a press agent working for 
a company (and handling radio for it) is 
expensive and in nearly every case where 
this has been tried it has been dropped. 
As indicated before, even big advertising 
agencies with big departments handling 
publicity find it insurance to engage out- 
side radio press agents. Du Pont has a 
big public relations department, its adver- 
tising agency (BBD&O) has one of the 
biggest publicity departments in the 
agency field, and still Cavalcade of 
America, the du Pont air show, has Coll & 
Freedman doing publicity for it. 

At one time, one of the three great food 
corporations decided to set up its own 
radio publicity department. The experi- 
ment continued for two years and while 
it's almost impossible to make a fair com- 
parison between what outside public rela- 
tions service vs. company operation ac- 
complished per dollar, a report made to 
the chairman of the board of the company 
revealed the following figures: 

Food Corporation Radio Publicity Costs 

COMPANY' OPERATION 

First Year 
Newspaper 
Cost Lineage 

$13.'>,000 342.000 lines 



THE KEY TO 



Program 
Ratings 

+0.5* 



.Second Year 
Sl.SS.OOO 280.000 lines 



-1.0* 



INDEPENDENT P. A. 
First Year 
Cost Lineage Ratings 

$85,000 438,000 lines +1.3* 

Second Year 

$105,000 488.000 lines + .9* 

*l!p or down from the prerioiis year's atierage ratings. 

The savings were sizable and the re' 
suits better when outside press agents 
were working for the company. 

One factor not revealed in these 
figures is the need for someone in 
the company to ride herd personally on 
the outside counsel. By and large pub- 
licity men must be kept on their toes. 
When they work for talent they are not 
only kept on their toes but it's possible to 
see daylight between them and the ground 
most of the time. Turnover in talent ac- 
counts is terrific. David Alber keeps his 



QntActJt "J /li/umcta 




MINNESOTA'S IMPll lAARKll 

• 350,000 INTEKNATIO.NAL visitors 

• 34,000 METROPOLITAN residents 

• 8^,200 RURAL consumers in the priraar>' 
coverage area. 

EVERYONE IfDAf Minn. Network 

DIALS TO Imlm^rV N. W. Network 

Southern Minnesota's Oldest Radio Station 

Vilahlhhed l'Ji5 

IN ROCHESTER, MINNESOTA 

Nationally represented by the John E. Pearson Co. 




PIONEERING SINCE 

1942 

• 

dn eMaBUdAed claim' 

on the 
JCattAa^ City. MatAet 

• 

for svaihbilHies write 

O. R. Wrisht, Sales Manascr 

Porter BIdg., Kansas City, Mo. 

• 

E. L. DILLARD, GENERAL MANAGER 



« 



SPONSOR 



1 




5,433,574 Pairs of Ears 
within reach of Philadei- 



Ph 



la s 



Pion 



eer 



Vo 



ice. 



WIP 

BASIC MUTUAL 

610 ON DIAL 



Represented nafionally 
by EDWARD PETRY & CO. 




Atlantic City's Hotel of Distinction 

The Ideal Hotel for Rest and 
Relaxation. Beautiful Rooms. 
Salt Water Baths. Glass in- 
closed Sun Porches. Open 
Sun Decks atop. Delightful 
Cuisine. Garage on premises. 
Open All Year. 

Fiesta Grill and Cocktail Lounge 
Favorite Rendezvous of the Elite 

Exclusive Pennsylvania Avenue 
and Boardwalk 



stars relatively happy but a list of his ex- 
accounts is revealing: 

(only talent is listed) 
Kenny Baker 
Joan Davis 
Ed Gardner 
Morton Gould 
Dick Ilaymes 
Bob Hawk 
Woody Herman 
Jackie Kelk 
Dinali Sliore* 
Rudy Vallee 
Mark Warnowj 
Alan Young 

*Atber couldnt hold both Kaifi Smith and Dinah 
Shore. It was either Smith or Shore. 
iAlber represented Warnow for 19 years. 



Even open-end transcription producers 
realize the need of the independent press 
agent. Men like Frederic Ziv have em- 
ployed such counsel for years. Ziv is cur- 
rently being handled by Ferris, with Len 
Traube, formerly of The Billboard, as ac- 
count executive. The open-end publicity, 
with different sponsors in every city or 
area, is a publicity man's nightmare but 
programs like Ronald Colman's Favorite 
Story, with each week's broadcast being 
selected by another big name, is a pub- 
licity natural. 

Local stations throughout the country 
have programs that call upon the talents 
of young press agents, most of them being 
either second string men in the station's 
publicity departments or newspaper men 
who turn an extra penny doing publicity 
on the side. Many local advertising 
agencies also take on publicity chores for 
programs which they don't represent 
(where they're produced by the sponsor 
himself or by the station for the sponsor 
direct) . 

It is of course impossible to gauge just 
how much independent press agents gen- 
erally have to do with what is published, 
but a check-up during January revealed 
that in one issue of Life over 50 per cent 
of the stories were inspired by publicity 
men and in an issue of Look during the 
same month over 40 per cent indicated the 
spark of press^agentry. 

Newspaper and magazine editors are 
cynics of the first water. Most of them 
are under orders not to be too receptive to 
any form of handout and to treat a radio 
story with twice as much skepticism 
as any other "idea" material. All press 
agents have a few contacts that will come 
through for them in a pinch but it takes 
something extra to deliver publicity on a 
circulation basis. That's what most inde- 
pendent agents have to do and very few 
have clients who deliver a "Miss Hush" 
to publicize. 



WHAT STATION IN 
SOUTHEASTERN OHIO 
DELIVERS 60 PERCENT 
OF THE LISTENING 
AUDIENCE? 

IT'S 




ZANESVILLE 



60 PERCENT 

. . . of all listening homes in 
Zanesville are tuned to WHIZ, 
according to Conlan Survey (week 
of November 16, 1947). 



60.4 



Average for 
entire survey 



17.2 



19.0 



7.6 



WHIZ ABC Others 

MORNING, NOON 
AND NIGHT 

. . . WHIZ dominates in 
Southeastern Ohio. 

• 55.5% of morning audience 

• 59.7% of afternoon audience 

• 63.2% of evening audience 

IT'S A 




FOR SALES 
NBC IN ZANESVILLE 

REPRESENTED BY JOHN E. PEARSON 



FEBRUARY 1948 



93 



SM»Oi\S00gl 




SPEAKS 



What Do You Call It ? 

The word spot is one of the most con- 
fusing in broadcast advertising. Yet the 
industry goes right on using it. 

To some spot means station breaics, 
participating announcements, and any- 
thing else that doesn't fit conveniently 
into the program category. Others think 
of spot as the whole wide field of non- 
network radio advertising. But most 
people think of spot as both, and con- 
sequently don't know what to think. 

Now something's being done which, we 
hope, will eliminate this source of con- 



fusion. With our December issue we 
began an editorial campaign to uncover 
a name or two to take the place of spot. 
We're open to suggestions, the more the 
merrier. A number of candidates for 
the over-all (non-network) term have 
already come in. H. R. Laudermilk, 
The McCormick- Armstrong Co., Wichita, 
votes for "area advertising" or "pin- 
point advertising." C. Wylie Calder, 
WHAN, Charleston, S. C, likes "mar- 
ket advertising." Paul Raymer, who 
feels that his station rep job would profit 
by elimination of that four-letter word, 
comes out for either "national selective 
radio," or just "selective." And Wells 
Bamett, Jr., of John Blair & Co., reminds 
us that if we're going to agitate for 
tossing the term spot into the ashcan 
we ought to watch its use in our own 
pages. We mean to do that from here 
on in. 

So how about a new word for s-p-o-t? 
Maybe you have a winner on the tip of 
your tongue. What do you call it? 

The Better Way 

Public service programing is becoming 
more important now that it is using com- 
mercial broadcasting techniques. No 
longer are broadcasts of banquets, presen- 
tations of awards, and speeches generally 
foisted upon unsuspecting dialers. Today 
charitable and "cause" organizations 
build top-ranking documentary programs, 
fine entertainment shows, and use singing 
announcements to raise money and sell 



ideas. When labor (AFL and CIO) wants 
to plead its case it goes to the public with 
regular daytime and evening entertain- 
ment programs. Tolerance is sold to 
America over 600 stations with jingles 
that make racial and religious equality 
understandable. These documentary 
jingles are transcribed as a public service 
by Station WNEW (New York) and made 
available to all stations without charge or 
request for air-credit. In one week 
jingles from the current series were used 
on the air 6,000 times. They are the first 
jingles to be released to the public in 
record album form (two disk companies 
have albums) and in songbook form. 

When WSM, Nashville, decided to de- 
vote an entire hour to a great musical 
documentary in honor of the arrival of the 
Freedom Train in town, they expanded 
many of the tolerance jingles into full- 
length folk songs. Years ago the event 
would have been signalized by speeches 
from the station, a lot of grandiose verbi- 
age. WSM's handling of the event in a 
thrilling hour-long musical with the Fisk 
University Choir of a hundred voices, a 
full orchestra, and special continuity, 
highlights the new approach to public 
service programing. The fact that WSM 
cancelled an hour of evening commercial 
broadcasts is another indication of how 
stations feel about bringing vital matters 
like freedom to their listeners. 

It's a tribute to commercial broadcast- 
ing that it has set the pace for public 
service programing. 




Applause 




NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS! 



Show business has always responded when called upon to 
play a "benefit" performance. A "hoofer" may be dog tired, 
he may have worked four or five shows at a night club or at 
one of the few remaining vaudeville houses in the U. S., yet 
when the call comes to do his bit for a worthy cause he's the 
first in line to volunteer his services. 

Broadcasting is show business. When the cause is worthy 
and the need great, radio doesn't stint its time or its talent. 
When Jack Benny visited Denver for a March of Dimes per- 
formance (January 18-23), he and his troupe could have had 
just as much publicity and acclaim from one broadcast as 
from the week-long parade of personal appearances con- 
tributed to the campaign to check infantile paralysis. During 
war bond drives, Kate Smith could have obtained all the 
newspaper pictures and linage she actually did receive from 
her pleas to "buy bonds" on her programs and her singing of 
God Bless America, without deciding to stay up at CBS head- 
quarters for 24 hours to permit listeners to subscribe for bonds 
directly through her at any hour of the day or night. The 
24-hour vigil was dramatic — it was show business and it 
broke ail records for bond subscriptions. 



F. D. R. has passed away. The glamor with which he in- 
vested the March of Dimes no longer drives radio. Yet in 
1948 more hours of air time were given and more personal 
appearances were made by stars, more programs were 
traveled to distant points, than ever before. FM station 
WFMZ, AUentown, Pa., to dramatize what it was going to do, 
requested permission of the FCC to be 100 per cent commer- 
cial for an entire week. The public was asked to turn sponsor 
and buy anywhere from a time check announcement at $.50 
to an hour program at $25.00 to tell the March of Dimes story. 

The examples mentioned are but a tiny number of the 
thousands of times a week that broadcasting forgets business 
and thinks only of its show business tradition, of never turning 
down a worthy benefit. It's not something upon which a re- 
search organization could put its finger. Broadcasting gives, 
and the more it gives the less it hurts. Show business has a 
way of forgetting itself in a cause. 

The sponsor comes in for his share of the credit in many of 
these cases. Time and talent are often donated through his 
generosity. But then, sponsors are in show business too. 



94 



SPONSOR 



Yes 



m count me in as 
w a subscriber to 



ir $5 D 
irs$9 D 

irs $1 2 D 

1 50c a year 
anadian and 
jn postage) 




Name 

Company 

Home n 
Address Office □ 

City Postal Zone State. 



Your Position 

No Money Now — Just Mail This Post-Free Card! M 



PUBLICATIONS INC. 



40 WEST 52 STREET. NEW YORK 19 



PLAZA 3-&2U 



FIRST CLASS 

PERMIT NO. 47613 

(Sec. 510. P. L. & R.) 

NEW YORK. N. Y. 



BUSINESS REPLY CARD 

No Postage Stamp Necessary ii Mailed in the United States 



2c. -POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS Inc. 
40 WEST 52 STREET 
New York 19, New York 



WLW 



^c<Aena^ 







\n four weeks 
WLW reaches 81.2% 
of the 3Va million radio 
homes wifhin this area . . 

With 175 $f of ions heard 



3% 
listening to all stations 



Look at the figures in that headHne again. 

They reveal the tremendous impact of The Nation's 
Station within the WLW Merchandise-Able Area, as 
shown by the Nielsen Radio Index for February-March, 
1947. 

During the four measured weeks of listening, WLW 
reached more than four-fifths— 8L2%— of the 3/4 million 
radio homes within the area, between 6 AM and mid- 
night. That's coverage! 

During the same four weeks, a total of 175 stations 
received listening within the area, yet WLW received 
one-fifth— 19.3%— of all Hstening to all stations. That's 
dominance! 

How much did these homes listen? Taking all 3/4 
million radio homes within the area, WLW received an 
average of 375 minutes of listening per home per week 
between 6 AM and midnight. But, among that 81.2% of 



the homes which were classified as WLW listen- 
ers, the average was 550 minutes of listening to 
WLW per home per week between 6 AM and 
midnight. That's penetration! 

These are just a few of the vital facts revealed 
by this NRI study. For complete details— and for 
the figures on the 15 leading competitive stations 
—contact the WLW Sales Office in Cincinnati, 
New York or Chicago. On the West Coast, the 
Keenan & Eickelberg offices in Los Angeles, San 
Francisco, and Portland will be glad to serve you. 




k 



THE NATION'S MOST MERCHANDISE-ABLE STATl 

CROSIEY MOAOCASTING CORPORA 

masm 



ISA 



jssjismi 




m WAY TO A WOMAN'S HEART. . , 




Wally Kay . . . who conducts WJWs two top 
juvenile programs . . . has found that the way 
to a woman's heart is through her children. 
As scores of listening mothers say . . . Kay's 
programs "entertain but do not unnerve" 
their youngsters. 

Cousin Kay's Corner . . . across the board at 
4:45-5:00 P.M. . . . gives Cleveland children 
the personal recognition program that 
juvenile dialers desire. Because Cousin Kay's 
Corner keeps children busy and happy . . . 
parent response is pronounced! 

Storybook Merry-Go-Round ... at 4:00-4:30 
P. M. on Sunday . . . has become a svmbol of 
delightful entertainment for small frv . . . 
endorsed by P TA leaders and recommended 
for selecnive dialing by The Radio Council of 
Greater Cleveland. 

Alone ... or in an all-week combination 
. . . Wally Kay's WjW shows offer an 
advertiser a new wav to a woman's heart . . . 
provide a tested formula ... an established 
audience. The mail pull is terrific . . . more 
than 3,''0() letters in a single recent week. 




Cousi 
chain 



n Kay's Corne 
of cnlhusiasdc 



r at W 
letters 



J\V sets off 
from young 



ain reaction ... a 
and their parents. 



.\udience reaction is reflected b> the absorbed attention 
with which children enjoy Storybook Merr> -Go-Round. 



BILL O'NEIL, President 




BASK 

ABC Network 



CLEVELAND 



850 KC 

5000 Watts 



REPRESENTED 



NATIONALLY 



B Y 



HEADLEY-REED 



COMPANY 



MARCH 1948 • $5.00 a Year 



Dialing habits are changing— p. 23 

Candy on the air— p. 36 

Escape through radio— p. 26 





Each Fort Industry station draws on a reservoir of know-liow that's 
kept well-filled with tested ideas and promotions originating with 
the other six alert, aggressive Fort Industry stations. Result? Listener 



interest that makes cash registers hum. 




THE FORT INDUSTRY COJIPAH 

WSPD, Toledo, O. • WWVA, Wheeling, W. Va. • WMMN, Fairmoni. V( . Va. 

WLOK, Lima, O. • WAGA, Atlanta, Ga. • WGBS. >Ii;imi. Fla. • Vk JBK, D.lroii. Midi. 

IS'ational Sales Offices: 527 Lexington Ave., A'eic York 17, EUlorudo 5-2455 




...SPONSOR REPORTS.. 



..SPONSOR REPOR 



March 1948 



MOTION-PICTURE 
ANTI-TV FRONT 
IS CRACKING 



55 BBD&O 
CLIENTS USE SPOT 



Twentieth Century-Fox's sale of daily newsreel to Camels is only 
beginning of break by that film company with motion picture industry 
on TV. They have applied for station in Boston and expect to file 
for several other towns as well. Their television blueprint in- 
cludes equipment for theater-size TV in cities where consumer video 
operations are under way. Paramount, first motion picture company 
with TV interests, may sell KTLA (L. A.) and its stock in DuMont. 
It will not accept offers made for WBKB (Chicago) . Barney Balaban, 
head of Balaban & Katz, Paramount subsidiary owning WBKB, feels it's 
too valuable to let go, whatever motion pictures exhibitors think 
about it. 

-SR- 



Of BBD&O 's 102 clients 55 are using spot announcements. 
55 range from $10,000 to over $1,000,000. 

-SR- 



Budgets for 



BLOCK-PROGRAMED 
JOCKEYS BRING 
WMCA $600,000 



E.Q. OF NEW 
STARS RISING 



CAMPBELL TO 
MAKE MBS TEST? 



Block-programed name disk jockeys have upped New York WMCA's daytime 
sales 30% over station's similar period last year. Billings of Bea 
Wain and Andre Baruch (Mr. and Mrs. Music), Tommy Dorsey, Ted 
Steele, and Duke Ellington, all WMCA disk jockeys, are said to 
exceed $600,000 annually. 

-SR- 

While Bing Crosby's Enthusiasm Quotient, as checked by Gallup, is 
highest of all performers, new stars are looming strong. On way up 
are Spike Jones, My Friend Irma (program rather than performers in 
this case), Christopher Lynch, Danny Thomas, Abe Burrows, Jim 



Backus, Dorothy Shay 



E.Q. is based on listener-enthusiasm tests 
-SR- 



Carapbell Soup, whose broadcast advertising is concentrated now on 
CBS, may take a test flight on Mutual. MBS is giving its all to 
satisfy Campbell they have something no other net can give Camden 
soup manufacturer. 



SPONSOR'S new Chicago address 

SPONSOR'S Chicago office, managed by Kay Brown, moved to expanded quar- 
ters at 75 East Wacker Drive, Zone 1, on February 2. The new telephone 
number is Financial 1556. In addition to serving as Midwest advertising 
headquarters, the Chicago office maintains a readers' service section 
where back copies and other subscriber aids are available. 



SPONSOR, Vol. 2, j\o. 5, March I9'i8. Published monlhlv bv Sponsor Publicalions Inc. Publication of/ices: 5800 Y. Mervine St.. Philadilohia it. Pa. Adcertising. Editor- 
ial, and Circulation offices, iO W. 52 St., \ew York 19, N. Y. Acceptance under the act of June 5. I'JSi at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, authorized December 2. /9^7. 



MARCH 1948 



?;...SPONSOR RE PORTS... SPONSOR R 



NBC PACKAGE- 
PROGRAM 
EXPANSION 



AD-FIGHT ON 
FTC "FREE" 
RULING 



CBS TO INVEST 
$1,000,000 
IN TV 



NATIONAL SPOT 
ADS OFF IN 
JANUARY 



12-MONTH 
CONTRACT 
PROTECTION? 



WHITE ROCK 
GETS STARTED 



MUSIC SELLING 
TEST 



NBC purchase of "Aunt Mary" and "Dr. Paul" serial programs is start 
of build-up in program production and ownership facilities. Number 
of other show properties are being considered for purchase. 

-SR- 

FTC ruling that word "free" can be used only for premium given with- 
out required purchase of anything (not even label or boxtop) , has 
started one of advertising industry's greatest battles with govern- 
ment. Ruling will be taken to high courts if Commission doesn't 
reverse stand. 

-SR- 

CBS will invest over $1,000,000 in TV facilities, with building of 
new studios and return to studio production. CBS developed many 
present-day production formulas; is expected to give NBC and DuMont 
fight for audience attention. Net has 3'^^ interest in Madison 
Square Garden Corporation, is expected to strengthen its stock posi- 
tion substantially although officially "not interested" in becoming 
large-scale stockholder. 

-SR- 

While local broadcasting business was up in January, national spot 
placement continued down (see page 64). Radio's "market by market" 
form of advertising is sensitive to business conditions which con- 
tinued shaky at all levels but retail. 

-SR- 

Business conditions are too unsettled, according to most network and 
national spot advertising authorities, for advertisers to be given 
12 months protection on rates, in most cases, as requested by AAAA. 
AAAA request for extension of 2% cash discount is meeting more ac- 
ceptance. When conditions are unsteady any incentive for cash pay- 
ment will cut credit losses. 

-SR- 

White Rock air advertising in local markets (indicated in SPONSOR'S 
"Soft Drink Leadership") started in February. Concentration at 
present is in Miami (WIOD, WQAM, WGBS, WKAT, WWPB) and Palm Beach 
(WEAT, WJNO, WIRK) . Chain breaks, time signals, and jingles are 
being used. Green River is also getting under way reviving interest 
in this nostalgic drink. 

-SR- 

Seven independent stations decided in January to prove that radio is 
music's best selling medium. They took a song, "There I Go," out of 
dead storage, repressed a Vaughn Monroe disk, and each plugged it 5 
to 10 times daily. Sales have passed 125,000 with Victor Recording 
looking to 250,000 goal. Sheet music has been reissued and every- 
one's happy including song writers Hy Zaret and Irving Weiser. Idea 
was inspired by Ted Cott of WNEW. Test stations were WHDH, Boston; 
WJJD, Chicago; WNEW, New York; WPEN, Philadelphia; WSCR, Scranton; 
WWDC, Washington; WWSW, Pittsburgh. 

SPONSOR 



t 



The Oklahoma City Consumer Panel 



.CAN 
SAVE 

you 



MONEY 




NOW READY 



Tabulations of purchases by the 400 families 
of the Oklahoma City Consumer Panel for 
the months of October, November and Decem- 
ber, 1947, are now ready. If you wish to see 
the report for any particular food or drug 
classification, write us today. 



THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING COMPANY: THE DAILY OKLAHOMAN 
—OKLAHOMA CITY TIMES— THE FARMER-STOCKMAN— KVOR. 
COLORADO SPRINGS— KLZ, DENVER AND WEEK, PEORIA AFFILI- 
ATED IN MANAGEMENT— REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE 
KATZ AGENCY. INC. 

MARCH 1948 



X he Oklahoma City Consumer Panel 
is a marketing test laboratory sponsored by 
Station WKY and the Oklahoma Publishing 
Company at an annual cost in excess of $50,000 
to provide today's advertisers with useful, up- 
to-date, significant market information which 
today's competitive selling requires. 

From daily purchase records kept by 400 
representative families, purchases in 40 se- 
lected classifications are coded on individual 
cards at the rate of 30,000 a month. Quarterly 
reports are available to advertisers without 
charge showing brands purchased, number of 
families buying, number of units purchased, 
price paid and the place of purchase. 

Special analyses correlating purchase 
records with biographical information for 
longer or shorter periods are available at 
actual tabulation cost. 

The Oklahoma City Consumer Panel, 
scientifically designed and controlled for ut- 
most accuracy, is conducted and supervised by 
Audience Surveys, Inc. Because it is capable 
of quick, exact measurement of consumer re- 
action to new products, advertising cam- 
paigns or merchandising plans — or keeping a 
constant check on old ones — the Consumer 
Panel makes Oklahoma City one of the most 
useful and sensitive test markets in the 
country today. Write today to find out how 
it can save money for you in 1948. 



OKLAHOMA CITY 



WKY 



m. 



I WQ.^ 



mn ^' 



SPONSOR REPORTS 

40 WEST 52ND 

NEW AND RENEW 

PS. 

MR. SPONSOR: SAMUEL C. GALE 

DIALING HABITS ARE CHANGING 

ESCAPE THROUGH RADIO 

WHO LISTENS TO FM? 

BEAUTY INTO THE HOME 

THEY RE GOING TRANSCRIPTION 

TV COMMERCIAL FILM 

CANDY ON THE AIR 

ONCE A YEAR EVERY YEAR 

SPOT TRENDS 

MR. SPONSOR ASKS 

BROADCAST MERCHANDISING 

SIGNED AND UNSIGNED 

4-NETWORK COMPARAGRAPH 

INDUSTRY CHART: CANDY 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

APPLAUSE 




1 
4 
9 
16 
20 
23 
26 
29 
31 
34 
36 
39 
44 
64 
66 
68 
70 
83 
90 
94 
94 



Published monthly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. Executive, 
Editorial, and Advertiainit Offices: 40 West 52 Street, New 

York 19, N. Y. Telephone: Plaia 3-6216. ChicaeoOffice: To K. 

Wark.r Drive, Telephone Fmancial 1556. Publication Offices: 
5800 North Mervine Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. Subscrip- 
tions: United States 15 a year; Canada 15.50. Singlp copies 50c. 
Printed in U. S. A. Copyright 1947 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. 

President and Publisher: Norman R. Glenn. Secretary- 
Treasurer: Elaine C. Glenn. Editor: Joseph M. Koehler. 
Associate Editors: Frank Bannister, Charles Sinclair. Art 
Director: Howard Wechsler. Advertising Director: Lester 
J. Blumenthal. Advertising Department: Edwin D. Cooper: 
(Chicago Manager) Kay Brown; (Los Angeles) Duncan A.Scott 
4 Co^448 S.Hill St.; (San Francisco) Duncan A. Scott & Co., 
— Mills BIdg. Circulation Manager: Milton Kaye. 

COVER PICTURE: "Escape" is just as mportant for a 
mother of three as it is for the bobby soxer, if not more so. 
Mrs. Annv Burke became Queer. For a Day and with her 
three boys vi.sited the movie studio«, where she was guest of 
juvenile star?, Bobby Driscoll and Luana Patton, who etand 
next to throne. 



10 WosI 52nd 



VIDEOS FOREIGN FILM 

I have just finished leading your article 
entitled "More Film Than Live" in the 
current (February) edition of sponsor. 
In this article you put forth the various 
advantages and disadvantages of films on 
television, as well as a survey of the cur- 
rent uses of films and film availabilities for 
video's prospective sponsors. 

I think the article deserves an all- 
important P.S. addended to it in the next 
issue. Nowhere in your review of film 
properties available for television screen- 
ing do you outline the advantages (both in 
price and quality) of outstanding films 
produced abroad in foreign languages. 
You simply pass these off in the ambigu- 
ous phrase (quote) "First-run foreign 
films, many of them with dialogue 
ghosted in English, will be available" 
(unquote). 

I feel that this is a totally inadequate 
statement on the situation that actually 
exists. Gainsborough Associates for ex- 
ample, has a catalogue of some of the 
most outstanding films ever made, films 
which have received universal critical 
acclaim and are today racking up grosses 
in neighborhood theatres that were previ- 
ously unheard of for anything other than 
an Amercan produced film. Each of 
these films is available for a commercially 
sponsored television film theatre program. 
Foreign-produced films are the only 
answer to the Holljwood boycott of tele- 
vision. Many of these movies cannot be 
matched by Hollywood. 

I think that an added word on the 
position of the foreign film in these early 
commercial stages of television develop- 
ment is essential to round out your other- 
wise excellent article. 

Nathan M. Rudich 
Director of television 
Gainsborough Associates, N. Y. 



"PLUS ADVERTISING | 

Here is the name to supplant "spot" in i 
designating advertising placed on a 
regional basis. It is a four-letter word; a 
word that is not now used by any other i 
medium to designate a t\pe of advertising. ' 

It is a word that will show to advantage 
the man\' extras which are derived from , 
this type of individualized advertising. ' 

1 1 is one which has been a byword of the 

(Please turn to page 6) 



MR. FINNIAN! 



Il's shamrock and shillelagh lime, but 
dorj't depend on an Irishman's luck to 
get a good radio buy! Mr. Finnian and 
YOU, too ... be "sponsor wise", invest 
your pot of gold in a sure sales winner 
. . . WWSW. Just look here: 



1. 




BLOCK PRO- 
GRAMMED Ml - 
SIC SHOWS like 
the Tommy Dor- 
sey Show, Six to 
Eight Special, 
Music and Sports 
Parade, that rate 
high with Pitts- 
burgh listeners. 

TOP SPECI.AL 
EVENTS COV. 
ERAGE ... 21 
permanent re- 
mote WWSW 
lines terminating 
at key Pittsburgh 
points. 

SPORTS COV- 
ERAGE . . . man, 
it's terrific I Foot- 
ball with the 
Steelers, base- 
ball with the 
Pirates, basket- 
ball, golf, tennis, 
plus coverage of 
scholastic and 
collegiate games. 

No leprechauns, no magic wands with 
WWSW. It's 16 years of experience in 
programming for Pittsburgh that has 
upped sales for local and national* 
advertisers. — So don your shamrock and 
hitch your sales wagon to a sure sales 
winner . . . WWSW — the station thai 
B.\GS MORE LISTE.NERS PER DOL- 
L.AR IN PITTSBIRGH! 

*g'wan ask Forjoe 



WWSW 



SPONSOR 



\ 





One station 



^^i^s^-^i^t^s^tt 



One set of call letters 



One spot on the dial 
One rafe card 



^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




Whether you sell to farmers or city 
dwellers — you can reach 'em both on 
KCMO. KCMO has the power - 50,000 
watts* non-directional. KCMO is pro- 
grammed to reach both audiences. 
And KCMO has the coverage — with 213 
of the richest counties in Mid-America 
inside the KCMO measured V2 millivolt 
contour (mail response from 374 counties 
in six Mid-America states, plus 18 
other states, indicates listeners far beyond 
this area). Center your selling on 
Kansas City's most powerful station. 

* 50,000 WATTS DAYTIME Non-Directional 
. . . 10,000 WATTS NIGHT -810 kc 



CMO 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 
Basic ABC Station FOR MID-AMERICA 



^3 Nafional Represenfaiive . 



John E. Pearson Co. 



MARCH 1948 



;^e5wingistoW«l'WQ^ 




EXTRA! 



EXTRA! 



EXTRA! 



10,000 WATTS! 

WHB is a buy-word with advertisers as well as 
listeners, because certain established WHB 
"extras" are general trade knowledge — extra 
pulling power, extra selling power, extra expe- 
rience; extra service in building fine, sound 
programs; and the extra famous WHB show- 
manship and jo/e de tivre. 

Soon, however, WHB will offer new extra 
facilities, too — 10,000 watts day and 5,000 watts 
night on 710 kilocycles, full-time operation! 

When will all this happen/" This month, we 
hope. Act now for an extra-good buy! 



10,000 WATTS IN KANS4 

DON DAVIS 

f »f s lOEN r ^ 

JOHN T. SCHILLING ^ 

CfN(»Al M*NAGf«. ^ 



MUTUAL NETWORK • 710 KILOCYCLES • 5,000 WATTS NIGHT 




10 \\>Nt 52ii€l 

Continued from page 4 



industry for many years, so therefore 
should experience no difficulty in gaining 
immediate acceptance among agency, 
representative, and station personnel. 

It is a descriptive word ... it has 
imaginative powers far and above the 
present word being used. It has the 
attribute of specifically describing an- 
nouncements and programs in one classi' 
fication. 

Mr. Editor, I submit as the most 
powerful word it is possible to use 
PLUS Advertising. 

For PLUS advertising (sp>ot advertis- 
ing) does give the advertiser all of the 
plusses, all of the extras, not found in net- 
work advertising. Plus values such as 
localization; individual markets; local 
merchandising; and all of the other 
known advantages. 

Robert Wasdon 
WLOW, Norjolk 



CONTEST INFO FOR MEXICO 

When I left Bozell & Jacobs at the first 
of the year, I also left my file of sponsor, 
thinking that they'd surely have the book 
here. To sum it all, here I am in the 
midst of all sorts of radio . . . without my 

SPONSOR. 

We have a client that is going to intro- 
duce a new product in about three 
months, and I'd like to do it with the old 
stand-by — a contest. I was wondering if 
you could send me those back issues of 
SPONSOR that might contain any informa- 
tion along these lines. 

Radio is without any question the most 
powerful medium here in Mexico. Most 
of our clients are on with at least a half- 
hour show each week. Coca-Cola of 
Mexico, like its big brother in the States, 
uses lots of radio. Add to this General 
Motors, Philco, La Moderna (cigarettes), 
Cuautemoc Brewery (beers), and many 
others, you can see that it's a wonderful 
place for the man who likes radio. 
Kendall Baker 
Publicidad D'Arcy, S. A. 
Mexico City 

AN "OLD" CONTEST 

On page 52 of your February issue you 
continue to list the American Oil Com- 
pany Professor Quiz contest for home 
listeners. This contest was ended some 
time ago and I would greatly appreciate 
it if you will eliminate this entry from 
your future contest listings. 

(Please hmi to page 14) 



SPONSOR 



WCON'S 7-WAY PROMOTION PLAN 



1. OUR OWN NEWSPAPER - THE 
ATLANTA CONSTITUTION - Editorial 
Promotion is heavy and consistent and 
Display Advertising is continuous. 

2. OUR OWN AIR - Intelligent plan- 
ning and consistent plugging feature pro- 
motion programs over WCON's own air. 

3. BILLBOARDS — Nine permanent 
boards located on main arterial highways. 
Boards are equipped with reflectors to do 
a day and night job. 



4. WCON NEWS PICTURES - 200 

attractive display pieces featuring news 
and WCON promotion. 100 in Atlanta — 
100 in trading territory. 

5. WCON CONTEST-An outstanding 
audience participation contest will be 
announced shortly. 

6. SPECIAL EVENTS PROMOTION - 

WCON personalities, presented on a con- 
tinuing basis, before social, civic and 
school groups with entertainment and 
informational features. 



7. TRANSITADS — Car cards are employed each month; a 
full showing, reaching approximately 300,000 commuters daily. 




The Way To Get Results In Atlanta! 

Every effort is made by WCON personnel to cooperate fully with 
national and local advertisers — to secure top return on every 
advertising dollar spent on this station. We are the heirs of eighty 
years prestige and goodwill established by The Atlanta Constitu- 
tion. We strive to deserve it — to carry over this valuable asset to 
advertisers who use our station. We believe WCON will produce 
best results in Atlanta and Georgia — try us! 



WCON 



Drawing by A. B. Frost from "UNCLE REMUS: His Songs and His Sayings" by Joel 
Chandler Hsrris, which first appeared in THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION in 1879. 
Copyright 1908, 1921, by Esther La Rosa Harris. By permission of D. Appleton-Century 
Company, publisher. 



ATLANTA 



THE 
ATLANTA CONSTITUTION 

STATION 
5000 Watts 550 KG 

Affiliated 
American Broadcasting Company 



MARCH 1948 



National Representatives HEADLEY-REED COMPANY 




NBC AFFILIATE 



Edward Retry & Co., National Representatives 

SPONSOR 



I I 



new and renew 



Ne4M AcUianal SfuU Buduteld. 



WM 

ImM. 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



CAMPAIGN, start, duration 



Colrtaie-Palmolive-JVei Co 

(iriftin Mfg Co 

Hull «i Kuckel, Inc 

IHri-s Bottlinii Co (Chi.) 
Kaiser- Frazi'r Corp 

Lambert Ptiarniacal Co 
I. ever Bros Co 

Life Savers (^orp 

Mennen Co 

New Engl (lonfectioiiery (;<> 
Park & lilforti Co 

Perm-Asepcic Co 

Procter & Ca ruble Co 
White Rock Corp 

*.Stati<>n list already set. 



l.ustre-Creme Leiinen & Mitchell 

.Shampoo 
(•ritfin .Shoe Polish Berniingham, Castle- 
man & Pierce 
X-Ba/.in (depilatory) Redtield-Johnstone 

Beverages Harry J. Lazarus 

Cars .Swaney, Drake & 

Bement 
Listerine .\ntiseptic Lambert & Feasley 



Breeze 

<:andy 

Men's toiletries 

Necco (candies) 
'I'intex 



Federal 

Young & Rubicam 

Uuane Jones 

LaRoche & Ellis 
Charles Storm 

Kuttncr & Kuttner 



Dry-cleaning 

method 
.Shasta (shampoo) Compton 
Beverages Kenyon & Kckhardt 



.nIt-T.Sf 1-min e.t. spots; Keb-Mar; "» wks 

7.S Live newscasts, e.t. spots, breaks; Mar 8 (starts in .S., 
moves N. sea.sonally); 26 wks 
10-2(1 Spots, breaks; Jun I; L? wks (if product copy accept- 
able) 
8-10 Spots, breaks; Mar-Apr; \i wks 
300 E.t. spots, breaks; Feb 2.S-Mar LS; l.^-.Si wks (some new 

and some renewals) 
5-5 E.t. spots, breaks; Mar-.Apr; li wks 
25* E.t. spots, breaks; Feb-Mar; l.?-26 wks (Expatiding 

campaign in Midwest) 
5-6 Spots, breaks; Mar 1 ; 52 wks (On ABC's O&O statitins, 

may expand later) 
.^0* 15-niin "Musical Clock" segments; Feb 15-Mar I; 

13 wks 
20* E.t. spots, breaks; Feb 16-Mar I; 16 wks 
.50-60 Live, e.t. spots, breaks; Mar 8-15; 10 wks (annual 

spring campaign — mostly east of Mississippi) 
10-15 E.t. spots, breaks; fall 1948; 13 wks (may expand) 

25-50 1-min e.t.'s; Mar-Apr; 13 wks 

S* Time signals, spots; Feb-Mar; indef (starts on Kla. 
stations may expand) 



I\lei4A OHxIt (leyieuje-d an ^eleaii>ian 



SPONSOR 



AG£NCy 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, st«rt, duration 



Apex Electric Mfg Co 

(Fold-A-Matic irons) 
Botany Worsted Mills 
Ford Motor Co and 
P. Lorillard Co 



Meldrum & Fewsmith WABl). N. V. 



General Foods 

(Sanka Coffee) 
William Gretz Brewing Co 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co Newell-F.mmett 



Silberstein -Goldsmith 
J. Walter 'rhompson 

(Ford) 
Lennen & Mitchell 

(Lorillard) 
Young & Rubicam 

Seberhagen 



Lucele, Ltd (furs) 
RCA- Victor Dealers 



William Warren 
Direct 



WBKB, Chi. 
WCBS-TV. N. Y. 



WABD, N. Y. 

WPTZ, Phila. 
WNBT, N. Y. 
WPTZ, Phila. 
WRGB. .Schenec. 
WMAR, Balto. 
WNBW, Wash. 
WABD, N. Y. 
KSD-TV. St. Louis 



Reynolds & Co (Investments) Hansell & Zoock 
-Schenley Distillers (;orp Blow 

(Cresta Blanca wines) 



WPTZ. Phila. 



Transmirra Products Co 
Western Saving Fund Soc 
(bank) 



WABD, N. Y. 

WTTG. Wash. 

WFIL-TV, Phila. 

WMAR, Balto. 

WWJ-TV, Detroit 

KSD-TV, St. L. 

WBKB, Chi. 

KTLA, L. A. 
Smith, Bull & McCreery WBKB, Chi. 
Geare-Marston WPTZ, Phila. 



MARCH I94S 






.Spots; Mar 14; 13 times (n) 

Weather spots; Feb 13; 13 wks (r) 

Brooklyn Dodgers Baseball Games; Apr 2!>; season (n) 



Film spots; Mar 1; 17 wks (r) 

Sports Scrapbook; Th 9:15-9:30 pm; Jan 15; 13 wks (n) 
N. Y. Giants Baseball (iames; season (n) 



Doorway to Fame (panic); Mon 7-7:30 pm; Jan 19; 13 wks (n) 
Junior Jamboree; MThFS 3:30-4 pm. Sun 8:30-9 pm ; Feb 14; 

13 wks (n) 
Filin spots; Feb 10; 13 wks (n) 
Film spots; Mar 8; 52 wks (n) 



Today's World Picture (news); Mon 7:45-8 pm; Feb 2; 13 wks(n) 
Film spots; Feb 10; 13 wks (n) 




f^ew. On AetuM^kd, 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, j»art, duration 



Ml.. IS Mlllinii <:.. 
I'l-rry-Morsi' Si'i-d (Ui 
l.ambiTt Phiirmiual Co 
Liitli-n's Ini' 
Mars Inc 

llenjaniln Moore & Co 
I'harmaco Inc 
Si'i-man Hrothers Inc 
Slmtwi-ll Mffl Co 
Sianilarcl l.aboralorios Inc 
Zenith Radio Corp 



Krwin. \\asi'> 

MacManus. John A \<l;ims 

lanihcrl A Keaslcy 

J. M. Maihes 

(;rani 

St. CJeorftes & Keyes 

RuthrauR & Ryan 

William II. Welntrauh 

C. Wendel Muench 

Roche. Williams & <:leary 

McFarland, .\veyard 



MM 


24 


(US 


I.SH 


(US 


I«.I 


CHS 


4.) 


NBC 


40 


\»C 


200 


MBS 


100 


.\BC 


I2.S 


MBS 


4*1 S 


ABC 


141 


MBS 


4.i0 



\iini Mary: M1W IF .»:.»0-.«:4S pm pst . Feb l«.; f,l wks 

(iarden (Jate: Sal I0-10:1.S am; Jan 17; Id »k« 

Khe Burrf>WN; .Sat 7:.?0-7:4.^ pm; Jan .<; .S2 wks 

Ned Calmer; Sun H:S.S.'» pm; Jan 1H; 9 wk« 

Dr. I. O. Jr: Sat .S..S:.lO pm est; Mar 6; S2 wks 

Your Home Beautiful: Sat I0-I0:1.S am; Mar (>; l.< wkn 

Official Detective; Tu H:.W-8:5S pm; Jan 20; It »k» 

Cal York; Sat IO:.)0.10:4.S am; Jan 31; 52 wks 

True or False; Sat .S:.W-6 pm; Feb 7; .S2 wks 

Henry Morftan; Th 7:.?0-X pm; Jan 29; S2 wks 

Radio Newsreel; MTWTF 9:IS-9:.W pm; Mar I; S2 wk^ 



' Fiflv-hro trrfkl grnrrni'v mrnnt n 13-ttrrk rnnlrnri uilh nplinnt fnr ,7 tiirre>silf fl-uffk r^nnni's. II s siihirri !n rrmrfllnlum nt Ihr rnii uf nnv 1.1-werk pfrii,<l 



Re*teiuaU 0*t NetwoA^ 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



NET STATIONS 



\merican Oil Co 
.Vnchor-Hockinft Class Corp 
(Jeneral Motors Corp 
(Milf Oil Corp 
rhilip Morris & Co 
Petroleum .\dvisers Inc 
Ouaker Oats Co 
Revere C;amera (^o 
Williamson Candy Co 



Joseph Katz. 

William H. Weintraub 

Foote. Cone & Beldinfi 

YouniS & Rubicam 

Blow 

Ellinfiton 

RuthraufT & Ryan 

Roche. Williams & Cleary 

Aubrey, Moore & Wallace 



PROGRAM, tim«, start, duration 



ABC 


108 


CBS 


145 


CBS 


160 


CBS 


118 


CBS 


145 


NBC: 


81 


MBS 


445 


MBS 


22 


MBS 


450 



Prof. Quiz; Sat 10-10:30 pm; Jan 24; 52 wks 

Crime Photographer; Th 9:30-10 pm; Jan 1; 52 wks 

Man Called X; Sun 8:30-8:55 pm; Jan 4; .52 wks 

We the People; Tu 9-9:30 pm; Feb 3; 52 wks 

Call for Music; Fri 10-10:.?0 pm; Jan .10; 52 wks 

Highways in Melody; Fri 8-8:30 pm; Jan 23; 52 wks 

Those Websters; Sun 6-6:30 pm ; Feb 29; 52 wks 

Jan August: Th 8-8:15 pm; Feb 12; 52 wks 

True Detective Mysteries; .Sun 4:30-5 pm; Feb 29; hi »ks 



New- /l<f>e*tC4f, /lp/pxUitt*Hettti 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT 



AGENCY 



.\rlene's Monogram Service. San Jose 
Haby Boudoir Furniture Co. Des Moines 

I'aul K. Beich Co. Bloomington, III 

HclHngham (ias Co, Bellingham. Wash. 

Hredenberg Distributing Co, Buffalo 
Caliente Race Track, Tijuana. Mexico 

Clarldgc Food Co. N. Y 

Coburn Farm Products Corp (Sondra Foods div), N. 

Dif Corp, Garwood. N. J 

Dr, Chase Medicine Co. Oakvllle. Ontario. . . 
Ford Motor Co (Lincoln-Mercury dIv). Detroit 

Free .State Brewery. Balto 

(; & (; Products Co Inc. Boston 
Golden Productions. H'wood. 

II & S Pogue Co. CIncI 

High Life Distributing Co. Des Moines 
Hires Itoltling Co. Chi. 
Ho Chung Co Inc. N. Y. 

lay-lhiy Dress Co. N. Y 

D. J. Kennedy C:o. Pittsburgh 
Kiwi Polish Co Ltd. N. Y. 
I.anseair Travel Service Inc. Wash. 
I.ucele Inc. N. Y. . . 

Millers of California. S. F 

Monlicello Drug Co. Jacksonville 

Hairy Myers & Co Inc. Balto 

Natl Distillers Products Corp. N. Y. 

Orange-Crush Co. Chi.. 

Poller Drug Ac Chemical Corp. Maiden. Mass. 

Piirnlicd Down Products (^orp, N, Y. , 



Monogram service 

Baby furniture 

Whiz, Pecan Pete candy bars 

Public utility 

Labatt's Canadian ale . . 

Race track 

Meat products 

Foods 

Washing powders, hand cleaners . 

Proprietary 

.Automobiles 

Hackney .Ale 

.Allen's Barcolene. 

"Texas. Brooklyn and Heaven" . 

Dcpt store 

Miller High-Life. Edelweiss. Fitger beer 

Root beer 

<:hinese teas 

Dresses 

Building materials 

.Shoe polish 

Travel service . 

Fur coats 

(Costume jewelry 

666 Cold Preparation. Cold Tablets 

.Styleplus Clothes 

I la Han Swi.ss Colony Wines; Ci & D Wine 

Vermouth 

Orange Crush. Old Colony soft drinks 

Cuticura .Soap. Oinlmeni 

Pillows. 

{P\ca$e\{\{rn to fya/je 70) 



Ad Fried. Oakland 

Meneough. Martin & .Seymour. Des Moines 

Ollan. Chi. 

West-Marquis. .Seattle 

Ellis. Buffalo 

Roche-Eckoff. H'wood. 

Al Paul Lefton. N. Y. 

Hoot. N. Y. 

Norman A. Mack. N. Y. 

F. H. Hayhurst. Toronto 

Kenyon & Eckhardt. N. Y. 

Theodore A. Newhoflf. Balto, 

Ingalls-Miniter, Boston 

Buchanan, L. .A. 

KlldufT Clncl. 

Meneough. Martin A -Seymour. Des Molncv 

Harry J. Lazarus, Chi. 

Steedle. Rankin & Boyle. N. Y. 

Bermingham. (^astleman & Pierce, N. Y. 
Pratt & Burk, Pittsburgh 
Duane Jones, N. Y. 
French & Preston. Wash. 
William Warren, N. Y. 
Allied, L. A. 
Charles W. Hoyi, N. Y. 
.St. (Jeorges & Keyes. Ballo. 

Plait-Forbes. N. Y. 

Ruthrauff & Ryan. N. > . 

Masons. Toronto 

Bermingham. Castlcman A Pierce. N. Y. 



§. 



\ 1 




IT TAKES 
MORE THAN 



•J>V/i>» 







(which we have!] 



^jj^-'^^Jc^/siryesoV 




to dttrdct and hold 
dn dudience/ 



/omi 



TSlUnSlf^^l^f^ 



In radio as in everything else, skill, showman- 
ship and know-how must be coupled with power. 

Take the massive block of 39 Iowa counties a I 
the right — nearly 40% of all counties in the 
State. It is "served" by dozens of stations. 
Yet the 1947 Iowa Radio Audience Survey 
shows that in those 39 counties, from 5 :00 a.m. 
through 6:00 p.m., WHO''s average percentage of 
listening is actually 62.2! 

There is only one answer to such listener- 
preference. That answer is Top-Notch Program- 
ming — Outstanding Public Service. Write for Survey 
and see for yourself. 




WHO 

*for Iowa PLUS + 

DES MOINES . . . 50,000 WATTS 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



MARCH 1948 



11 



ATLANTA 



^C^ 





MONTH 



JANUARY. 1948 



HOOPER 



C1TY:__ATIANTA^ 



STATION USTEHmO mOEX 

\ _ B ^ 




Authority: C. E. HOOPER, Inc. 



Mi J 



January Hooper share of audience 
ratings show WAGA leading two 
Atlanta network stations, morning, 
afternoon and night. ••first in the 
field on Saturday -and leading three 
network stations on Sunday afternoon! 
Call Avery-Knodel for the complete 
story on Atlanta^s best buy! 



WAGA 



5000 WATTS • 590 KILOCYCLES 






My Advice Is To Send For The 
ZIV SHOW FILE" 
This new, time-saving, money- 
saving file briefs the big-name, 
big-time ZIV transcribed pro- 
grams that are being used so 
successfully by local advertis- 
ers. Send for this file. Study it. 
See how it enables you to select 
a network-type ZIV show that 
will compete with multi-thou- 
sand-dollar programs ... at 
your pro-rata single-city cost. 
Consider ZIV shows like these: 

BARRY WOOD SHOW: 

A smooth-as-silk, quarter-hour musi- 
cal, starring Barry Wood, with song- 
stress ^fa^pa^et Whitinp, the Melody 
Maids, and the smooth strings of 
Hank Sylvern and his orchestra. 

BOSTON BLACKIE: 

One of radio's best half-hour mys- 
tery shows. Top ratings everywhere: 
Louisville, 21.7 . . . Youngstown, 
• 21.3 . . . Cincinnati, 16.9 . . . Min- 
neapolis, 16.5. 

WRITE FOR AVAILABILITIES 



40 \V«vst 52ud 

Continued From page 6 



1 want to take this opportunity of add- 
ing that I look forward each month to 
receiving my copy of sponsor. You are 
doing an excellent job. 

Robert G. Swan 

Director of radio & television 

Joseph Katz Co., Baltimore 

► Correction of this listing arrived tcK> late to 
malce the February deadline. 



9,000,000 FEET WRONG 

Our library consists of approximately 
10 million feet of film — not 1 million as 
you indicate. 

Frederic W. Ziv 

President 

Frederic W. Ziv Co., Cinci. 




NEW YORK 
CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 



TELEVISION IMMEDIACY? 

In More Film Than Live in the Febru- 
ary SPONSOR, the statement is made that 
"television, to a great section of the view- 
ing public and of those who will eventu- 
ally become TV set owners, is 'moving 
pictures in the home without film or home 
projectors.' " 

Then the article goes on from this 
premise to talk about the use of film in 
television. 

What I want to object to is the accept- 
ance of that statement. If there is any- 
thing that TV has over motion pictures, 
it is the factor of immediacy. If there is 
anything that makes television more of a 
must to the buying public — as against 
owning a movie projector — it is its ability 
to bring into the home events that are 
taking place — simultaneous!}'. I say this 
advisedly. Certainly people in the indus- 
try itself are approaching the whole sub- 
ject from that point of view (although I 
suspect there are a few who do not do so). 

If that public opinion research poll is 
correct, why should it be necessary for 
people to buy television sets? Would it 
not be easier and perhaps less expensive 
for them to buy movie projectors? From 
m>' own point of view, it would be a sad 
day for television were the whole concept 
changed to one of video being just "mov- 
ing pictures in the home without film or 
home projectors." 

That's all I have on my chest. The 
rest of the article is fine. 

Earl B. Abrams 

Editor 

Television Digest, Wash., D. C. 







. . . listening to WMT, that is. 
Amber is a small town in neighbor- 
ing Jones County. Our home county 
has to go some to keep up with the 
Joneses — for even our competitors* 
admit that 100% of the radio fami- 
lies in Jones County listen to WMT. 
(We're listened-to-most by 787c!) 

Among the 101 counties in WMT's 
BMB map there are many counties 
like Jones — where the finest fre- 
quency in Iowa radio (^'.MT's600 kc) 
carries fully balanced program fare 
to rural and urban markets. 

Cultivate potent \^'MTland. Ask 
the Katz man for details. 

• Name on request. 




"SN.X.. 



.WMT 

CEDAR RAPIDS 

5000 Wotts 600 K. C. Day and Night 
BASIC COLUMBIA NETWORK 



«t 



14 



SF>ONSOR 



rn Ttr-.. 1 ■ - I 





. , , AMEEICANS AEE ^;# 
SENTIMENTAL 




Li And It's A Good Thing-For the Sponsors 



"9^ 

-,«^ 



^6 






BY EDGAR KOBAK 

President, Mutual Broadcasting System 

Americans are sentimental about children and church bells and 
baseball. About many other things too. Perhaps that's why you 
find soft hearts under hard exteriors... perhaps that's why they 
gladly dig down into pocket and purse to help people in need. 
Americans are responsive and loyal — to ideals and friends and to 
radio programs which they have come to consider as friends. 

We, at Mutual, are forever seeing astonishing expressions of 
this sentiment and loyalty and helpfulness from our listeners. 
Let me give you a few recent examples, all of which happened 
on Mutual programs: 

GIFTS KEEP A FAMILY TOGETHER 

In A. L. Alexander's "Mediation Board" broadcast of December 
21, 1947, a man who had served a prison term told of his un- 
equal struggle to find employment against a solid wall of preju- 
dice and to keep together his family of wife and three children. 
No sooner was the broadcast over but our switchboard was 
jammed with calls offering help; the next day brought a deluge 
of mail. In a few days, listeners had sent in a total of five mail- 
truck loads of letters with money and packages with everything 
from clothing and toys to foodstuff's and bicycles. All told there 
were 5,627 parcels and 515,212.00 in cash or checks. Plus 63 
offers of jobs. 

A TRUE MIRACLE OF THE BELL 

There's a little church in Grand Junction, Colorado, whose fame 
has spread throughout the country. It had been built by funds 
laboriously raised by subscriptions from the congregation, but 
there was no church bell — because the money just didn't reach 
that far. 

A church member wrote to "Heart's Desire"... the story was 
first told on the broadcast of August 4, 1947 and the suggestion 
made that listeners might wish to "send in your penny." In a 
very short time, 224,581 pennies were received — and every county 
in every state of the Union was represented. The church now 
has a bell with a suitable inscription and on Sundays its rings out 
its tribute to thousands of responsive people who have never 
even seen Grand Junction. 

GIRL FINDS DOCTOR WHO SAVED HER LIFE 

During the bombing of Manila, a young Filipino girl regained 
consciousness to find herself lying in the street — so badly burned 
she didn't think she would live. An American doctor came by, 
bound her wounds, saw that she was taken to a hospital and 
cared for. 

On December 26, 1947 this same girl, visiting in Hollywood, 
was selected "Queen For A Day" on the program of the same 



name. Her wish was to locate the doctor who had saved her life 
and to express her thanks. All she knew was that his name was 
Dr. Retalleck and that he might be "somewhere in the United 
States." Almost before the program was over, several telegrams 
came from listeners giving the doctor's address — in Iron River, 
Mich. "Queen For A Day", of course, arranged a reunion. 

THE U. S. IS CRAZY ABOUT THE SERIES 

The Dodgers and Yankees don't have to look to New York alone for 
their fans — they find them everywhere in America. And that is a 
strange thing for it transcends all limitations of home-town 
loyalty. We have proof of this. 

The World Series of 1947, you'll remember, was a close battle 
between Dodgers and Yankees. Listeners throughout the U. S. 
gave this Series the highest average rating a Series has ever had 
— 36.7— and it gave to the Sunday, October 5th game, the high- 
est rating ever hit by a daytime commercial show— 57.6 
(Crossley). Over 72% of all U. S. radio homes heard at least 
one game and better than a third of these homes were glued to 
their radios all seven games. 

* * * 

I could go on and on. But these examples are enough to prove 
Americans are sentimental... that when they are moved by sen- 
timent they are also moved to action. As I have said, this is a 
good thing for the sponsor, for once a sponso